Your Job Search Is A Marketing Campaign

  • Article by: KEVIN DONLIN , Star Tribune Sales and Marketing
  • Updated: January 27, 2005 - 10:00 PM

The successful job search is really just a personal marketing campaign. And the same techniques used in infomercials and junk mail can help you get hired.

I'll prove it to you.

First, let's define marketing. I like this definition: marketing is finding and getting customers.

That sounds like a job search, doesn't it? Finding and getting a job.

So, why not break from the pack -- and find a job faster -- by adapting and adopting some of the world's most effective marketing techniques?

Here are three ways to do it.

1. Start Your Résumé With a Headline

In his 1963 classic, "Confessions Of An Advertising Man," David Ogilvy wrote that five times as many people read a headline as do an entire ad. So if your headline is weak, you've just wasted 80 percent of your advertising dollars.

How does this apply to résumés?

Since employers often have hundreds of résumés to read, it makes sense to give your résumé a "headline." Because you want to grab the hiring manager's attention and keep them reading.

So, how do you create an arresting headline for your résumé? This tip is (or was) one of my top résumé writing secrets, so pay attention ...

Start your résumé with a summary section, no longer than two sentences. In the first, tell the employer what you want to do for them. In the second sentence, fire off your biggest gun and briefly hint at the best thing you've ever done on the job.

Here are three real-life examples of résumé "headlines" that got my clients hired.

 

    SUMMARY
    Accomplished senior management professional with over 15 years of financial and project leadership experience in traditional and high-tech sectors. Increased operating cash flow by more than $50 million.

     

     

 

 

    SUMMARY
    Experienced marketing and business development executive with more than 15 years of achievement in Fortune 500 and start-up environments. In current role, nearly doubled sales in two years, to $130 million.
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