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Netrebko sings Lady Macbeth, live from the Met in HD

Posted by: Claude Peck Updated: October 6, 2014 - 3:59 PM
Anna Netrebko as Lady Macbeth at the Metropolitan Opera. Photo by Hiroyuki Ito.

Since making her Met debut in 2009 in Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor," Russian soprano Anna Netrebko has sung regularly on the Met stage, and on the popular livecasts from the Metropolitan Opera.

This Saturday (noon, Oct. 11), Netrebko will appear as Lady Macbeth live in "Macbeth," Verdi's opera based on Shakespeare's blood-soaked tragedy. Her Macbeth is Ċ½eljko Lucic in a production that also stars Joseph Calleja as Macduff and René Pape as Banquo. Fabio Luisi conducts this revivial of Adrian Nobles' modern-dress 2007 production.

Netrebko gave a "riveting performance dispatched with artistry and fearless intensity," said the critic at Bloomberg news. In a recent interview, Netrebko talked about the challenges she faces as she takes on more dramatic opera roles.

In recent years, Netrebko has sung in such Met operas as "Lammermoor" (2009), "Don Pasquale" (2010), "L'Elisir d'Amore" (2012) and "Eugene Onegin" (2013).

For these events, crowds gather at movie theaters across the United States on Saturday afternoons to watch and hear big-name singers in big-deal operas, without having to pay for trips to New York City and tickets to the Opera House at Lincoln Center. The live telecasts are usually repeated in the evening on the following Wednesday.

To get tickets for this Live in HD event, which is beaming to seven metro-area movie theaters on Saturday, go here. Next up, on Oct. 18, is Mozart's "Le Nozze di Figaro," conducted by James Levine.

'The Nance,' starring Nathan Lane, coming to PBS

Posted by: Claude Peck Updated: October 3, 2014 - 5:11 PM

"The Nance," starring two-time Tony winner Nathan Lane as a bawdy gay entertainer in the waning days of burlesque in New York City, is coming to "Live from Lincoln Center" on PBS.

Locally, TPT, Channel 2, airs it at 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 10.

The show, which played at the Lyceum Theatre on Broadway in 2013, tells the story of Chauncey Miles, played by Lane, whose broadly comic stage shows are jam-packed with swishy double entendres that make him a minor star and allow him to fly under the radar until censors take note and pressure theater owners to get rid of Miles and his fellow performers. Offstage, Miles falls in love with Ned (Jonny Orsini), a romance that must be kept secret.

The play takes place in 1937, on a revolving set (by John Lee Beatty) that turns to reveal a burlesque stage, the backstage area, an Automat frequented by gays, and Miles' apartment. Other cast members include Lewis Stadlen, Cady Huffman, Jenni Barber and Andrea Burns. Jack O'Brien directs.

"The Nance," by Douglas Carter Beane, was nominated for five Tony Awards, including a Best Actor nod for Lane.

McPherson's 'The Night Alive' opens in Chicago

Posted by: Claude Peck Updated: October 2, 2014 - 3:42 PM

Helen Sadler and Francis Guinan in "The Night Alive" at Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago. Set design is by Todd Rosenthal. Photo by Michael Brosilow.

Steppenwolf Theatre, the Chicago playhouse that has a knack for birthing hit plays, some of which have gone on to Broadway runs and Tony wins, just opened "The Night Alive," by Irish playwright Conor McPherson.

I saw the production in previews in September, and can't wait for the play to arrive in the Twin Cities. The Jungle Theater, which has produced such other McPherson plays as "The Seafarer" (2009) and "Shining City (2007), would be great home for this darkly amusing meditation on violence, mortality, charity, friendship, illusion and dreams deferred.

As directed at Steppenwolf by Henry Fishcamper (who is a resident artistic associate at Chicago's Goodman Theatre), "The Night Alive" takes place in the extremely messy, bare bones rented room of Tommy (Francis Guinan, marvelous), whose landlord Uncle Marice is played by veteran character actor M. Emmet Walsh.

One night, Tommy, one of the most lovable losers ever to have graced a stage, brings home Aimee (Helen Sadler), a young woman who has taken a beating. Their growing relationship plays out alongside Tommy's dim sidekick Doc (Tim Hopper), Maurice, and a malevolent Kenneth (Dan Waller).

While the action and plot are wonderfully grounded in quotidian detail -- dented cups of tea, piles of dirty laundry, a travel poster of Finland -- the script leaves open the possibility of multiple metaphoric interpretations. This became abundantly clear in the post-play discussion with Steppenwolf's Martha Lavey and Fishcamper, which raised more questions about the play than were conveniently answered.

