Page 2 of 2 Previous

Continued: Newborn blood samples often aren't tested in time

  • Article by: MARK JOHNSON , Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
  • Last update: December 2, 2013 - 1:38 PM

David Dimmock, on call for Children’s Hospital that night, was at home in bed when the phone rang. The voice on the other end described a baby with an alarmingly high ammonia level, so high that it was not clear he could be saved. “The real dilemma we had at this point,” he said, “was: Do we even transport the child down?”

Dimmock told the team to bring the baby.

Colton turned 1 in October. No one knows the extent of his brain damage. It may take years to determine how delayed he is in reaching key developmental milestones. “I don’t know what to predict for the future,” Dimmock said, “because he’s exceeded all expectations.”





 

  • related content

  • Health briefs: Vitamins may help untreated HIV patients

    Saturday November 30, 2013

    vitamins may help HIV patientsA daily dose of multivitamins and minerals in the early stages of HIV infection can delay...

  • Babies in distress: Aaron Wilkerson, 3, pointed to the memorial tile bearing the name of his older brother, Noah, with parents Sarah and Chris at the Rowan Tree Foundation Angel Memorial Plaza in Parker, Colo. Noah was born with a rare metabolic disorder and died when he was 4 days old. When the disorder is detected early, it is 90 percent treatable. However, Colorado didn’t process Noah's screening test on the weekend.

  • By all appearances, Colton Hidde seemed healthy following his birth in New London, Conn., Oct. 2, 2012. (Courtesy Hidde family via Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MCT)

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close