Staff Directory 10645806

Joel Rippel

News Assistant | Newsroom
Phone: 612-673-4684
Recent content from Joel Rippel
Hancock’s Tyler Timmerman got beyond Mason Clines on a 75-yard kick return for a touchdown.

Hancock beat Mountain Iron-Buhl in Nine-Man semifinal

Series of touchdowns turns tie into blowout.
Fortune Gordien, a three-time Olympian, held the world record in the discus for 10 years.

Fortune Gordien: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

The three-time Olympian held the world record in the discus for 10 years.
Francis (Moose) Goheen played competitive hockey for 20 years.

Frank (Moose) Goheen: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

One of the best hockey players in the world during the first 25 years of the 20th century.
Paul Giel, shown in 1952, was an All-America in football and baseball for the Gophers.

Paul Giel: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1990

Winona native was All-American in two sports.
In 106 professional fights, Tommy Gibbons, a heavyweight, lost only five times.

Tommy Gibbons: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Tommy Gibbons was one of the top heavyweight boxers of the early 20th century.
Mike Gibbons, shown in 1915, lost only eight of 133 professional fights and is a member of four boxing Halls of Fame.

Mike Gibbons: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

The "Phantom" is a member of five boxing Halls of Fame.
Verne Gagne, shown in 1960, was a 16-time World Heavyweight wrestling champion.

Verne Gagne: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Gagne was 16-time wrestling world champion.
Carl Eller, shown sacking Roger Staubach of the Dallas Cowboys in 1975, was an All-America for the Gophers and a six-time Pro Bowl selection for the V

Carl Eller: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1989

A defensive standout for both the Gophers and Vikings.
Bob Dunbar was one of the greats in curling in the late 19th century and early 20th century.

Bob Dunbar: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Was a member of nine team state champions in curling.
Gil Dobie, shown in 1948, played for the Gophers before becoming a successful college football coach.

Gil Dobie: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

Hastings native was unbeaten in his first 11 seasons as a college football coach.
Dr. L.J. Cooke coached the Gophers basketball team for 28 sesons during his 40 years at the University of Minnesota.

L.J. Cooke: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

Cooke was Gophers first basketball coach and worked 40 years at the "U."
Rod Carew, shown in 2017, won seven A.L. batting titles and was an All-Star in each of his 12 seasons with the Minnesota Twins.

Rod Carew: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Carew was a 12-time All-Star with the Minnesota Twins.
Walter Bush Jr., shown in 1968, served as president of the Minnesota North Stars for 10 years.

Walter Bush: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1989

Walter Bush's career in hockey was rewarded with a spot in two hockey halls of fame.
Herb Brooks, shown in 1978, coached the Gophers hockey team to three NCAA titles and the U.S. Olympic team to a gold medal in 1980.

Herb Brooks: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1990

Brooks coached U.S. team to "Miracle on Ice."
Eveleth, Minnesota native Frank Brimsek recorded six shutouts in his first eight games in goal for the Boston Bruins in 1938.

Frank Brimsek: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1988

Brimsek was called "Mr. Zero" after his stellar NHL debut.
Les Bolstad, shown in 1954, coached the University of Minnesota golf team for 30 years.

Les Bolstad: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1972

One of the top amateur golfers and coaches of the 20th century.
Patty Berg won 29 major amateur golf tournaments before turning professional in 1940, helped found the Ladies Professional Golf Association tour in 19

Patty Berg: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

No Minnesotan had a better record in, or meant more to, the game of golf.
Bobby Bell helped the Gophers football team win a national championship in 1960 and reach the Rose Bowl in 1961 and 1962.

Bobby Bell: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Two-time All-America is one of the top players in 'U' football history.
Jeanne Arth, shown in 1967, won nine women’s USTA/Northern Section singles titles and won a doubles championship at Wimbledon.

Jeanne Arth: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1986

St. Paul native was tennis pioneer.
Quarterback Fran Tarkenton, who led the Minnesota Vikings to three Super Bowls, was the NFL’s all-time leader in passing yardage when he retired in

Fran Tarkenton: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1987

Quarterback led Vikings to three Super Bowls.
Sandy Stephens, shown as a freshman in 1958, quarterbacked the Gophers to a national title and two appearances in the Rose Bowl.

Sandy Stephens: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Stephens led Gophers to two Rose Bowls.
Jimmy Robinson, an accomplished trap and skeet shooter, became one of the top outdoors writers of the 20th century.

Jimmy Robinson: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1972

Robinson was a top shooter and outdoors writer.
Kirby Puckett, center, and his teammates celebrated the Twins’ victory in the 1991 World Series.

Kirby Puckett: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Puckett was key member of two World Series teams.
Alan Page, shown in 1971, was first-team All-Pro six times in his 12 seasons with the Vikings.

