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Continued: Computerizing people may be next step in tech

  • Article by: STEVE JOHNSON , San Jose Mercury News
  • Last update: January 7, 2014 - 5:09 PM

Other such gadgets would go under the skin.

MicroChips of Lexington, Mass., recently reported success testing a microchip implanted waist high that automatically provided daily doses of medicine to osteoporosis patients. In February, regulators approved an eye implant by Second Sight Medical Products of Sylmar that lets the visually impaired see shapes and movements transmitted to the implant from a camera on their glasses. And University of Southern California scientists are studying implanted chips to restore memories in people with dementia or strokes.

Critical issues to be resolved include how to update the devices’ software, maintain their battery power and shield them from hackers. But Eric Dishman, who heads Intel’s health care innovation team, predicts the gadgets will become common.

“There’s going to be an ecosystem of things on and in the body,” he predicted, adding, “this is the ultimate in personalized medicine.”

 

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