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Posts about Galleries

Minneapolis Institute of Arts to show reproduction paintings on Minneapolis streets

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: April 23, 2015 - 6:45 PM

Rembrandt's "Lucretia"

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts will place high-quality reproductions of four of its paintings outside Minneapolis stores and businesses during May. Museum docents will be on site sharing anecdotes and answering questions about the art from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. each Saturday, weather permitting.

The project is part of the MIA's 100th birthday celebration. The reproductions will appear about May 1 and will be moved to new sites at the middle of the month. The first round will feature the following pictures at these locations:

Rembrandt's "Lucretia" at Bobby and Steve's Auto World. As there are several Bobby and Steve's in Minneapolis, the promise of a "Lucretia" sighting is perhaps an enticement to visit them all in hopes of spying her. One of the MIA's most famous pictures, "Lucretia" depicts a Roman noblewoman committing suicide to salvage her honor after having been raped.

Monet's "Grainstack, Sun in the Mist," at U.S. Bank, 2420 Hennepin Av. in Uptown. Shimmering with sunny pinks at sundown, the picture features a huge muffin-shaped stack of wheat in a French meadow.

Van Gogh's "Olive Trees," at the Minneapolis Central Library, 300 Nicollet Mall in downtown MInneapolis.  A typically turbulent Van Gogh image, "Olive Trees" shows gnarled and twisted trees sweltering in the midday sun.

Chaim Soutine's "Carcass of Beef," at Kramarczuk's Deli, 215 E. Hennepin in Northeast Minneapolis. One of the more inspired pairings of art and enterprise, this places the Russian-born artist's expressively brutal image of a flayed carcass at a meatmarket famous for delicious sausage and other Eastern European delicacies linked to its founder's Ukrainian heritage.

The reproductions will be moved later to the Wedge Table, Loring Park, the Stone Arch Bridge and the Strip Club Meat & Fish. Check out other MIA birthday surprises at the museum's birthday website.
 

Minnesota Museum of American Art names new development director

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: April 7, 2015 - 12:22 PM

Theresa Sweetland, Director of Development and External Relations, Minnesota Museum of American Art

The  Minnesota Museum of American Art (MMAA) in St. Paul has hired Theresa Sweetland as its new Director of Development and External Relations starting April 27. Sweetland has headed the Minneapolis neighborhood organization Intermedia Arts for the past six years, serving there in the dual role of Executive/Artistic Director.

In a valedictory announcement, Intermedia board chair Andrea Jenkins credited Sweetland with having "successfully revived [Intermedia]  from near death in 2009 to our current position of strength and impact." Intermedia immediately named Julie Bates MacGillis to be the organization's acting executive director for the next six months while the board searches for a new director. A writer and spoken-word poet, Bates MacGillis is presently the Associate Director of Intermedia. She also recently received a Joyce Grant from the Arts Professional Development Fund for Emerging Leaders of Color.

At the MMAA Sweetland is expected to strengthen ties to the institution's current funders, solicit new revenue, increase the museum's membership, and broaden its visibility through marketing and communications.

The MMAA now presents temporary exhibitions of new work by Minnesota-based artists in a "Project Space" that's open three days a week (Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays) in the historic Pioneer Endicott Building near Lowertown. The site is adjacent to the Green Line of the light rail system connecting St. Paul and Minneapolis.

Most of the museum's 4000 piece collection is presently in storage or on loan to exhibitions that travel the region. It organized the show "Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison" which is on view at the Minnesota History Center through April 26.

Ace gallery director Dyani White Hawk Polk resigns AMRG post

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: March 10, 2015 - 2:20 PM

Artist and gallery director Dyani White Hawk Polk with artist Greg Bellanger at All My Relations Gallery; Star Tribune staff photo by Joel Koyama.

Award winning artist and curator Dyani White Hawk Polk has unexpectedly resigned her post as director of All My Relations Gallery (AMRG) in south Minneapolis, effective March 17.

During her four year tenure at AMRG, she combined inclusiveness and administrative savvy with a keen eye for top quality contemporary and traditional American Indian art, the gallery's speciality. Drawing on national contacts, she organized handsome shows of contemporary sculpture, paintings and installations as well as traditional beadwork, birch-bark containers, grass baskets, ledger drawings and jewelry.

Leading AMRG was "an unexpected turn in my career," White Hawk Polk said in an email announcing her plans. It had been "a joy, inspiration, and blessing" to work with the gallery's artists and supporters, she said, but now it was time to "make the leap and transition into a full-time studio practice, chasing my own dream as an artist."