Alan Page: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1989

Page was twice named the NFL's Defensive Player of the Year.
St. John’s coach John Gagliardi watches the Johnnies against Wis.-Eau Claire in Collegeville, Minn., in September of 2004.

John Gagliardi: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2019

An unconvential coaching philosophy was the foundation of a Hall of Fame career.
Willard Ikola, who played on three state championship hockey teams with Eveleth H.S., coached eight teams to state hockey titles.

Willard Ikola: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2019

After All-American career as a goalie, he became a coaching legend.
Lindsay Whalen acknowledges the crowd in the final seconds of Game 5 of the WNBA Finals against the Los Angeles Sparks in October 2017 at Williams Are

Lindsay Whalen: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2019

Hutchinson native became one of the Gophers and WNBA's all-time greats.
John Randle, one of the top pass rushers in NFL history, is shown during a Vikings’ playoff game against the New York Giants in December 1997.

John Randle: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2019

An undrafted free agent, Randle became one of the top pass rushers in NFL history.
Randy Moss points to the crowd after catching a 61-yard TD pass against the Detroit Lions at the Pontiac Silverdome in 2000.

Randy Moss: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2019

The wide receiver was productive from the outset of his NFL career.
Randall McDaniel played 12 seasons for the Minnesota Vikings after being selected in the first round of the 1988 NFL draft.

Randall McDaniel: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2019

The Hall of Famer was adept at both pass-protection and run blocking.
Sid Hartman’s first byline

Still on the scene: It's the 75th anniversary of Sid Hartman's first story

On Oct. 28, 1944, Sid Hartman's name appeared on a Minneapolis Times story about the growth of sports at Patrick Henry high school. At 99, he's still writing.
John Hansen.

John Hansen, who blended coaching football and directing choirs at Osseo High, dies

In an interview with the Star Tribune in 1989, John Hansen said, "When I graduated from college, I had two great interests: music and football."I…
Walter Hoover, shown in 1978, is one of the greatest scullers of the first half of the 20th century.

Walter Hoover: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

One of the first Americans to win England's Diamond Sculls.
Max Winter, shown in 1960, helped bring the Minneapolis Lakers and Minnesota Vikings to Minnesota.

Max Winter: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1987

Winter helped bring the NBA and NFL to Minnesota.
Gar Wood, shown in 1929, dominated power boat racing in the first half of the 20th century.

Garfield (Gar) Wood: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1959

He dominated power boat racing in the first half of the 20th century.
Dave Winfield, shown rounding first base on Sept. 17, 1993 after getting his 3,000th career hit, spent 22 seasons in the major leagues.

Dave Winfield: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Former Gopher spent 22 seasons in major leagues.
Dr. Henry L. Williams coached the Gophers football team for 22 seasons.

Dr. Henry L. Williams: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Gophers football program stabilized and grew under Williams.
Bud Wilkinson, shown in 1936, was a three-year starter for the Gophers before becoming a college football coaching legend.

Charles (Bud) Wilkinson: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1972

Minneapolis native is a college football coaching legend.
Edwin Widseth was a two-time All-America at tackle for the Gophers in the 1930s.

Edwin Widseth: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

The two-time All-America is one of the Gophers all-time greats.
Murray Warmath, shown in 1959, coached the Gophers football team to two Big Ten titles and two Rose Bowls.

Murray Warmath: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Warmath coached the Gophers football team for 18 years.
Emmett Swanson was a member of two U.S. Olympic rifle teams.

Emmett Swanson: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1959

Minneapolis native had 30-year career in competitive shooting.
Bruce Smith won the Heisman Trophy in 1941 after helping the Gophers football team win the Big Ten Conference title and the national championship.

Bruce Smith: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1986

Smith is only Gopher to win Heisman.
Gophers baseball coach Dick Siebert, center, and his team celebrate after winning the 1960 Big Ten Conference title — one of 11 Big Ten titles for S

Dick Siebert: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1987

Siebert led 'U' baseball team to three national titles.
George Quam overcame a handicap to become one of the top handball players in the U.S.

George Quam: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

Overcame handicap to excel in handball.
Tony Oliva, shown in 1965, was the American League Rookie of the Year in 1964.

Tony Oliva: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1988

Oliva was an All-Star eight times.
Star Tribune file
Mike O’Dowd, shown in 1957, was the World Middleweight boxing champion for three years.

Mike O'Dowd: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

St. Paul native was world middleweight champion for three years
Cindy Nelson, shown in 1974, was a member of four U.S. Olympic ski teams.

Cynthia (Cindy) Nelson: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1990

Nelson was a four-time Olympian.
Bronko Nagurski is in two football Halls of Fame and won three world championships as a professional wrestler.

Bronislau (Bronko) Nagurski: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

One of the top football players and professional wrestlers of the 20th century.
Clarence (Biggie) Munn, was an All-America for the Gophers before a successful college coaching career.

