Welcome to Artcetera. Arts-and-entertainment writers and critics post movie news, concert updates, people items, video, photos and more. Share your views. Check it daily. Remain in the know. Contributors: Mary Abbe, Aimee Blanchette, Jon Bream, Tim Campbell, Colin Covert, Laurie Hertzel, Tom Horgen, Neal Justin, Claude Peck, Rohan Preston, Chris Riemenschneider, Graydon Royce, Randy Salas and Kristin Tillotson.

Garrison Keillor to have surgery

Posted by: Neal Justin under Local TV and radio Updated: September 4, 2014 - 3:13 PM

Garrison Keillor/ Star Tribune photo

Garrison Keillor announced Thursday that he'll be having a medical procedure on Sept. 25 that will force him to cancel a Sept. 27 edition of "A Prairie Home Companion."

Keillor, 72, wasn't specific about the operation, but did say this in a statement:

"I now know more about the prostate than I ever wanted to," he said. "If you've noticed my upstairs bathroom light go on at 10 p.m., 10:10, 10:25, 10:40, etc., you know all you need to know. It's no way to live, so I've found an excellent surgeon who will fix everything, and by October, I will be thinking more about truth and beauty and less about plumbing."

The Sept. 20 season kick-off and street dance will go on as scheduled, as will a tour that includes stops in Minneapolis, Duluth and Rochester.

Park Square will open second stage Oct. 24

Posted by: Graydon Royce under Theater, Behind the scenes, Theaters Updated: September 3, 2014 - 5:05 PM

Richard Cook, kneeling in blue jeans, is leading the Park Square project for its second stage/photo by Petronella Ytsma

Park Square Theatre's second stage -- long anticipated -- should be finished in mid-October. The theater announced Wednesday that the 204-seat thrust will open with "The House on Mango Street" (in previews) on Oct. 24. The production will run through Nov. 9, directed by Dipankar Mukherjee.

The thrust, named for benefactor Andy Boss, is projected to cost $3.5 million and is set up to be independent of the main stage, with its own ticket office, lobby, galleries, rehearsal hall and dressing rooms. Nine productions are scheduled for the 2014-15 season, including six by Park Square. Partner companies Sandbox, Theatre Pro Rata and Girl Friday will provide the other shows.

Park Square still needs to raise $285,000 for the project.

"This is an incredibly exciting time for us," said artistic director Richard Cook in a statement. "This is the fourth theater space I've had a hand in creating for Park Square since 1975."

Cook always has been a master of building his theater cautiously and carefully but then understanding when it's time to make a bold move. And adding a 204-seat stage is pretty bold. That's bigger than the Jungle and roughly the size of Mixed Blood and the Guthrie studio. Cook has programmed 18 productions in his two stages this season. Park Square's attendance goal is 90,000.

James Sewell working on ballet with filmmaker Frederick Wiseman

Posted by: Claude Peck under Behind the scenes, Culture, Dance, Minnesota artists, Movies, People Updated: September 3, 2014 - 3:14 PM
James Sewell of Sewell Ballet / Star Tribune photo by Tom Wallace

In what may seem like an odd pairing, James Sewell of the Minneapolis-based Sewell Ballet is working with veteran documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman on a new ballet based on an old Wiseman movie.

Wiseman's 1967 "Titicut Follies" documented the residents and inmates at Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Bridgewater, Mass.

This early Wiseman documentary ignited controversy when state authorities sought to prevent its release, saying it violated inmates' privacy. The legal case rolled through various jurisdictions, but the film was withheld from distribution for years. Wiseman went on to wide fame for his fly-on-the-wall documentaries on a variety of subjects, including high-school life, meat, public housing, boxing and, in two movies, the world of dance.

Fast forward to 2014, when a new Center for Ballet and the Arts is set to open at New York University. Wiseman is among the center's first group of fellows. He announced this week that as part of that fellowship he is planning a ballet based on the film, to be created by choreographer Sewell.

Sewell said Wednesday that he and Wiseman have been talking by phone about the project this summer, and that Wiseman is due in Minneapolis later in September for meetings and in-studio improvisation. Wiseman is a "visionary," Sewell said, "and it extends beyond his medium. We've synthesized how our worlds can connect."

