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Twin Cities performers among MAP grant winners

Posted by: Claude Peck under Music, Theater, Culture, Dance, Funding and grants, Minnesota artists, Museums, People Updated: April 3, 2012 - 6:04 PM

 

Dancer/choreographer Emily Johnson, a MAP grant winner, in a 2010 performance titled "The Thank You Bar." / Photo by Cameron Wittig

The MAP Fund, a grant-making group funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, has awarded more than $1.2 million to support 41 cutting-edge performance projects in dance, theater and music in the United States, including four based in Minneapolis.

A panel chose the winners from more than 800 submissions. Each winner receives between $10,000 and $45,000. Winners may also receive up to $12,000 in general operating money to support their organization. The MAP Fund has disbursed more than $24 million to 900 performing-arts projects since it began in 1989.

Twin Cities-based winners this year are:

Pilsbury House
Minneapolis, MN
Sharon Bridgforth
River See, a performance set along the Mississippi delta, on a juking boat, in the backwoods, during ritual.

Springboard for the Arts for Emily Johnson
Minneapolis, MN
Niicugni (Listen), a performance—housed within an installation of hand-made, functional fish-skin lanterns—that equates the land we live on with the cells in our bodies.

Springboard for the Arts for Karen Sherman
Minneapolis, MN
One with Others, a group dance about biography, self-determination and communication.

Walker Art Center for Otto Ramstad and Olive Bieringa

Minneapolis, MN

Super Nature is a dance that engages the wild, the domestic, and the civilized aspects of human nature.

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