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When depression drugs fail, psychotherapy may help

Posted by: Colleen Stoxen Updated: December 7, 2012 - 12:23 PM

Cognitive behavioural therapy can reduce symptoms of depression in people who fail to respond to drug treatment, says a study in the Lancet.

CBT, a type of psychotherapy, was found to benefit nearly half of the 234 patients who received it combined with normal care.

Up to two-thirds of people with depression do not respond to antidepressants. The study in Britain followed 469 patients with treatment-resistant depression. One group of patients continued with their usual care from their doctors, which could include anti-depressant medication, while the second group was also treated with CBT.

After six months, researchers found 46% of those who had received CBT reported at least a 50% reduction in their symptoms. This compared with 22% experiencing the same reduction in the other group.

Read more from BBC News.

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