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Continued: Meningitis outbreak is linked to steroid

  • Article by: JEREMY OLSON , Star Tribune
  • Last update: October 6, 2012 - 11:14 AM

Katherine Hlusak received a steroid injection for back pain in mid-August, and weeks later suffered a variety of symptoms including severe nausea, dizziness and slurred speech. After a week in the hospital and two weeks in nursing care, she returned home Oct. 2.

On Thursday, she got a call from the pain clinic asking about her health; on Friday, she got another call saying she had received one of the suspect injections and that she should seek further medical evaluation. She will visit her family doctor Monday.

Now she’s eager to learn if the injection was the cause.

“If that’s the case,” she said, “and this is what I had, I’m mighty mad. Mighty mad.”

Jeremy Olson • 612-673-7744
 

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