Lives of Red Lake students become part of museum exhibit

  • Article by: ALEJANDRA MATOS , Star Tribune
  • Updated: January 29, 2013 - 3:57 PM

A group of Red Lake students shine as the stars of a new display in the “Then Now Wow” exhibit at the Minnesota History Center.

 

Jayln Isaham had heard stories like these before: American Indian children removed from their families, forced to live and work in boarding schools that tried to strip away their heritage. Jayln’s great-grandmother was one of them.

“When she was forced into one of those schools, she said her Ojibwe name, and they duct-taped bags of marbles to her knees and made her clean the floor on her hands and knees,” she said.

So the 14-year-old Isaham wasn’t surprised to see hardships like these depicted in the “Then Now Wow” exhibit, which opened in November at the Minnesota History Center.

She was surprised to be asked to be part of the display, which contrasts the lives of Indian children in boarding schools from 1879 to 1950 with the lives of middle-school students on the Red Lake reservation today.

A total of 14 students, including Isaham, were selected by the school librarian and teacher at Red Lake Middle School, Gloria Collyard. Last year, curators from the museum interviewed the students, and photographers and videographers followed them around like paparazzi, documenting them on the way to school, going from class to class, talking with friends in an attempt to capture their everyday lives.

The museum then put together a simple but powerful display contrasting the two time periods. A single row of old-fashioned desks, faded black-and-white photos, letters and keepsakes depict life at a boarding school. A brightly colored contemporary lunch table represents the “now” section of the display. The lunch table is topped with 14 red cafeteria trays, each with a profile of one of the students.

“That side is so sad and dark,” said Isaham, talking about the portion of the display on the Indian boarding schools. “Then you look at ours and it’s like BAM!, colorful and happy.”

Ellen Miller, the exhibit developer for the Historical Society, said the aim of the display is to help visitors relate to the students from Red Lake.

“The key in introducing people from all backgrounds is to show that experiences are universal,” Miller said. “They are special, but they are also just regular kids.”

Seeing themselves

In January, the students made the four-hour trip from Beltrami County to the Twin Cities to see their display at the museum for the first time. They were startled — and pleased — to see themselves and how different their lives looked from those of their ancestors.

“I hope people can see how much has changed,” said 16-year-old Athena Cloud, “but [the display] also teaches them to be more open-minded.”

During their visit, the students didn’t shy away from talking about the challenges the Indian community still faces.

“In the movies, they make us seem like we are bad people,” said Jerol Beaulieu, 14.

“They think we are all bad people,” said Dayton Lussier, 14.

But, they maintained, those negative stereotypes have helped spur them to succeed.

“They motivate me to prove them wrong,” Cloud said.

  • related content

  • The "Then Now Wow" exhibit at the Minnesota History Center, contrasts old and new.

  • James Norris, 14, laughed with his classmates while discussing the exhibit.

  • The “Then Now Wow” exhibit at the Minnesota History Center contrasts old and new, including a display about American Indian children who were shipped off to boarding schools in the 19th and 20th centuries. Students from the Red Lake Reservation contributed to the exhibit, which matched their modern-day experiences with that of their ancestors.

  • Students from the Red Lake Indian Reservation toured “Then Now Wow,” an exhibit they contributed to at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul.

  • “THEN NOW WOW”

    The newest addition to the “Then Now Wow” exhibit features students from Red Lake Middle School and a look back at life in an Indian boarding school from 1879 to 1950.

    Where: Minnesota History Center, 345 W. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul.

    Cost: $11 adults, $9 seniors (65+), $9 college students (valid ID), $6 ages 6-17.

    Hours: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tue., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wed.-Sat., noon to 5 p.m. Sun. Closed Mondays.

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