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Continued: Colorful new art invades an old, distinguished St. Paul building

  • Article by: KEVIN DUCHSCHERE , Star Tribune
  • Last update: June 12, 2013 - 8:01 AM

She reused old doors as studio tables and has applied for a city grant to restore the original ceiling and install a mosaic sculpture outside.

Greene, an African-American whose father left Mississippi for Minnesota in 1964 and recruited students to register black voters, is thrilled that her new home was designed by Wigington, the country’s first black municipal architect.

Wigington designed more than 50 St. Paul buildings, including schools, fire stations, the Highland Park water tower and Roy Wilkins Auditorium.

“I know he didn’t necessarily have all these colors in mind,” Greene said. “But my goal is to get the building back to being a community space.”

That was Wigington’s goal too, she said.

 

Kevin Duchschere • 651-925-5035

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  • Adrienne Sherman, right, of Roseville, laughed as her friend, Maddie Maney, of Minneapolis, nervously cut a plate for the first time during free studio time at Mosaic On A Stick, a mosaic supply store, in St. Paul. The owner, Lori Greene, moved into the historic Clarence Wigington building in Hamline Park about two months ago.

  • Greene, an artist, works on a commissioned piece for a restaurant in Dubai during free studio time at Mosaic On A Stick. She has renovated the interior of the building to open up the walls and expose the maple flooring.

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