Laurie Hertzel is senior editor for books at the Star Tribune, where she has worked since 1996. She is the author of "News to Me: Adventures of an Accidental Journalist," winner of a Minnesota Book Award.

Posts about Book reviews

NBCC announces its annual 'best of the small presses' list

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: December 15, 2011 - 11:30 AM

 

Bonnie Nadzam.

Bonnie Nadzam.

 

It breaks our heart--and the hearts of the folks over at the National Book Critics Circle too, apparently--when small presses, obscure presses, university presses and new and emerging presses are overlooked (deliberately or not) when the multitude of year-end "best of" lists come pouring out.

So over at the NBCC's "critical mass" blog, it's become a bit of a tradition for them to deliberately overlook the big publishing houses when they do their list.

This year's "best of the small presses" list includes Carleton College graduate Bonnie Nadzam's novel, "Lamb" (which our reviewer loved) and "Leche," by R. Zamora Linmark, published by Minneapolis' Coffee House Press.

Doesn't this list make you want to find out more about Ig Publishing? Or Salmon Poetry? Or Artistically Declined Press?

Here's the whole list: 

1. "A Meaning For Wife," by Mark Yakich, Ig Publishing.

2. "Lamb," by Bonnie Nadzam, Other Press.

3. "Mad for Meat," by Kevin Simmonds. Salmon Poetry.

4. "A Double Life," by Lisa Catherine Harper. University of Nebraska Press.

5. "Ayiti," by Roxane Gay. Artistically Declined Press.

6. "Sing: Poetry from the Indigenous Americas," edited by Allison Adelle Hedge Coke, University of Arizona Press.

7. "Chulito," by Charles Rice-Gonzalez, Magnus Books.

8. "Boneshepherds," by Patrick Rosal. Persea Books.

9. "The Great Frustration," by Seth Fried. Soft Skull Press.

10. "Last Day on Earth," by David Vann. University of Georgia Press.

11. "Ciento," by Lorna Dee Cervantes. Wings Press.

12. "Leche," by R. Zamora Linmark, Coffee House Press.

Oooh, another 'top 100 books' list. Let's argue!

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: November 3, 2011 - 11:17 AM

 

Ernest Hemingway peruses the list of the top 100 American Novels 1891-1991 and thinks he should have been better represented.

Ernest Hemingway gets only one spot on the list of the top 100 American Novels 1891-1991.

 

Jeff O'Neal over at BookRiot (he also tweets as @readingape) has posted a list of the 100 best American novels.

(He also posted seven tips on how to fake it in book club--my favorite being "Create a diversion," by which he doesn't mean suddenly yell, "Fire!" but change the subject by asking who might play the main character in a movie.)

(Now I seem to be creating my own diversion by bringing up different blog posts. Let's get back to his list.)

He actually posted the list last July, but I first saw it this morning on the place where everybody sees everything nowadays (and the place where you might see this): Facebook. Connie Ogle, books editor of the Miami Herald, had posted a link, saying, "I would argue about the list for a good long time."

 

Anne Tyler

Anne Tyler

I'm always up for a good argument, so I clicked and read the list. I see holes! Big holes!  Do you? (Nice to see Louise Erdrich, but where's Anne Tyler? Or Lionel Shriver?) (Although arguably Shriver's best stuff came after 1991, which is when the list ends.)

 

What else would you include? What would you kick off? Is "American Tragedy" better than "Sister Carrie"? Does "Day of the Locust" deserve to be there over "Miss Lonelyhearts"?

The list is not ranked, but is in chronological order. O'Neal included only books published between 1891-1991. (So, no "Huck Finn," which was published in 1884, for example, and no Franzen, who came later than 1991.)

