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'American Sniper' widow to share her perspective at Beth El Synagogue

Posted by: Colin Covert Updated: January 20, 2015 - 2:55 PM
Bradley Cooper received an Academy Award nomination for his role as Navy SEAL Chris Kyle in "American Sniper." Keith Bernstein/AP

Bradley Cooper received an Academy Award nomination for his role as Navy SEAL Chris Kyle in "American Sniper." Keith Bernstein/AP

Both "American Sniper," coming off a near-record breaking $90.2 million opening for the three-day weekend, and "Selma," which earned $26.4 million since opening wide three weeks earlier, are history-based films that deal in myths.

"Selma" triggered criticism for portraying President Lyndon Johnson as a slow supporter of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s campaign for black voter rights. Similarly, "American Sniper" has made substantial alterations from its source material, the best-selling memoir by the late Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle. The film shows Kyle fighting a former Olympic marksman in a sharpshooters' battle to the death, though the two never encountered each other in real life. It also created a fictional Iraqi terrorist who murders children with electric drills. Film star, screenwriter and director Seth Rogen on Twitter said it reminded him of a fictional Nazi propaganda film.

Kyle's wife, Taya Kyle, who was interviewed extensively by screenwriter Jason Hall, will share her insights about her husband’s experiences in battle and on the home front, and about the film version of his life story, in an event Feb. 8 at Beth El Synagogue in St. Louis Park.

Jim DeFelice, co-author of "American Sniper," will appear as well at the 7 p.m. event, a part of the synagogue's Heroes Among Us series. Admission is $18 for members of the military, $36 for the general public, $100 for reserved seating and $360 for a VIP meeting with the special guests.

A portion of the proceeds will help underwrite the synagogue’s Minnesota National Guard unit support initiative, benefiting the 34th Combat Aviation Brigade, the 2nd Battalion, 147th Assault Helicopter, and the 204th Area Support Medical Company.

Beth El Synagogue is located at 5225 Barry St. W., St. Louis Park.

Women composers nearly absent in orchestra programs

Posted by: Claude Peck Updated: October 28, 2014 - 2:39 PM

Women composers remain almost entirely unrepresented in the concert programs of major U.S. orchestras, including the Minnesota Orchestra.

That is among findings of a new study by a writer attached to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Ricky O'Bannon pooled the 2014-15 classical concert seasons of 21 orchestras and looked at ages of composers, whether composers were living or dead, and the countries of origin of composers being played.

Female composers represent 1.8 percent of the works performed. When looking at works by living composers, those by women increases to 14.8 percent. The current season at Minnesota Orchestra includes one work by a woman composer in its regular subscription season (Polina Nazaykinskaya's "Winter Bells," Nov. 13-15 ). Two women composers will be played in the Jan. 16 Future Classics program.

The BSO study determined that the average date of all compositions performed is 1886, and that 9.5 percent of all music performed was composed since 2000. American composers made up less than 11 percent of pieces performed. Additional details are illustrated below. 

McPherson's 'The Night Alive' opens in Chicago

Posted by: Claude Peck Updated: October 2, 2014 - 3:42 PM

Helen Sadler and Francis Guinan in "The Night Alive" at Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago. Set design is by Todd Rosenthal. Photo by Michael Brosilow.

Steppenwolf Theatre, the Chicago playhouse that has a knack for birthing hit plays, some of which have gone on to Broadway runs and Tony wins, just opened "The Night Alive," by Irish playwright Conor McPherson.

I saw the production in previews in September, and can't wait for the play to arrive in the Twin Cities. The Jungle Theater, which has produced such other McPherson plays as "The Seafarer" (2009) and "Shining City (2007), would be great home for this darkly amusing meditation on violence, mortality, charity, friendship, illusion and dreams deferred.

As directed at Steppenwolf by Henry Fishcamper (who is a resident artistic associate at Chicago's Goodman Theatre), "The Night Alive" takes place in the extremely messy, bare bones rented room of Tommy (Francis Guinan, marvelous), whose landlord Uncle Marice is played by veteran character actor M. Emmet Walsh.

One night, Tommy, one of the most lovable losers ever to have graced a stage, brings home Aimee (Helen Sadler), a young woman who has taken a beating. Their growing relationship plays out alongside Tommy's dim sidekick Doc (Tim Hopper), Maurice, and a malevolent Kenneth (Dan Waller).

While the action and plot are wonderfully grounded in quotidian detail -- dented cups of tea, piles of dirty laundry, a travel poster of Finland -- the script leaves open the possibility of multiple metaphoric interpretations. This became abundantly clear in the post-play discussion with Steppenwolf's Martha Lavey and Fishcamper, which raised more questions about the play than were conveniently answered.

Chicago critics praised the play as "raw and beautiful" (Tribune) and said Guinan is "just about perfect as Tommy." (Reader).

"The Night Alive" continues at Steppenwolf through Nov. 16.

Francis Guinan, M. Emmet Walsh and Tim Hopper in Steppenwolf's "The Night Alive," by Conor McPherson. Photo by Michael Brosilow.

Steve Perry of Journey unexpectedly sings with Eels in St. Paul

Posted by: Jon Bream Updated: May 27, 2014 - 1:07 AM

Just when you thought some obsessive documentarian might make a film called “Searching for Steve Perry,” the reclusive former Journey frontman showed up unexpectedly Sunday night at the Fitzgerald Theater during the second encore of the Eels concert.

Perry, who apparently hadn’t performed in public since 1996, sang three numbers, including the Journey smashes “Open Arms” and “Lovin Touchin Squeezin.”

Perry, 65, didn’t have his heyday mullet but he did showcase his high, piercing voice, which, judging by the YouTube video, is not as high as it used to be – nor as high as that of current Journey singer Arnel Pineda.

No idea what the connection between Perry and the Eels is.

In other Journey-related news, Neal Schon and Gregg Rolie – original members of Journey—will get together with Carlos Santana and others for a reunion of the original Santana band, the bandleader told Rollingstone.com. He credited Schon, the current Journey guitarist, with pushing for the reunion. They are recording new material for “Santana IV” (since they made three albums together) and talking of a possible tour.

Prince explains himself, sorta, to London press about suing fans

Posted by: Jon Bream Updated: February 5, 2014 - 1:36 AM

Photo provided by Fox TV

On the eve of his multi-venue tour in London, Prince held a news conference Tuesday – in the living room of British singer Lianne La Havas, whom he met when she performed in the States.

With about a dozen people in the room, he talked about his love of tea, something he shares with La Havas.

OK, to the important stuff, courtesy of the Associated Press.

On why he recently sued fans whose Facebook pages were selling bootlegs

"Nobody sues fans. It's just a poor way to phrase it. A bootlegger is a bootlegger, a scalper is a scalper. They know what time it is. Just sharing music with each other — that's cool. It's the selling that becomes the problem."

On whether he’ll play England’s famous Glastonbury Festival in June

"I can't think of the festival now."

On how he feels about this summer’s 30th anniversary of his hit movie and soundtrack, “Purple Rain”

"I don't look back”

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