Laurie Hertzel is senior editor for books at the Star Tribune, where she has worked since 1996. She is the author of "News to Me: Adventures of an Accidental Journalist," winner of a Minnesota Book Award.

Minnesota well-represented in L.A. Times book awards

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel under Book awards, Book news, Coffee House Press, Graywolf Press, Milkweed Editions Updated: March 4, 2015 - 5:40 PM
Shawn Lawrence Otto

Shawn Lawrence Otto

The finalists for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize were announced today, and the list includes several books published by Minnesota publishers. Graywolf is represented in poetry (not surprising); Lerner Publications' Carolrhoda Lab imprint in young-adult (ditto); Uncivilized Books in Graphic Novels and Comics (ditto, given that they were a finalist last year, too) and Milkweed and Coffee House Press in fiction (ditto ditto ditto).

Here's the list, with links to our reviews when available. Winenrs will be announced on April 18:

BIOGRAPHY

Adam Begley, Updike, HarperCollins
Robert M. Dowling, Eugene O’Neill: A Life in Four Acts, Yale University Press
Kirstin Downey, Isabella: The Warrior Queen, Nan A. Talese/Doubleday
Stephen Kotkin, Stalin: Volume 1 – Paradoxes of Power 1878-1928, The Penguin Press
Andrew Roberts, Napoleon: A Life, Viking

CURRENT INTEREST

Atul Gawande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, Metropolitan Books
Jeff Hobbs, The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League, Scribner
Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, Spiegel & Grau
Matt Taibbi, The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap, Spiegel & Grau
Héctor Tobar, Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free, Farrar, Straus and Giroux

FICTION

Donald Antrim, The Emerald Light in the Air: Stories, Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Jesse Ball, Silence Once Begun, Pantheon
Siri Hustvedt, The Blazing World, Simon & Schuster
Jenny Offill, Dept. of Speculation, Knopf
Helen Oyeyemi, Boy, Snow, Bird, Riverhead

THE ART SEIDENBAUM AWARD FOR FIRST FICTION

Diane Cook, Man V. Nature: Stories, HarperCollins
John Darnielle, Wolf in White Van, Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Valeria Luiselli, Christina Macsweeney (Translator), Faces in the Crowd, Coffee House Press
Eimear McBride, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, Coffee House Press
David James Poissant, The Heaven of Animals: Stories, Simon & Schuster

GRAPHIC NOVELS/COMICS

Roz Chast, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? A Memoir, Bloomsbury
Jaime Hernandez, The Love Bunglers, Fantagraphics
Mana Neyestani, An Iranian Metamorphosis, Uncivilized Books
Olivier Schrauwen, Arsène Schrauwen, Fantagraphics
Mariko Tamaki (Author), Jillian Tamaki (Illustrator), This One Summer, First Second

HISTORY

Judith Flanders, The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens’ London, Thomas Dunne Books
Mark Harris, Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War, The Penguin Press
Walter Isaacson, The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution , Simon & Schuster
Adam Tooze, The Deluge: The Great War, America and the Remaking of the Global Order, 1916-1931, Viking
Lawrence Wright, Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David, Knopf

MYSTERY/THRILLER

Tom Bouman, Dry Bones in the Valley, W. W. Norton & Company
Peter Heller, The Painter, Knopf
Laura Lippman, After I’m Gone, William Morrow
Shawn Lawrence Otto, Sins of Our Fathers , Milkweed Editions
Peter Swanson, The Girl With a Clock for a Heart, William Morrow

POETRY

Claudia Rankine. Star Tribune photo by Aaron Lavinsky

Claudia Rankine. Star Tribune photo by Aaron Lavinsky

Gillian Conoley, Peace, Omnidawn
Katie Ford, Blood Lyrics: Poems, Graywolf Press
Peter Gizzi, In Defense of Nothing: Selected Poems, 1987-2011 , Wesleyan University Press
Fred Moten, The Feel Trio, Letter Machine Editions
Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric, Graywolf Press

