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Continued: Large US military study questions link between combat duty and suicide

  • Article by: LINDSEY TANNER , AP Medical Writer
  • Last update: August 6, 2013 - 4:35 PM

Rachel Yehuda, director of traumatic stress studies at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, said the study "calls into question the previously assumed relationship between length of combat exposure and suicide" but doesn't address other ways combat affects mental health.

Hoge said service members are routinely and extensively screened for mental illness before enlisting and afterward and those who are seriously ill are rejected. But he noted that some mental illnesses typically emerge first in young adulthood.

He said the military has made great efforts to offer treatment to those affected.

"There's been a huge increase over the last several years in the number of mental health professionals working at military facilities," Hoge said. These include combat stress teams in the field and counselors back home.

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