Sushi errors top eatery violations

  • Article by: JANE FRIEDMANN , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 17, 2010 - 8:32 AM

Origami Restaurant logged the highest number of critical food-code violations among the 366 prepared-food establishments inspected by the city of Minneapolis this summer.

Other sushi restaurants made the list of top violators in part for failing to provide records showing "ready-to-eat raw" fish and seafood had been frozen long enough to kill parasites.

Ten inspectors check up on each of the city's 1,700 eateries at least once a year. I obtained inspection reports from the Minneapolis Department of Regulatory Services and took a look at the latest three months available: June, July and August. The businesses were ranked by the most critical violations, which are the ones most likely to cause food-borne illness. Those usually must be corrected by the next day. I used the number of noncritical violations to break ties.

Upon reinspection, the businesses on the list were found to have corrected all violations with these exceptions: Caterers renting from the Black Forest Inn will receive food safety training this month and the restaurant will be reinspected in November. Zahtar and Ingebretsen's hadn't been reinspected by early last week.

1 Origami Restaurant, 30 N. 1st St., 10 critical violations.

Sushi fish kept for only two days in a standard freezer, five days less than required. Lobster thawing in a sink of dirty utensils. Too-strong cleaning solution. Unlabeled spray bottles. No illness log on site.

2 Shuang Hur BBQ, 2710 Nicollet Av., 9 critical violations.

Hot food was found below 102 degrees. No thermometer available. No hot water. Nobody present knew the proper dish-washing procedures. Unlabeled spray bottles. Cracked containers. Improper scoop.

3 Black Forest Inn, 1 E. 26th St., 8 critical violations.

Slicer contained two-day-old product. Cold food kept too warm (43-50 degrees) in prep rail and malfunctioning cooler. Food not date-marked. Improper scoop storage. Containers cracked. Equipment washed in wrong sink.

4 Downtown Market, 150 2nd Av. S., 8 critical violations.

Same sink used for raw-meat and vegetable preparation. Improper food temperatures. Chemicals stored alongside food. Open beverages.

5 Calami Coffee, 2910 Pillsbury Av., #102, 8 critical violations.

Person in charge did not know proper dish washing procedure. Somali egg rolls kept at 64-72 degrees. Hand sink not stocked. No illness log on site. Sesame cookies from an unapproved off-site location. Chemicals stored alongside food.

6 Chino Latino, 2916 Hennepin Av. S., 8 critical violations.

Couldn't show sushi salmon met parasite destruction. Black, moldy buildup in interior of ice makers. Improper scoops. Food at 51 degrees in broken cooler. Spray bottles unmarked. Open beverages in kitchen.

7 Fusion, 2919 Hennepin Av., 8 critical violations.

Couldn't show seafood met parasite destruction. Refrigerator had three-week-old hummus. Food not date-marked. Improper scoop. Cracked container. No illness log on site.

8 Zahtar, 615 S. 2nd St., 7 critical violations.

Couldn't show frozen fish met parasite destruction, but that info was faxed from supplier during inspection. Food in the prep line too warm due to malfunctioning cooler. Some food not date-marked. Unlabeled spray bottles. Improper scoops.

9 Ingebretsen's Scandinavian Foods, 1601 E. Lake St., 7 critical violations.

No hand sink in a food prep area. Cheese, herring, butter stored too warm. Deli meats and smoked foods for sale despite being past discard dates. Improper scoops. No illness log on site.

10 Ba Gu Restaurant, 4741 Chicago Av. S., 7 critical violations.

Improper freezing and recordkeeping of seafood. Some food not date-marked. Unlabeled spray bottles. Cracked container.

Each week, Hard Data digs into public records and puts a spotlight on rule breakers in the Twin Cities and Minnesota.

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