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Michael Benson, Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time, Abrams
Martin J. Blaser, MD, Missing Microbes, How the overuse of antibiotics is fueling our modern plagues, Henry Holt and Co.
Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate, Simon & Schuster
Elizabeth Kolbert, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, Henry Holt and Co.
Christian Rudder, Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One’s Looking), Crown Publishers

YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE

Paul Fleischman, Eyes Wide Open: Going Behind the Environmental Headlines, Candlewick
Candace Fleming, The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia , Schwartz & Wade/Random House Children’s
E.K. Johnston, The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim , Carolrhoda Lab/Lerner Publishing
Andrew Smith, Grasshopper Jungle, Dutton Children’s Books
Jacqueline Woodson, Brown Girl Dreaming, Nancy Paulsen Books

Common Good Books ups the award for annual poetry contest

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel under Book news, Book stores, Garrison Keillor, Poetry Updated: February 25, 2015 - 8:12 AM

 

 

Last year, love was all you needed to enter the Common Good Books annual poetry competition. This year, love is not required---but you do need to revive the lost art of letter-writing.

The theme of this year's competition is "Dear You," and the bookstore is looking for poems in the form of letters--and they don't have to be nice ones, either. (Just poetic.) (And to real, living people.)

Proprietor Garrison Keillor has upped the prize money to $5,000, which will be divided into three $1,000 grand prizes and four $500 prizes for "poems of merit." This surely makes the bookstore's competition one of the most lucrative in the country for a single poem. Last year's competition, with prizes of $4,000, drew more than 1,000 entries.

Here are the rules for this year's competition:

1) The contest it open to anyone living within the United States.

2) Entries must be a single poem, in the form of a letter to a real, living person.

3) Entries must be original work, previously unpublished, and the author must have full rights to the material.

4) Only one entry per person.

5) Entries must be mailed to Common Good Books, 38 S. Snelling Av., St. Paul, MN 55105 and postmarked no later than April 4, 2015.

Winners will be announced at noon on Sunday, April 19, at a celebration at Macalester College's Weyerhaeuser Chapel.

Louise Erdrich to read from work-in-progress at her bookstore

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel under Author events, Book stores, Louise Erdrich Updated: February 19, 2015 - 7:18 AM

Birchbark Books in Minneapolis.

Readers and fans of writer Louise Erdrich have a rare opportunity to hear the prize-winning author read from one of her works-in-progress this weekend during her bookstore's midwinter celebration.

Birchbark Books in Minneapolis will be open extended hours (10 a.m. to 8 p.m.) on Sunday (Feb. 22), with Erdrich making several appearances between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. to autograph books (purchased on site, please) and read from her current work in progress.

Louise Erdrich in her bookstore.

Louise Erdrich in her bookstore.

The store will also have hot cider and cookies and will raffle off a number of gift items, including a handmade star quilt, a hand-crafted birdhouse, and first editions and broadsides, autographed by Erdrich.

Erdrich, who won the National Book Award in 2012 for "The Round House," owns the independent bookstore at 2115 W. 21st St., which also sells Native American crafts, jewelry and medicines.

Bockley Gallery, next door to the bookstore, will also be open Sunday. It currently is showing an exhibit of the works of artist George Morrison.

Raffle tickets are available for $5 each in advance, either at the bookstore or by phone. Call the store at 612-374-4023. You do not have to be present to win. But wouldn't it be fun to be there?

Folio Prize short list announced

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel under Book awards, Book news Updated: February 9, 2015 - 10:34 AM
Jenny Offill

Jenny Offill

The Folio Prize short list was announced today, a stellar lineup of novels from around the world. The prize carries an award of 40,000 British pounds; the winner will be announced March 23.  Last year's winner was "The Tenth of December," by George Saunders. 

Here's the list, with links to Star Tribune review when available:

"10:04," by Ben Lerner 

"All My Puny Sorrows," by Miriam Towes

"Dept. of Speculation," by Jenny Offill

"Dust," by Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

"Family Life," by Akhil Sharma

"How to Be Both," by Ali Smith

"Nora Webster," by Colm Toibin

"Outline," by Rachel Cusk

The short list was winnowed from a list of 80 titles nominated by the Folio Prize Academy. Judges included William Fiennes, Rachel Cooke, Moshin Hamid, A.M. Homes and Deborah Levy.

