Two of the biggest names in comics are telling DC Comics’ next Swamp Thing tale.

Writer Brian Azzarello and artist Greg Capullo are the creative team featured in the “Swamp Thing Halloween Horror” special one-shot.

The book is part of DC’s series of 100-page, large-format editions that are available only at Walmart. It will also include classic Swamp Thing tales such as the character’s first appearance in “House of Secrets” No. 92 by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson and stories from previous Halloween specials by Denny O’Neil, Neal Adams, Paul Dini, Dustin Nguyen, Dan DiDio, Ian Churchill, J. Michael Stracyznski and more.

Capullo, known to DC fans for his art contributions on “Batman” with writer Scott Snyder, had the chance to draw Swamp Thing during their recent “Metal” miniseries for DC. He’d been itching for the chance to draw the character again and made DC aware. He’d assumed he’d get to eventually work on DC’s green giant down the road with Snyder, but DiDio, DC’s co-publisher, called Capullo and offered him the one-shot assignment with Azzarello, and Capullo couldn’t say no.

Capullo, who began to make a name for himself in comics illustrating “Spawn” for Image, says he’s always up for creating something scary.

“It’s monsters, right?” Capullo said. “Anytime you draw monsters is fun. Especially because you can’t get them wrong.”

This new one-shot tale will be the first time both Capullo and Azzarello (known for DC Vertigo’s “100 Bullets” and the recent “Batman: Damned” from DC’s Black Label imprint) will be working with Swamp Thing, as well as the first time the two have worked together in comics.

“It takes place on Halloween —[DC] was pretty adamant they wanted it to take place on Halloween,” Azzarello said. “It’s a story of a witch who comes across some kids in the woods and she tells them a story to scare them and Swamp Thing is involved in the story.”

Capullo vividly remembers buying his first Swamp Thing comic on a spinner rack in a drugstore and says DC’s new Walmart format will hopefully bring in new readers that may not have access to comics by specialty store or digitally.

“Any venue that gives accessibility [to comics] is thumbs up for me,” said Capullo.