Here's the list. Argue away:

  • The Yellow Wallpaper and Other Stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1892)
  •  
  • Maggie, Girl of the Streets by Stephen Crane (1893)
  •  
  • The Country of Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett (1896)
  •  
  • The Awakening by Kate Chopin (1899)
  •  
  • The Call of the Wild by Jack London (1903)
  •  
  • The Golden Bowl by Henry James (1904)
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  • The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (1905)
  •  
  • The Jungle by Upton Sinclair (1906)
  •  
  • Three Lives by Gertrude Stein (1909)
  •  
  • My Antonia by Willa Cather (1918)
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  • The Magnificent Ambersons by Booth Tarkington (1918)
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  • Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson (1919)
  •  
  • Main Street by Sinclair Lewis (1920)
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  • Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man by James Weldon Johnson (1921)
  •  
  • Cane by Jean Toomer (1923)
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  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925)
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  • An American Tragedy by Theodore Dresier (1925)
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  • The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (1926)
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  • The Bridge of the San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder (1927)
  •  
  • Home to Harlem by Claude McKay (1928)
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  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (1929)
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  • Look Homeward, Angel by Thomas Wolfe (1929)
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  • The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett (1930)
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  • Flowering Judas and Other Stories by Katherine Porter (1930)
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  • The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck (1931)
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  • Call It Sleep by Henry Roth (1934)
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  • The Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller (1934)
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  • Appointment in Samarra by John O’Hara (1934)
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  • The USA Trilogy by John Dos Passos (1936)
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  • Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (1936)
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  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (1937)
  •  
  • Day of the Locust by Nathaniel West (1939)
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  • The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler (1939)
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  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (1939)
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  • Native Son by Richard Wright (1940)
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  • The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers (1940)
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  • The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand (1943)
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  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith (1943)
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  • All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren (1946)
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  • Tales of the South Pacific by James Michener (1947)
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  • The Naked and the Dead by Norman Mailer (1948)
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  • The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles (1948)
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  • The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson (1949)
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  • The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger (1951)
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  • Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (1952)
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  • Go Tell It On the Mountain by James Baldwin (1953)
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  • The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow (1953)
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  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (1953)
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  • Andersonville by MacKinley Kantor (1955)
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  • On the Road by Jack Keroauc (1957)
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  • Gimpel the Fool by Isaac Bashevis Singer (1957)
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  • The Wapshot Chronicle by John Cheever (1957)
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  • Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (1958)
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  • The Magic Barrel by Bernard Malamud (1958)
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  • Goodbye, Columbus by Philip Roth (1959)
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  • Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs (1959)
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  • The Little Disturbances of Man by Grace Paley (1959)
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  • Browngirl, Brownstones by Paule Marshall (1959)
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  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (1960)
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  • Rabbit, Run by John Updike (1960)
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  • The Sot-Weed Factor by John Barth (1960)
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  • The Moviegoer by Walker Percy (1961)
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  • Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (1961)
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  • Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates (1961)
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  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey (1962)
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  • The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath (1963)
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  • A Sport and a Pastime by James Salter (1967)
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  • The Confessions of Nat Turner by William Styron (1967)
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  • Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Philip K. Dick (1968)
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  • Slaughterhouse-5 by Kurt Vonnegut (1969)
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  • House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday (1969)
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  • them by Joyce Carol Oates (1969)
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  • The Collected Stories of Jean Stafford (1969)
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  • Play It As It Lays by Joan Didion (1970)
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  • The Complete Stories of Flannery O’Connor (1971)
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  • Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed (1972)
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  • Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner (1972)
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  • Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon (1973)
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  • Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow (1975)
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  • JR by William Gaddis (1976)
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  • Roots by Alex Haley (1976)
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  • Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko (1977)
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  • The World According to Garp by John Irving (1978)
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  • Airships by Barry Hannah (1978)
  •  
  • Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson (1980)
  •  
  • A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole (1980)
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  • The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty (1982)
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  • The Color Purple by Alice Walker (1982)
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  • Cathedral by Raymond Carver (1983)
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  • Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich (1984)
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  • Neuromancer by William Gibson (1984)
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  • White Noise by Don Delillo (1985)
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  • Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy (1985)
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  • Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry (1985)
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  • City of Glass by Paul Auster (1985)
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  • Beloved by Toni Morrison (1987)
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  • The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan (1989)
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  • The Shawl  by Cynthia Ozick (1989)
  •  
  • The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien (1990)
  •  
  • How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez (1991)

 

 

 

A summer indulgence of children's books

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: July 26, 2011 - 9:25 PM

 

Star Tribune illustration by Bruce Bjerva

Star Tribune illustration by Bruce Bjerva

When I was in my early teens, I landed a job shelving books at the public library in Duluth. It didn't pay well, and the work was tedious, but it allowed me to indulge my secret passion: children's books. Not picture books (though I do love them), but great engrossing novels written for teenagers. I brought home a bagful once a week, and spent the summers lost in the Secret Garden, or in World War II London with the Fossil family, or in Oregon, incognito with Greensleeves, or roaming the Highlands of Scotland with Kelpie, the water witch.