A Sicangu Lakota from Madison, Wisconsin, White Hawk Polk has won awards for her own work at the prestigious Santa Fe Indian Art Market and a 2013-14 fellowship in visual art from the McKnight Foundation. Her paintings deftly incorporate Indian motifs (feathers, moccasin shapes) into modernist designs that have been shown at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Bockley Gallery and elsewhere.

After her departure, AMRG's operations will be overseen by Jay Bad Heart Bull, president and CEO of the Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI), and Graci Horne, gallery associate. The gallery is located in a sunny street-level showroom in the headquarters of NACDI at 1414 E. Franklin Av., Minneapolis.


 

Northeast Minneapolis Arts District wins "Best" award from USA Today

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: March 6, 2015 - 4:12 PM

Gallery owner Anita Sue Kolman carries a painting by Patrick Kemal Pryor in their jointly-managed Kolman Pryor Gallery at the Northrup King Building in Northeast Minneapolis. Star Tribune photo by Marlin Levison.

The Northeast Minneapolis Arts District topped a USA Today reader's choice competition to claim the title "Best Art District," beating out nine other unnamed cities with pretentions to the title. Voting was conducted over a four-week period. Swinging Northeast was entered into the competition by Lindsay Pollock, editor in chief of Art in America magazine, and Joe Lewis, an art professor at University of California, Irvine.

A recent cruise through USA Today's crowded website of Reader's Choice categories didn't turn up any other contenders in the "Best Art District" award category. But maybe the site was having an off moment. Who knows?

In any case, there were many other "Best" categories on which dedicated USA Today readers might vote, among them: Best US Water Parks, Best Budget Hotel Brands, Best Birdwatching Sites, Best Breweries, Best National Monument, Best Gluten-Free Baked Goods.

You get the picture. Jump in and tout your favs. Maybe they too can share the glory with the Northeast Minneapolis Arts District.
 

Weisman Art Museum showcases 20th century talent, gifts

Posted by: Mary Abbe Updated: February 27, 2015 - 6:06 PM

In two small exhibitions, the University of Minnesota's Weisman Art Museum showcases gifts of 20th century sculpture, prints and drawings from Minneapolis collectors Lillian (Babe) and Julius Davis, and topical sculpture by Hungarian-born emigre Peter Dallos.

The Weisman overlooks the Mississippi River at 333 E. River Road, Minneapolis on the East Bank campus of the University of Minnesota. (10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Tue., Thu., Fri.; 10 a.m.- 8 p.m. Wed.; 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. Sat., Sun.; closed Mondays. Free. 612-625-9494 or www.weisman.umn.edu)

"Acid Rain" by Peter Dallos.

Selections from "The Struggle" series by Peter Dallos: As a child in Hungary, Dallos survived the German occupation, the siege of Budapest and the Holocaust. Then came the repressive post war occupation by the Soviet Union. After the Hungarian revolution in 1956, he escaped and emigrated to the United States where he settled in Chicago. He is now an emeritus professor of neuroscience at Northwestern University.

Only fragments of his improbable and ultimately fortunate life are evident in the small, wall-hung sculptures on display at the Weisman. Part of a series Dallos calls "The Struggle," the polished steel and rough metal objects suggest the tensions between order and chaos, civilization and anarchy, rebirth and environmental degredation that are omnipresent in human society.

An earlier series called "War" more directly alluded to the horrors of W.W. II and the existential alienation that followed. Dallos' entire "War" series is now in the permanent collection of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D. C. (February 14 - March 22, 2015).

"Element Bleu 1" by Jean Dubuffet.

Artful Giving: Lillian (Babe) and Julius Davis: Longtime supporters of both Walker Art Center and the Weisman, the late Babe and Julius Davis were avid collectors of contemporary art as well. Between 1975 and 2013, they gave more than 85 artworks to the Weisman, virtually all of them dating from the post - W.W. II era when they were most deeply engaged in collecting.

Their taste ran to abstract and somewhat conceptual pieces including lithographs for unrealized sculpture projects by Robert Morris and a wall-hung sculpture by French artist Jean Dubuffet made of polyester resin covered with acrylic paint. Dubuffet made it based on doodles he scribbled while talking on the telephone.

About 15 of the Davis gifts are featured in a small show that offers a tidy sample of leading names of the era including Chuck Close, Helen Frankenthaler, Sol LeWitt, Louise Nevelson, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, Jonathan Borofsky, Sol LeWitt, Bruce Nauman, George Segal, Brice Marden, James Kielkopf and Takeshi Kawashima. (February 28 - August 9, 2015)

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