"MaddAddam” excerpt

  • Updated: September 21, 2013 - 2:00 PM

"MaddAddam," by Margaret Atwood

As they were eating the soup, they’d heard voices, approaching through the shoreline trees. It was the Children of Crake, the Crakers — the strange gene-spliced quasi-humans who lived by the sea. They were filing through the trees, carrying pitch-pine torches and singing their crystalline songs.

Toby had seen these people only briefly, and in daytime. Gleaming in the moonlight and the torchlight, they were even more beautiful. They were all colours — brown, yellow, black, white — and all heights, but each was perfect. The women were smiling serenely; the men were in full courtship mode, holding out bunches of flowers, their naked bodies like a fourteen-year-old’s comic-book rendition of how bodies ought to be, each muscle and ripple defined and glistening. Their bright blue and unnaturally large penises were wagging from side to side like the tails of friendly dogs.

Margaret Atwood

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