'Rhymes With Orange' comes to the Star Tribune's comics pages

  • Article by: CONNIE NELSON , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 11, 2013 - 3:26 PM
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A panel from the "Rhymes With Orange" comic strip by Hilary Price.

Hilary Price isn’t new to the world of comics.

She’s been drawing her strip, “Rhymes With Orange” daily since 1995. Since then, she has won the appropriate awards (“Best Newspaper Panel” from the National Cartoonists Society twice), and she has all the attendant merchandise (T-shirts, greeting cards, clocks and coasters).

She is new, however, to the Star Tribune newspaper.

Starting today, “Rhymes With Orange” will be featured in the daily paper. Her punchline-driven panels (which she refers to as a “gag strip”) also will appear on Sundays.

We talked with Price, who lives in New England with a “big lump of love” dog, about why she doesn’t use the word “moron,” the humor of 8-year-olds and what she gets in exchange for a banana and yogurt.

Q: Welcome to the Star Tribune’s funny pages. What would you like to say to readers?

A: Noboby likes change. It’s disconcerting to open up your comics page and see something different. It takes awhile to make a new friend on the comics page.

Q: What does your strip offer readers?

A: Well, there’s something new every day. If you didn’t like the strip one day, you might like it the next. If you like oddity and word play, grab your paper and come and sit down with me. And bring your coffee.

Q: Can you make any other promises?

A: Nobody gets called a moron. I don’t like that kind of humor.

Q: What kind of humor do you have?

A: Even though I’ve reached the venerable age of 43, I have a much younger sense of humor.

Q: How young?

A: Let’s just say I get along really well with my 8-year-old nephew.

Q: While it looks like a multi-panel cartoon, you usually focus on a single punchline. How do you describe your comic?

A: My strip is a gag strip, rather than a narrative strip. My process is to think up a plot first, then audition characters. Most narrative cartoonists do it the other way around. They have characters that drive the plots.

Q: Do you have recognizable characters, like Jeffy or Ratbert or Luann?

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