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Continued: Rise in thyroid cancer diagnoses is challenged by Mayo researchers

  • Article by: JEREMY OLSON , Star Tribune
  • Last update: August 27, 2013 - 10:41 PM

Susan Evans of St. Paul, who underwent treatment last year to remove a lesion in her thyroid gland, said the overtreatment problem might, in part, reflect doctors not talking enough with one another about options before passing along test results or recommendations.

More coordination between the ear, nose and throat specialists, endocrinologists and other physicians might produce a more cautious treatment plan, she said.

“If they were to work a little more hand in hand … in these cases, I think some people would be able to sit it out a little more,” Evans said.

Removing the cancer label might encourage more conservative treatments, but doctors would still need to be vigilant of small tumors, said Dr. Anders Carlson, an endocrinologist with HealthPartners in St. Paul.

“There definitely are instances where papillary thyroid cancer is quite aggressive and does spread and does cause quite a burden of disease,” he said. “So I think you have to be a little bit careful. You don’t want the pendulum to swing too far the other way.”

 

Jeremy Olson • 612-673-7744

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