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Posts about Museums

Minneapolis Sculpture Garden art to be relocated during $10M renovation

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: February 12, 2015 - 1:42 PM

 

Frank Gehyr's "Glass Fish" sculpture in the Cowles Conservatory at the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden; image provided by Walker Art Center

Art from the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden will be stored or shown at other Twin Cities museums and parks during the garden's $10 million renovation starting in June 2015.

Five of the garden's 40 sculptures, all owned by Walker Art Center, will be loaned to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, or the Gold Medal Park adjacent to theGuthrie Theater near the Mississippi River in downtown Minneapolis. The remainder will be placed in storage during the 18 month renovation.

Three of the loaned sculptures will be transplanted to Gold Medal Park:

1) Brower Hatcher's "Prophecy of the Ancients (1988)," a circle of pillars surmounted by a domed mesh- canopy studded with astrological symbols and glyphs; 2) Mark di Suvero's "Molecule (1977-83)," a wide-legged steel tripod painted bright red; 3) Tony Cragg's "Ordovician Pore (1989)" consisting of metal funnels, rough  balls and a bent droplet cascading over the edge of a stone base.

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts will take in Jacques Lipchitz's "Prometheus Strangling the Vulture II (1944/1953), and the Weisman Art Museum will house Frank Gehry's "Standing Glass Fish (1986)."

The Gehry sculpture, which is presently the centerpiece of the Sculpture Garden's Cowles Conservatory and palm house, is expected to be displayed inside the Weisman whose building was designed by the Los Angeles architect.

The loans are renewable annually for up to five years, after which the agreements will be reevaulated.

The Minnesota legislature has approved $8.5 million to renovate and upgrade the 11 acre garden's infrastructure including irrigation, drainage, walkways, retaining walls and other features. The Mississippi Watershed Management Organization chipped in an additional up to $1.5 million for storm-water-management-systems on the site.

The renovation money went  to the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board which owns the land on which the park sits. Walker Art Center, the adjacent contemporary art organization, owns the sculptures and will pay for their storage, maintenance and relocation costs in conjunction with the temporary hosts of the art.

'Out There' attendance hits record at Walker

Posted by: Graydon Royce Updated: February 3, 2015 - 3:46 PM

 

Pieter Ampe and Guilherme Garrido performed "Still Standing You," in week 2 of Out There/Photo by Phile Deprez

 

Was it the weather? Or has the Walker Art Center finally gotten it right after more than 25 years of running the Out There series. Whatever, the Walker announced that attendance for the four-weekend series of edgy performance art and theater hit a record last month.

The Walker sold 3,077 tickets to the 12 performances. That compares favorably to last year’s numbers, 1,805 and the previous record of 2,735 in 2012.

Philip Bither, the Walker’s senior curator for performing arts, was understandably pleased that, “So many found the works to be full of new ideas, worthy provocation and sometimes great fun.”

Minneapolis Institute of Arts to extend Friday hours starting Feb. 20

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: January 21, 2015 - 5:00 PM

Fashionistas attended a preview of the Italian Style show at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Photo by Bre McGee.

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts plans to stay open until 9 p.m. on Friday nights starting February 20. It has been open until 9 p.m. on Thursday evenings for years, so the addition of Friday doubles its evening availability.  It is now open until 5 p.m. on Fridays.

Admission is always free.

In the past year the museum jazzed up its Thursday evening programming by featuring local bands, craft beer, games, retro fun, and exhibition-themed events like a fashion show that accompanied the recent "Italian Style," exhibition of post WWII Italian clothing on loan from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

"Thursday's programming will remain lively and very participatory while Fridays will have more of an art opening theme," said Anne-Marie Wagener, the museum's director of press and public relations.

Hours starting February 20: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays. Closed Mondays. Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 2400 3rd Av. S. 612-870-3000 or www.artsmia.org

Vermeer is the surprise guest for Minneapolis Institute of Arts' 100th birthday

Posted by: Tim Campbell Updated: January 16, 2015 - 10:05 AM

(Photo by Renee Jones-Schneider, StarTribune)

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts had promised surprise masterpieces for its centennial celebration, and it delivered a big one Friday, unveiling "Woman Reading a Letter," one of only 34 known works by 17th century Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer.

The oil painting -- an enigmatic gem about 18 inches high and 15 inches wide -- will be shown for a limited time in the museum's Cargill Gallery, just off the main lobby. There is no charge for admission.

The MIA scored this coup via a loan from Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum. It is a prime example of Vermeer's mastery of light and shadow, with the woman's dress rendered in a striking blue  created from lapis lazuli, a semiprecious stone that was imported from Afghanistan, ground into powder and then mixed with oil to make paint.

It's the first of three promised masterpieces on loan that the MIA will be unveiling at unannounced times throughout its centennial year.

Look for a bigger story about the Vermeer later today at startribune.com/art.

British calligrapher Donald Jackson to talk in St. Paul on February 12

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: January 12, 2015 - 6:04 PM

Donald Jackson photo provided by Concordia University

Officially known as scribe and calligrapher to the Crown Office of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Donald Jackson is more familiar in Minnesota as the founder and creative force behind The Saint John's Bible, the first handwritten Bible produced in the past 500 years which was commissioned by and produced for St. John's University in Collegeville, MN.

Jackson will be in the Twin Cities for a presentation at Concordia University in Saint Paul from 7 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. February 12 at the Buetow Music Center Auditorium (Hamline and Marshall Av.). The event is free and seating in the 480 seat auditorium will be on a first-come first seated basis. Expect it to be packed early.

The University is hosting an exhibition of the seven-volume "Heritage Edition" of The Saint John's Bible through the month of February with two of the volumes on view  through July 2015. The Heritage Edition is a facsimile of the handwritten version that Jackson and an international team of calligraphers worked on for more than a decade. The free exhibition is on display in Concordia's Library Technology Center at 1282 Concordia Av., Saint Paul. Exhibit hours: 10 a.m.- 7 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 10 a.m. -3 p.m. Fridays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays; 1 p.m. -7 p.m. Sundays.
 

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