Page 2 of 2 Previous

Continued: From jalapenos to yurts, festival insiders offer a few how-tos

A ger is a breeze to clean, stays very warm in subzero temperatures (thanks to several layers of felt and a small firepit for cooking in the center), but is cool in the summer with ventilation from top and bottom. Modern gers have generators powered by solar panels, and satellite TV.

You won’t spend a lot of money on clothes — there’s closet space for only a couple of outfits per person — or toys, because the only game in town is shagai, a kind of dice toss played with polished parts of sheep ankle bones. If you’re still not convinced, Haltarhuu’s parents back in Mongolia moved from a city apartment back into a yurt after all their children were grown. They missed the fresh air.

Kristin Tillotson • 612-673-7046

SEE more photos of Haltarhuu and her family in the ger at startribune.com/entertainment.





  • related content

  • Chimgee Haltarhuu inside a ger (the Mongolian word for yurt) at this weekend’s Festival of Nations in St. Paul’s RiverCentre.

  • Volunteers hoisted the massive sun puppet that’s a central part of the annual May Day celebration in Powderhorn Park.

  • May Day parade puppeteer Esther Ouray (center, ponytail) has what it takes to handle a giant puppet like this tiger, with a little help from her friends.

  • Ed Cortinas ( in the red Vulcan suit) and other contestants during a Cinco de Mayo jalapeño-eating contest last year in St. Paul.

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close