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Posts about Museums

Walker Art Center to publish its collection online in serial format

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: June 30, 2014 - 4:47 PM

Helio Oiticica and Neville D'Almedia's "Block-Experience in Cosmococa--Program in Progress (1973) as seen on a tablet.

In 2005 when Walker Art Center published the most recent catalogue of its 12,000 piece collection, the 616 page volume was years in the making and covered a mere fraction of the center's holdings. Film, video, music, dance and other performance activities--  which are a key part of the Minneapolis' institution's program-- were described but not as thoroughly represented as paintings, sculpture and other objects.

A new "Living Collections Catalogue" aims to be more interactive, flexible, and responsive to the multidisciplinary focus of the collection. The web-based project will be accessible via laptop, smartphone, a tablet computer or other digital devices. Published in serial form, the segments will include documents, original interpretations from scholars commissioned by the Walker, and a variety of media resources about selected work from the collection.

The first segment, "On Performativity," deals with performance-based work in relationship to the visual arts. Scholars Philip Auslander, Shannon Jackson, and Dorothea von Hantelmann provide an overview of contemporary performance. Individual works in the collection are discussed by Elizabeth Carpenter, Eric Crosby, Peter Eleey, Bartholomew Ryan, and Irene Small. Multimedia material enhances their comments.

Artists whose work is explored in "On Performativity" include dancer/choreographer Trisha Brown, installation artist Helio Oiticica, filmmaker Neville D'Almedia, performers Eiko & Koma, mixed media installation artist Tino Sehgal, and an Anthropometry painting by Yves Klein.

The current exhibition "Art Expanded, 1958-1978, will be explored in a future segment.The online catalogue is supported by grants from the Getty Foundation as part of its "Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative (OSCI) which supports similar programs at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Seattle Art Museum and the Tate Gallery.
 

Dancing through a mansion

Posted by: Claude Peck Updated: June 25, 2014 - 4:18 PM
The performers of "KOM HIT!" gather near the end of the piece for an ensemble scene in the Turnblad mansion's small top-floor theater. Photo provided by American Swedish Institute.
 
A young woman, barefoot and wearing all white, invokes the spirit of Sweden's literary hero August Strindberg, then opens the heavy wooden doors of the Turnblad mansion on Park Avenue in Minneapolis to begin "KOM HIT!" In the hour that follows, audience members (no more than 35 will be allowed at each performance) poke their heads into nearly all of the mansion's 33 rooms, where they witness snippets of modern dance, mime, music and a small amount of narration. Don't expect to learn much about Strindberg, as the dance-theater piece is "loosely inspired by," and not directly drawn from his life and obsessions.

While immersive, site-specific dance-theater has been popular in New York and elsewhere for several years, as evidenced by such long-running shows as "Sleep No More" by Punchdrunk Theater, it is more rarely seen in the Twin Cities.

In "KOM HIT!" Audience members, who are encouraged to wear stick-on moustaches a la Strindberg, may wander freely from room to room, up staircases and into hallways. You may be invited into a room for a solo performance by a singer playing electric guitar, or witness a thrashing dancer in a "mad scene" through the window of a what looks like a walk-in closet.

Here a woman gazes at her reflection in a mirror, there a teenaged girl plays electric bass with an angel-wing-wearing guy on the accordion. Feathers drop into the foyer from above. A sad creature writhes alone on a bare wood floor.

The troupe numbers more than 14 performers, but co-creators Sally Rousse and Noah Bremer are showcased in certain "episodes," including a group scene in the American Swedish Institute's top floor that involves posing for photographs and passing through a large picture frame. Well-known Ballet of the Dolls dancer Stephanie Fellner gets a lot to do, and does it well. In the end, however, the piece is more about mood and movement, perhaps the ephemeral nature of souls and old houses, than it is a coherent narrative.

See "KOM HIT!" at 6 and 7:30 p.m. on June 26 and July 1, 3, 8 and 10. $20, 612-871-43907, or go here.

Dancers in a room that also has a visual art exhibit on view. Photo by Claude Peck.

The performances are timed to the opening of a terrific small photo show in the new wing at ASI. Turns out old August S. was both a fashion hound and a fan of selfies (well before the term came into vogue, and almost at the dawn of photography itself). The photos of Strindberg come from Fotografiska, Sweden's preeminent photo museum.

 
 
Strindberg
 
"KOM HIT!" dancer on the rooftop of the new wing of the American Swedish Institute.
 
Dancer on the mansion's second floor.
 
Below, trailer for "KOM HIT"

J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr. to play Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Posted by: Tim Campbell Updated: June 10, 2014 - 5:35 PM

J Mascis (provided by MIA)

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts has once again turned to a '90s indie-rock hero for its fledging contemporary music series Sound.Art.MIA.

