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Justin: 'Breaking Bad' ends so good

Posted by: Neal Justin under Television Updated: September 30, 2013 - 9:10 AM

Aaron Paul (left) and Bryan Cranston in series finale of "Breaking Bad"/photo by Ursula Coyote

Badfinger's "Baby Blue" will never sound the same again.

The 1971 rocker, which opens with the line, "Guess I got what I deserve," served as the perfect coda for the perfect conclusion Sunday night of AMC's "Breaking Bad," a series that will assuredly go down as one of the greatest of all time.

We're about to head into spoiler territory, so refrain from reading further if you haven't caught the finale.

Unlike "The Sopranos" and "The Wire," the two other superior dramas of the last 10 years, the "Breaking Bad" finale tied up all its loose ends, leaving the White family financially secure and ridding Albuquerque of its most evil residents and giving Heisenberg one last chance to growl.

There's nothing wrong with ambiguity, but "Breaking" was a different kind of story, one in which each and every action symbolized something with never a wasted line of dialogue or unnecessary camera shot. It demanded a finite ending -- and, boy, did we get it.

Yes, Walter White's dark side came out of hiding from a New Hampshire cabin, but this time he was honest with himself and those around him, no longer justifying his evil actions by insisting it was all for his family.

"I did it for me," he finally confesses to his wife, Skylar, in their emotional farewell to one another. "I liked it. I was good at it and I was really alive."

His final act of revenge may have seemed over the top for some, but the important element of the scene is that, in the end, he saves Jesse Pinkman, finally freeing him from his grasp as he awaits death in the meth lab that both saved and doomed him.

Creator Vince Gilligan said he wanted to create a sympathetic character that, eventually, every viewer would come to despise. But in the end, Gilligan couldn't quite go through with it. You actually felt for White as the police sirens wailed in the background -- even as you knew that dirty bastard deserved to die.

What did YOU think? DId it fall short of your expectations or is it the greatest ending ever?

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