Job-Search Problems, Keys And Solutions

  • Article by: KEVIN DONLIN , Star Tribune Sales and Marketing
  • Updated: July 7, 2008 - 11:35 AM

It’s been said that, successful people aren’t free from problems, successful people solve problems. To be successful in your job search, you must solve problems -- lots of them -- between now and the day you get hired.

It's been said that, successful people aren't free from problems, successful people solve problems.

To be successful in your job search, you must solve problems - lots of them - between now and the day you get hired.

The faster and more creatively you do so, the shorter your search for work will be.

Here's the story of how one woman ran into a roadblock in her job search, with suggestions that can help her - and you - solve problems and get hired faster.

Dear Kevin,

I had an interview last Friday with an ad agency for an Account Executive position. The main partner got stuck in traffic and couldn't make it. I met with the other partner for 10 minutes, while we waited.

I hardly had a chance to talk about my qualifications. After that, I waited in a conference room for 40 minutes, alone.

Finally, they told me the other partner was not going to make it. I sent a thank-you email to the man I did meet, letting him know that I was very interested in the opportunity and that I looked forward to continuing our discussion. He emailed back, thanked me for my time, and said they'd be in touch.

I called Monday and left a message with the person who set up the interview, letting her know I would like to reschedule.

It is now a day later, and I still haven't heard anything back. What would you do if you were in my position? I don't want to be a pest.

- Jane M. in Michigan

Here's what I suggest for Jane …

First, these guys seem like jerks. My hunch is you won't want them as bosses.

That said, if your research, networking contacts and gut tell you that this is a place where you'd love to work, you need to try something creative to get back on their radar.

Here's an idea: You said the other partner never showed up, which means you met with only half the team, right? So let's use "one half" as a key to a possible solution.

First, I suggest you print out whatever PowerPoint presentation, case study or information you wanted to share with both partners, but weren't able to.

Then, cut the whole thing in half, from top to bottom, so they can't read any complete sentences but will get a sense for the scope of your material.

Finally, mail half of it to the partner who never showed up, with a note that says, "Sorry we couldn't connect on Friday. I met with only half your team, so I couldn't explain the many reasons why hiring me would be a terrific idea. Here's one half of what I wanted to show you - please call me today at 313-222-7777 to arrange a meeting when I can deliver the rest of the story."

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