A feast of love for Charles Baxter

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel under Author events, Book news, Book stores, Local authors, Readings Updated: February 5, 2015 - 7:54 AM
Charles Baxter at Micawber's Books

Charles Baxter at Micawber's Books

Charles Baxter looked around at the crush of people inside Micawber’s Bookstore, a standing-room-only crowd, and he suggested that maybe he should cut his talk a little short. All those people standing, in winter coats and boots, it can’t be comfortable.

Nobody seemed to think that cutting things short would be a good idea.

Baxter, winner of the Rea Award for the Short Story and a finalist for the National Book Award for his novel “The Feast of Love,” was at Micawber’s to launch his new book, “There’s Something I Want You to  Do.”

Baxter wrote the book—a collection of ten stories, five about virtues, five about vices—after going through what he called a “dry patch” when he wasn’t writing much of anything. “I started going through some old notebooks,” he said, “and I came across some old pages from 30 years ago. This is how old they were—they were typed.”

The pages were from a story he had started and discarded, and as he read it he thought it was one he could finish now. He changed the locale from Michigan (where he had lived) to Minnesota (where he now lives). One of the characters used the word “loyalty” to talk about his father, and that became the name of the story.

A glittering night at Micawber's Books.

A glittering night at Micawber's Books.

The next story ended up being called “Bravery,” and, “I thought that was very odd,” he said. “I seemed to be writing stories about virtues.” He talked to his editor about writing a collection of stories called “Virtues,” and his editor said, "I think that’s a very bad idea."

In the end, Baxter put together a collection of stories about both vices and virtues. Not all vices and virtues, and not necessarily the most common ones. “Just the ones I’m interested in,” he said.

The title had a different genesis. In “Hamlet,” “the whole play essentially starts because the ghost of Hamlet’s father says, ‘There’s something I want you to do.’" Baxter said. "The same is true for ‘King Lear.’”  That request sets things in motion—and the higher the stakes of the request, the more dramatic the story.

Baxter looked out at the crowd and met the eyes of his brother, who was in the audience. “Since my brother is here, I can tell you that that phrase is also one that my mother used, over and over and over again.” And everybody laughed.

When he read, Baxter didn’t first read from the book but from an excised scene from one of the stories, “the equivalent of the DVD deleted scenes,” he said, or the director’s cut of a movie. The scene, originally in the story, “Chastity,” was both funny and poignant, an encounter between the main character of Benny and Benny’s mother, a cigarette-smoking-yoga-practicing woman whose divorce either “liberated or destabilized her, Benny wasn’t sure which.”

It was the following scene—a scene that takes place on the Washington Avenue Bridge, a scene that remained in the story—that was pivotal to Baxter. He read aloud the key sentence: “Irony was the new form of chastity and was everywhere these days. You never knew whether people meant what they said or whether it was all a goof.”

“And that’s the sentence that made me know I had a book,” he said.

And then questions, answers: He discussed that “dry patch” (“I like to think every writer experiences this. It feels a little like depression," he said, when no topic or subject seems appealing to write about. "It just feels like luck when a subject arrives and you think, ‘That’s something I can do. That’s something I want to do.’”) and themed collections (“You write these stories and you find out sort of belatedly what you’re writing about. My second collection, ‘Through the Safety Net,’ was about people who have had the rug sort of pulled out from under them. Though I didn’t realize until I was about three-quarters through it that that’s what it was about”) and about which is easier to write about, vices or virtues (“Oh, vices. Vices are much more interesting. Misdeeds—they interest us”).

The bookstore grew warm, those standing shifted from foot to foot, but nobody wanted to leave. Baxter wrapped things up. He looked out at the crowd, at his brother, his daughter-in-law, his students, his colleagues, his fellow writers, and his friends.

“I’m going to be on this book tour for some time,” he said, “and I just have to say I don’t expect ever to be in a room with so many people I care about. So, thank you. Thank you.”

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