Clarence (Biggie) Munn: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

Minneapolis native is in the College Football Hall of Fame.
Tommy Milton, shown in 1925, won the Indy 500 race in 1921 and 1923.

Tommy Milton: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Minnesotan was first to win Indy 500 twice.
Vern Mikkelsen, center, shown in 1957 with George Mikan (left) and John Kundla (right), was a standout for Hamline and the Minneapolis Lakers.

Vern Mikkelsen: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1988

Mikkelsen was a college, NBA standout.
In 1950, George Mikan was named the outstanding U.S. basketball player of the first 50 years of the 20th century.

George Mikan: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

At 6-foot-10, he revolutionized basketball.
John McGovern, shown in 1909, was a three-year starter at quarterback for the Gophers.

John McGovern: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Only 5-foot-9, he was an All-America in football.
John Mayasich, shown in 2013, was a member of two U.S. Olympic hockey teams and is a member of the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame.

John Mayasich: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1987

Mayasich still holds H.S. and Gophers records.
Earl Martineau, shown in 1923, was a two-time All-America in football and a standout in track and field for the Gophers.

Earl Martineau: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1972

Earl Martineau is part of Gophers football lore.
Jim Marshall (70), shown in a game in 1974, started 270 consecutive regular-season games for the Vikings.

Jim Marshall: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1986

Marshall was a key member of the "Purple People Eaters."
John Mariucci, shown in 1961, has been called the “godfather of Minnesota hockey.”

John Mariucci: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1986

Eveleth native played in the NHL and coached the "U" for 14 years.
Pug Lund was an All-America at halfback and helped the Gophers win the national football championship in 1934.

Francis (Pug) Lund: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1990

Lund was an All-American in football for "U."
George Loomis trained and drove harness racing winners for nearly 50 years.

George Loomis: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

His harness racing career spanned nearly 50 years.
Robin Lee, shown in 1965, won five consecutive national figure skating titles.

Robin Lee: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

Lee was top U.S. figure skater in the 1930s.
Dorothy Franey Langkop, shown in 1983, set 25 American and Canadian records during her speed skating career.

Dorothy Franey Langkop: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

St. Paul native was top speed skater of era.
John Kundla, shown in 1957, was the first coach of the Minneapolis Lakers and coached the Gophers basketball team for nine seasons.

John Kundla: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1990

Kundla coached NBA's first dynasty.
Harmon Killebrew was one of the top power hitters in major-league baseball during his 21 seasons with the Minnesota Twins.

Harmon Killebrew: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1972

Killebrew was one of top power hitters in MLB history.
Tom Kelly led the Minnesota Twins to two World Series titles in his 15 seasons as the Twins manager.

Tom Kelly: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Kelly managed Twins to two World Series.
Mike Kelley, shown in 1948, was the dominant figure in Minnesota baseball for the first half of the 20th century.

Mike Kelley: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1959

Kelley's 50-year professional baseball career had an impact.
F.W. (Nick) Kahler, shown in 1938, was a hockey standout before becoming a promoter.

F.W. (Nick) Kahler: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1963

Pioneer of hockey and the Sportsmen's Show.
Harrison “Jimmy” Johnston was the first Minnesotan to win the U.S. Amateur golf tournament when he won the event in 1929.

Harrison (Jimmy) Johnston: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Minnesota's golfer of the first 50 years of the 20th century.
Red Wing, Minn., native John S. Johnson was a world champion in bicycling racing and speed skating.

John S. Johnson: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1959

Minnesotan was a world champion in two sports simultaneously
Joe Hutton Sr. coached the Hamline basketball team for 35 seasons.

Joe Hutton Sr.: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1972

Hutton led St. Paul school to three national titles.
Lou Hudson, shown in 1973, was a standout for the Gophers before a 13-year NBA career.

Lou Hudson: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 2006

Hudson was a Gophers basketball pioneer.
Jean Havlish, shown in 1967, is in the Bowling Hall of Fame and played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

Jean Havlish: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1988

Havlish was a top bowler and all-around athlete.
William (Pudge) Heffelfinger, a three-time All-America for Yale, became the first professional football player in 1892.

William (Pudge) Heffelfinger: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Minneapolis native was the first "professional" football player.
Halsey Hall, right, shown in 1976 with announcer Joe Boyle, had a career in newspapers and broadcasting for nearly 60 years.

Halsey Hall: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1989

Minneapolis native had a long broadcasting and journalism career.
Calvin Griffith, shown in 1974, brought major-league baseball to Minnesota.

Calvin Griffith: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1986

Griffith brought big-league baseball to Minnesota.
Chief Bender, shown in 1909, was the first pitcher to win six World Series games.

Charles Albert "Chief" Bender: Minnesota Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Class of 1958

Baseball Hall of Famer won 212 games in his MLB career.