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The younger a teen's first drink, the greater problems are later

Posted by: Colleen Stoxen Updated: August 15, 2012 - 3:46 PM

An early age at first drink has been linked to later alcohol-related problems, new research shows.

"Many studies have found relationships between an early [first drink] and a range of negative alcohol-related outcomes later in life, including the development of alcohol use disorders, legal problems like DUI, and health problems like cirrhosis of the liver," said Meghan Rabbitt Morean, a postdoctoral fellow in the department of psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and corresponding author for the study.

"An adolescent who consumed his first drink at age 15 was at greater risk for heavy drinking and problems than an adolescent who took his first drink at age 17. Further, an adolescent who took his first drink at age 15 and also drank to intoxication at age 15 was at greater risk for heavy drinking and problems than an adolescent who had his first drink at age 15 and did not drink to the point of intoxication until he was 17," Morean said.

The authors also found that impulsive personality and family history of alcoholism were related to age of first drink and future problems.

Read more from Medical XPress.

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