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After first sniff, mosquitos aren't bugged by DEET

Posted by: Colleen Stoxen Updated: February 21, 2013 - 4:49 PM

Is it possible that blood-sucking mosquitoes are outsmarting our efforts to thwart them?

Mosquitoes can become desensitized to the insect repellent DEET, according to a new study. Although most bugs are strongly deterred by DEET, researchers had previously found that some mosquitoes and flies carry a genetic change in the odor receptors on their antennae that allows them to ignore the smell.

In their new study on a particular type of mosquito, the researchers found that a short-term change rather than a genetic adaptation makes them immune to the repellent's smell for at least a few hours after exposure.

"Our study shows that the effects of this exposure last up to three hours. We will be doing further research to determine how long the effect lasts," James Logan, of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said in a journal news release.

The study involved Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue fever and bite in the daytime. The researchers found that even brief exposure to DEET was enough to desensitize the mosquitoes to the repellent's smell.

Up to three hours after being exposed to DEET, the mosquitoes were not deterred by the product and were still attracted to heat and human skin.

"We think that the mosquitoes are habituating to the repellent, similar to a phenomenon seen with the human sense of smell," Logan said. "This doesn't mean that we should stop using repellents -- on the contrary, DEET is a very good repellent and is still recommended for use in high-risk areas."

The findings were published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Read more from WebMD.

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