Guitar hero J Mascis, longtime frontman of Dinosaur Jr., will play the MIA Oct. 9, midway through a fall tour to promote his second solo album, "Tied to a Star." Tickets for the concert, co-sponsored by 89.3 the Current, are $20 and go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday via the MIA's ticketing site.

The MIA launched its concert series in February with Mascis' fellow "1991: The Year Punk Broke" veteran Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth, who played a roaring show of guitar duets with Bill Nace in the museum's cavernous Michael Graves-designed Reception Hall -- a setting more suited to wine, cheese and cocktail chat.

Earplugs are advised -- fans are probably still bleeding out from Dino Jr.'s most recent local concerts at First Ave and the Triple Rock. But this time out Mascis may well stick to acoustic guitar, based on a listen to the strummy new song "Every Morning" (released Tuesday along with his tour itinerary) as well as the 7th Street Entry show he played in 2011 behind his first solo effort.

Mascis talks (a little, sort of) about the new album, scheduled for release in August, in this trailer from Sub Pop Records.

About time: Walker's Summer Music & Movies 2014 lineup announced

Posted by: Chris Riemenschneider Updated: May 8, 2014 - 2:30 PM
Har Mar Superstar beat the summer heat in a prior year of the Walker's Summer Music & Movies series. / Jeff Wheeler, Star Tribune

Har Mar Superstar beat the summer heat in a prior year of the Walker's Summer Music & Movies series. / Jeff Wheeler, Star Tribune

One of the Walker Art Center’s most popular programs, the Summer Music & Movies series will return just in time to have a little fun with time. The movies selected in this year’s newly announced lineup -- happening Mondays in August in Loring Park -- all have to do with watching the clock in one form or fashion, which is a tie-in with the Walker’s upcoming exhibit “Christian Marclay: The Clock.”

A punk-inspired visual artist who has collaborated with members of Sonic Youth and John Zorn, Marclay himself will be involved with the music on the last night of the series when it moves to the Walker’s Open Field. Local art-punk band the Cloak Ox will kick off the series, and another homegrown talent, Minneapolis rapper Greg Grease, will perform the second week with his new Afro-electronic band ZuluZuluu. Chicago-reared husband/wife Americana duo the Handsome Family is lined up for the third week. Here’s the full schedule:

Greg Grease / Star Tribune file

Greg Grease / Star Tribune file

Mondays, August 4–25, Free
Music begins at 7 pm; movies begin at dusk (approximately 8:45 pm)
Loring Park August 4, 11, 18   
Walker’s Open Field August 25
In case of rain, events move to the Walker Cinema.
 
August 4
Music: The Cloak Ox
Movie: "High Noon"
 
August 11
Music: ZuluZuluu
Movie: "D.O.A."
 
August 18
Music: The Handsome Family
Movie: "Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb"
 
August 25
Music + Film: Christian Marclay’s "Graffiti Composition and Screen Play" with Laurent Estoppey, Ikue Mori, and Anthony Coleman
Introduction by Christian Marclay
Walker Open Field
 

Tee time at Walker Art Center in Minneapolis

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: May 6, 2014 - 3:30 PM

University of Minnesota art students designed this distorted room mini golf hole for the 2013 course. Star Tribune photo by Brian Peterson.

Walker Art Center's popular artist-designed mini golf course returns for summer 2014 with fresh novelties (chickens, snake, gumball machine) and old favorites from past seasons including a giant maze, a gopher hole, a watering can and garden gnomes playing foosball. Plan for wait times due to course popularity.

The course will be open daily from May 22  through Sept. 1. Hours: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sunday - Wednesday; 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. Closed June 20 - 22 for Rock the Garden concerts.

Tickets for a full 18 hole round are $18 adults, $15 students, $13.50 ages 7 - 12. For a half-course of 9 holes, fees are $12 adults, $10 students, $9 ages 7 - 12. All tickets include free admission to Walker's galleries. Excellent snacks are for sale at the Dog House cart adjacent to the course.

Call 612-375-7697 for weather-related closing information.

Above: Jan Tank of Milwaukee played the "Garden Gnome Foosball" hole in the 2013 course. Star Tribune staff photo by Rick Sennott.

Above: Nathan Pukal of Plymouth played the Watering Can hole on the 2013 course. Star Tribune staff photo by Brian Peterson.

Above: University of Minnesota art students designed a minature Minneapolis Sculpture Garden hole inside a giant golf ball for the 2013 course. Star Tribune staff photo by Brian Peterson. 

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