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Tee time at Walker Art Center in Minneapolis

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: May 6, 2014 - 3:30 PM

University of Minnesota art students designed this distorted room mini golf hole for the 2013 course. Star Tribune photo by Brian Peterson.

Walker Art Center's popular artist-designed mini golf course returns for summer 2014 with fresh novelties (chickens, snake, gumball machine) and old favorites from past seasons including a giant maze, a gopher hole, a watering can and garden gnomes playing foosball. Plan for wait times due to course popularity.

The course will be open daily from May 22  through Sept. 1. Hours: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sunday - Wednesday; 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. Closed June 20 - 22 for Rock the Garden concerts.

Tickets for a full 18 hole round are $18 adults, $15 students, $13.50 ages 7 - 12. For a half-course of 9 holes, fees are $12 adults, $10 students, $9 ages 7 - 12. All tickets include free admission to Walker's galleries. Excellent snacks are for sale at the Dog House cart adjacent to the course.

Call 612-375-7697 for weather-related closing information.

Above: Jan Tank of Milwaukee played the "Garden Gnome Foosball" hole in the 2013 course. Star Tribune staff photo by Rick Sennott.

Above: Nathan Pukal of Plymouth played the Watering Can hole on the 2013 course. Star Tribune staff photo by Brian Peterson.

Above: University of Minnesota art students designed a minature Minneapolis Sculpture Garden hole inside a giant golf ball for the 2013 course. Star Tribune staff photo by Brian Peterson. 

Matisse show hours extended at Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: May 5, 2014 - 6:41 PM
Henri Matisse, "Striped Robe" collection Baltimore Museum of Art

Everybody loves Henri Matisse, the French artist whose life-sized cardboard likeness points the way to his namesake exhibition, "Matisse: Masterworks from the Baltimore Museum of Art" in hallways and lobbies throughout the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. The show has proved to be so popular that the museum has extended the exhibition's hours until 9 p.m. on Friday, May 9; Saturday, May 10, and Friday, May 16.

The show ends Sunday, May 18 which means there are only 12 more days to see it. So, for the record, it will be open as follows: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturday, May 17; 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and on Saturday, May 10.

Tickets are $18 weekdays, $20 weekends and can be reserved at www.artsmia.org or by calling 612-870-3000 or toll-free at 888-642-2787. Tickets may be sold out at peak times and on weekends.

Textile Center in Minneapolis hires interim director

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: April 30, 2014 - 2:01 PM

Textile Center image by Star Tribune staff photographer Bruce Bisping

The Textile Center of Minnesota has hired management consultant Nancy Lee as interim director, a post she is expected to retain for about six months while the organization seeks a permanent leader.

"She's a perfect fit for what we need right now," said Donna C. Peterson, president of the Textile Center's 12 member board. Peterson is a former associate vice president of government and community relations at  the University of Minnesota.

As a consultant, Lee specializes in non-profit management and the development of strategic business plans. She is a former CFO of Minnesota Goodwill and Easter Seals, and a former vice president of the Minnesota Children's Museum.

Lee began work at the Textile Center April 28th. Over the next few months she is expected to oversee the Center's ongoing operations and to assist the board in defining the organizational qualities and expertise needed to run the organization. The difficulty is striking a balance between management skills and knowledge of an artform that encompasses everything from historic rugs to contemporary art clothes.

"We're taking our time to really understand what are strengths and capacitiy are, and to define the profile of our members and potential funders" Peterson said.

The Textile Center is an umbrella organization whose members are professsional and amateur arists engaged in textile crafts ranging from weaving to lace making, batik, knitting, crochetting, custom tailoring, hand dying and doll making.

The non profit organization at 3000 University Av S. E., near the University of Minnesota's Minneapolis campus, has a staff of 14 full and part-time employees and an annual budget of about $800,000. It runs an exhibition gallery and a small shop selling handmade clothing, accessories and textile-related crafts. Its professional services include a library and facilities for dying and weaving textiles, classrooms and meeting spaces for school kids and adults.

Walker Art Center exhibit closes indefinitely to finish building repair

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: April 29, 2014 - 3:40 PM

Rebricked Barnes wing of Walker Art Center; Star Tribune photo by Joel Koyama

Walker Art Center's "Midnight Party" exhibit features paintings, sculptures, films and installations drawn primarily  from the museum's permanent collection. The title derives from a 1938 film by American surrealist Joseph Cornell in which "mystery trumps logic." In a similar vein, the often enchanting exhibit is a marvelous array of strange objects (a stairway to nowhere; mid-century modern abstractions, a bare white room reminiscent of an interrogation chamber).

The show opened in 2011, was reconfigured with new art in 2013, and is officially scheduled to close August 3. However, it has been closed since late March and the Walker has not set a reopening date.

The show is installed in Galleries 4, 5, 6 of the museum's 1971 brick-clad building designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes. The deteriorating brick skin of that building was removed and replaced last year but some finishing touches are still underway.

"Although the scaffolding was removed in December, the final states of the [rebricking] project are still underway including some interior work. . . . As with any project of this scope, the Walker occasionally will close galleries or public areas in order to make a safe work environment for the builders and pleasant experience for our patrons," emailed  Walker spokesperson Meredith Kessler.


 

All night Northern Spark art fest to feature 24-hour film "The Clock"

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: March 27, 2014 - 7:44 PM

Christian Marclay

"Time, time. What is time? Swiss manufacture it. French hoard it. Italians squander it. Americans say it is money. Hindus say it does not exist. Do you know what I say? I say time is a crook," mutters Peter Lorre apropos of absolutely nothing in "Beat the Devil," John Huston's brilliant 1953 parody of crime-sex-comedy-adventure films.

With an all star cast (Humphrey Bogart, Gina Lollobrigida, Jennifer Jones, Robert Morley and others too numerous to mention), the movie is a cult classic that deserves its own little Northern Spark revival just for the delicious pleasure of hearing Lorre's daffy riff on time.

It would be the perfect accompaniment to Christian Marclay's "The Clock," a 24-hour-long work of genius that Walker Art Center plans to run June 14 -15 as part of Northern Spark, the dusk-to-dawn art festival that this year bounces back to Minneapolis after a season in St. Paul.

In "The Clock," Marclay splices together 24 hours of second-by-second images of clocks clipped from other movies, each of them moving inexorably and sequentially through a day and a night and a day again as time passes. There are wrist watches, digital alarms, tower clocks, train-station clocks and more snipped from murder mysteries, romantic comedies, adventure tales and every other type of cinematic encounter in which someone, somewhere glanced at a timepiece while marking time waiting for something to happen.

As "Beat the Devil" screen-writer Truman Capote said, through the lips of Lorre, "Time is a crook."

Walker has booked "The Clock" from 11 a.m. Saturday to 5 p.m. Sunday. That's a long 24 hours, perhaps broken up by popcorn and bathroom breaks?

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