Sewell said the ballet, which may retain the movie's title, is likely to require 10 male dancers, as well as other characters to potray the state hospital's doctors and nurses. Likely to premiere in Minneapolis about two years from now, the ballet will include music and possibly video from the original film, Sewell said.

"When I first saw the film -- so intense, so strange -- I thought, 'how could you make a ballet of this?' But the elements are all there -- humorous, poetic, horrifying, sad," Sewell said.

The movie's title comes from an annual variety show that Bridgewater officials and inmates staged at the hospital. "These violent criminals and mentally ill inmates would put on a show, singing Gershwin with pom-poms in their hands," Sewell said.

While funding and other details remain to be worked out, Sewell said he "could not be happier" about this collaboration, which "dropped in my lap." He hopes to find a way, in dance, to portray "the inner landscape" of the often abused, catatonic or disruptive Bridgewater population.

Wiseman, 84, just won the Golden Lion Career Award at the Venice Film Festival.

Minnesota's Lea Thompson waltzes onto 'Dancing With the Stars'

Posted by: Neal Justin under Dance, Television Updated: September 3, 2014 - 11:44 AM

 

Lea Thompson/photo by Los Angeles Times

Part-time Minnesota resident Kristi Yamaguchi represented our state well in 2008 when she crushed the competition on "Dancing With the Stars."

Now it's Lea Thompson's turn.

The Rochester native will be among the cast members when the show returns Sept. 15. Others in the mix include soap star Antonio Sabato Jr., Janel Parrish ("Pretty Little Liars"), "Duck Dynasty" diva Sadie Robertson and NASCAR driver Michael Waltrip. ABC on Thursday announced the 13 contestants for its fall round of the dancing competition. They also include talk-show host Tavis Smiley, Olympic athlete Lolo Jones and fashion designer Betsey Johnson. Other amateur hoofers include comedy veteran Tommy Chong, YouTube star Bethany Mota, Ultimate Fighting champ Randy Couture, "Mean Girls" star Jonathan Bennett and actor-dancer Alfonso Ribeiro.

The new lineup was unveiled on "Good Morning America."

At 53, Thompson may be among the oldest participants, but don't count her out. She started dancing professionally at the age of 14 and clocked in 45 performances with the American Ballet Theatre. She later focused on acting, landing high-profile roles in "Back to the Future" and "All the Right Moves."

As much as we'll be rooting for Thompson, our early money is on Ribeiro, who danced in Michael Jackson videos as a kid and starred as Carlton Banks on "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air." Remember his "Carlton Dance" everytime Tom Jones' "It's Not Unusual" was played? If he can incorporate those moves into his routines, he's got our vote.

As reported earlier, Thompson may soon be revisiting her Minnesota roots. Her husband, Howard Deutch, is developing a possible series for HBO set in Stillwater.

Includes material from the Associated Press.

"Theater People" is about theater people

Posted by: Graydon Royce under Theater, Behind the scenes, Minnesota artists, Theaters Updated: September 3, 2014 - 12:33 PM

If you have 30 minutes to spare, check out “Theater People,” a web series created by Matthew Anderson. He wrote, directed and edited ten episodes about the drama behind drama. It’s all locally made – which is important these days, right? At least when it comes to garden produce.

Anderson had toiled for many years in the Twin Cities theater market and then took a stab at Los Angeles. He came back but has put his energy behind a camera. The concept here is just to lampoon the quirks and tics of theater life. But it all feels friendly  and cheeky as it lands its punches – kind of like Kate Wetherhead’s “Submissions Only.”

Theaters, private homes and public streets provide cost-free locations and the actors in “Theater People” are doing it mostly for fun.

And it is fun. Stacia Rice and Steve Sweere play former spouses who still run Theatre Unhinged. Sweere is an aging lothario auditioning potential Juliets to his Romeo – but really just trying to make out with young women. Rice’s character watches with simmering but controlled rage. In another scenario, Mark Mattison does a florid and pompous director crafting an original production that he is says is based on the work of Aleister Crowley. Jane Froiland, Jen Rand, Matt Sciple, Katie Willer and Sara Marsh all contribute.

There are ten episodes on the web site, each about eight minutes long. Anderson would like to put together another season and is hoping for some real funding this time. It’s definitely worth having a look and supporting.

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