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Continued: Minneapolis writer Kate DiCamillo wins second Newbery Medal for 'Flora & Ulysses'

  • Article by: LAURIE HERTZEL , Star Tribune
  • Last update: January 27, 2014 - 9:47 PM

The Randolph Caldecott Medal for best illustrated book went to Brian Floca for “Locomotive.” Two Minnesota publishers had books honored: “Beautiful Music for Ugly Children” by Kirstin Cronn-Mills, published by Flux, won the Stonewall Award along with “Fat Angie” by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo, and “Sex & Violence,” by Carrie Mesrobian, published by Carolrhoda Lab, was an honor book for the William C. Morris debut novel award.

The entire list is at www.ala.org/yma.

 

Laurie Hertzel • 612-673-7302

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  • Kate DiCamillo

  • After hearing she’d won the prize, “I came downstairs … and I wrote,” author Kate DiCamillo said Monday.

  • Kate DiCamillo, a Newbery Prize winning author who wrote ‚ÄúBecause of Winn-Dixie,‚Äù sits on a writing desk at her home in Minneapolis, Dec. 20, 2013. DiCamillo is being chosen to serve as the fourth national ambassador for young people‚Äôs literature, a two-year position that promotes reading through appearances across the nation. (Ben Garvin/The New York Times)

  • Her favorite books as a child

    When Kate DiCamillo was a child, she fell in love with a book about George Washington Carver.

    She no longer remembers the title, but she remembers checking it out of the library so many times her mother finally asked the librarians if they could just buy the book.

    “The librarians said, ‘Betty, it doesn’t work that way,’ ” DiCamillo said.

    Other books that made an impression:

    Henry and Ribsy,” and “Beezus and Ramona,” by Beverly Cleary

    Stuart Little,” by E.B. White

    Harriet the Spy,” by Louise Fitzhugh

    The “Little House” books by Laura Ingalls Wilder

    “The great thing is, if I stand in front of a group of kids and rattle off the names of books I loved, those books are still in print and they can read them, too,” DiCamillo said.

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