 I am old now, older than dirt, almost certainly older than the target audience for these books, but every now and then, I indulge again. This summer I've spent many weekends reading my way through a tall stack of books for middle-school kids and young adults.

In this coming Saturday's Variety section, you can read an interview with Red Wing, Minn., author Jacqueline West, whose second "Books of Elsewhere" novel has just been published, and read mini-reviews of four other books coming out by four other Minnesota writers.

To whet your appetite, here are a few other new books that deserve mention:

THE FLINT HEART by Katherine Paterson and John Paterson (Candlewick Press, pubs in September)

 You probably know Katherine Paterson as winner of the Newbery Medal (twice) and the National Book Award (twice). For this book, she teams up with her husband, John, to retell the story of the same name by the little-known writer Eden Phillpotts, who published it in 1910. I have not read the original version, but in the deft hands of the Patersons, it is a smoothly told, entertaining fairy story about a heart-shaped piece of flint which causes all kinds of trouble in the world by turning the heart of whoever possesses it to stone.

 In a press release, Paterson explains why they rewrote Phillpotts' story for a modern audience: "A book with subtle jokes about early twentieth-century British politics and a whole chapter devoted to a list of the variety of fairy life in Dartmoor was unlikely to be marketable in the twenty-first century," she said.

Rewritten it retains the whimsy but loses the bulk. And--a sign of twenty-first century success for sure--it's already been optioned.

NOAH BARLEYWATER RUNS AWAY by John Boyne. (David Fickling Books.)

More whimsy and magic here, nicely blended with reality and a healthy dose of Boyne's subtle humor. Noah Barleywater is an eight-year-old boy who runs away from home because --- well, he has a very good reason for running away. And it's not that his parents are mean to him, he insists, with a bit of indignation, when asked.

 He journeys through the dark forest to a village, and then to a farther village, and along the way he meets a tree who gets furious when he picks its apples, and a talking donkey, and his talky friend, an elderly dachschund. Eventually Noah finds his way to a toy shop, where the inanimate objects all are animate and where an elderly man sits carving a puppet. (Always a puppet. No matter what else he tries to carve, he always produces a puppet.)

Their conversation is laced with dark and funny stories from the woodcarver, and as they talk you slowly learn why Noah ran away, and who the old man actually is. This is a tender, moving and curious book, hard to categorize, easy to enjoy.

 THE PENDERWICKS AT POINT MOUETTE by Jeanne Birdsall (Alfred A. Knopf.)

 

Had enough fantasy? "The Penderwicks" is firmly set in the world of reality, one of those great old-fashioned books that would fit well on your shelf between the Elizabeth Enright books and maybe the Shoe books of Noel Streatfeild. I had no idea that books like this were still being written, but clearly others have paid better attention than I; Birdsall won a National Book Award for the first Penderwicks book.

 

In this, the third in the series, three of the strong, capable Penderwick children head off to Maine on vacation to stay with an aunt, while the oldest--the one they always count on to inforce the rules and solve the problems--heads elsewhere with a friend. The burden of being OAP (Oldest Available Penderwick) falls on the shoulders of second-born Skye, a nervous girl who spends most of the vacation worrying that she's going to screw up.

Not much happens here--the aunt conveniently sprains an ankle, which allows the kids great freedom. Middle sister Jane falls in love; the baby of the family, Batty, discovers a hidden talent; and longtime friend Jeffrey comes to visit and discovers a startling secret.

Birdsall balances old-fashioned storytelling and what might be known as "good clean fun" with the modern world. Yes, there are cell phones (but no vampires) but otherwise this charming story is timeless.

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