Tips for taming the Sunday blues

  • Updated: December 7, 2013 - 2:00 PM

Don’t procrastinate: Do what you can to finish the workweek. Leave a clean desk to greet you Monday. If you have unpleasant weekend chores, get them done on Saturday, or at least spread them out.

Make the best of Sunday: Plan fun, fulfilling activities, including R and R. “It’s very easy to passively waste the day or spend it doing tasks that are draining rather than rejuvenating,” said psychologist Jenna Bemis. Instead organize “funday” events or do some volunteer work.

Make the best of Monday night: Having something to look forward to will make the day less daunting. It could be dinner out or catching up on the phone with a friend.

Unplug: Those e-mails can wait. So can the Facebook posts, Tweets and Pinterest plugs. Step away from the smartphone and relax, even if only for the final hours of the weekend.

Relax: Bemis said that research indicates that the busier our lives get, the more likely we are to feel the Sunday blues. “Taking extra time to rest or engage in quieter activities can lead to rejuvenation,” she said.

Show some gratitude: Think about, or even make a list of, things you are grateful for. Talk with friends or loved ones for whom you’re especially appreciative.

Think in the present: If you’re obsessing over the upcoming workweek or something from the past, snap back into the moment. “It’s impossible to fully enjoy whatever you are doing in any given moment,” Bemis said, “if your mind is jumping ahead to the future or back to the past.”

Assess yourself: Figure out if there’s a certain time or trigger when the doldrums set in, then consider changing your Sunday routine to avoid that trigger. Consider assessing the bigger picture. Are you dissatisfied with part of your life? Whether it’s your job, your relationship, your health, address it.

Get help: Talk to friends or loved ones if you continue to be bummed out. Get professional help if you’re having debilitating anxiety attacks or severe depression.

Bill Ward

  • related content

  • Once a day of rest, Sunday has become Sad Day

    Monday December 9, 2013

    Austrian psychotherapist Viktor Frankl coined the phrase “Sunday night blues” in 1946. But it is real, and surprisingly widespread — affecting schoolkids, office workers, even recent retirees.

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: What's your favorite citrus fruit?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close