Chicago critics praised the play as "raw and beautiful" (Tribune) and said Guinan is "just about perfect as Tommy." (Reader).

"The Night Alive" continues at Steppenwolf through Nov. 16.

Francis Guinan, M. Emmet Walsh and Tim Hopper in Steppenwolf's "The Night Alive," by Conor McPherson. Photo by Michael Brosilow.

"Topless Cellist" biographer to tell all at Walker Art Center

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: September 30, 2014 - 5:54 PM

Joan Rothfuss, author of "Topless Cellist: the Improbable Life of Chralotte Moorman."

Forget Pablo Casals and Yo-Yo Ma. Sure they were, and are, brilliant cellists, but those guys kept their clothes on. For sheer spectacle, madcap antics,exhibitionism and a generous dollop of cello skills, you want Julliard-trained Charlotte Moorman, a gal from Little Rock, AK who grabbed the avant garde by the scruff of its self-absorbed neck and -- in the 1960s and '70 -- dragged it onto the public glare of television variety and talk shows (Mike Douglas, Johnny Carson, Merv Griffin), shopping malls and prisons, and to New York City's Central Park, Shea Stadium and Grand Central Terminal.

In former Walker Art Center curator Joan Rothfuss, Moorman has found her perfect biographer. Rothfuss's "Topless Cellist: The Improbable Life of Charlotte Moorman," (MIT Press, $34.95) is fast paced, thoroughly researched, amusing, witty, compassionate, deeply informed and filled with jaw-dropping stories. Rothfuss will talk about Moorman and sign copies of the book at 2 p.m. October 5 in the Walker Cinema, 1750 Hennepin Av., Minneapolis. Free. 612-375-7600 or www.walkerart.org

Moorman played the cello while suspended from balloons floating over Australia's Sydney Opera House, performed on a cello made of ice, and often did her shows topless, in the buff, wrapped in cellophane, or wearing the "TV Bra," a contraption that sported two mini-televisions, one for each breast, in plexiglass boxes attached to transparent straps.

In February 1967 she was arrested (during a topless performance), tried and, in a sensationalized trial that generated huge publicity, convicted for violating "community standards of decency." Though humiliated by the incident, she embraced the "Topless Cellist" nickname that it spawned.

"TV Bra," was designed and built by Moorman's longtime companion and fellow avant-gardist Nam June Paik and is sometimes blamed for the breast cancer from which she died in 1991, age 57. To test that assumption, Rothfuss had the bra checked by a physicist who measured the radiation it emitted and concluded that it was highly unlikely that Moorman would have gotten cancer as a result of her performances while wearing it. "TV Bra" is now in the collection of Walker Art Center along with Paik's "TV Cello" and other Moorman/Paik memorabilia.

As a friend, colleague, pal and sometimes irritant to many contemporary artists, Moorman is remembered in Rothfuss' book by Yoko Ono, Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow, and others too numerous to mention.

"Topless Cellist" is a brilliant portrait of a true original and the chaotic, confrontational, destructive, absurd era in which she lived. It's also a must read for anyone who was flirting with Artland back then, or wishes they'd been on the scene. A portrait of the times as much as the woman, "Topless Cellist," gives a full measure of a life lived with "extreme passion, extreme sex, extreme beauty." 

RIP Charlotte Moorman, 1933-1991

Minnesota Marine Art Museum expands building and collection

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: September 16, 2014 - 6:11 PM

The Minnesota Marine Art Museum in Winona has added a 5,000 sq. ft. gallery and loans of eight new paintings to its already impressive collection of water-themed art. The new Richard and Jane Manoogian Gallery will officially open to the public Sunday, Sept. 28.

The new paintings include images by English landscape master John Constable (1776-1837), German Expressionist Max Beckmann (1884-1950), American Modernist Stuart Davis (1892-1964), and the romantic American naturalist Martin Johnson Heade (1819-1904) whose "View from Fern-Tree Walk," (1887), above, is a star addition. The pictures are on loan from the museum's founders Robert "Bob" Kierlin and his wife Mary Burrichter.

Detroit-native Richard Manoogian, a prominent collector of American art, is heir to a faucet-manufacturing fortune derived from Masco Corporation which was founded by his father. With support from a foundation established by the Manoogians, the Winona museum added a gallery that will primarily house paintings from its collection and long-term loans of Hudson River School, French and American Impressionist, and European and American modernist paintings.

(10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tues.-Sun., $7 adults. Minnesota Marine Art Museum, 800 Riverview Dr., Winona. 1-507-474-6626 or 1-866-940-6626 toll free; or www.mmaam.org)


 

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