Business Highlights

  • Article by: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS , Associated Press
  • Updated: September 2, 2014 - 4:45 PM

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It's no longer safe to recline your airplane seat

NEW YORK (AP) — Squeezed into tighter and tighter spaces, airline passengers appear to be rebelling, taking their frustrations out on other fliers.

Three U.S. flights made unscheduled landings in the past eight days after passengers got into fights over the ability to recline their seats. Disputes over a tiny bit of personal space might seem petty, but for passengers whose knees are already banging into tray tables, every inch counts.

There are fights over overhead bin space, legroom and where to put winter coats.

Airlines today are juggling terror warnings in Britain, the Ebola outbreak in Africa and an Icelandic volcano erupting and threatening to close down European airspace. Yet, the issue of disruptive passengers has captured the world's attention.

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In light of celebrity hacks, how to protect data

NEW YORK (AP) — The circulation of nude photographs stolen from celebrities' online accounts has raised questions about the security of storing information over the Internet.

Apple acknowledged Tuesday that computer hackers broke into the accounts of several celebrities, a security breakdown that Apple blamed on the intruders' ability to figure out passwords and bypass other safeguards.

Apple says it found no evidence of a widespread problem in iCloud or its Find my iPhone service. Instead, the affected celebrity accounts were targeted by hackers who had enough information to know the usernames, passwords and answers to personal security questions designed to thwart unauthorized entries, according to Apple. Knowing this crucial information would enable an outsider to break into Apple accounts, including iCloud.

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Some fear auto industry returning to bad habits

DETROIT (AP) — Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past.

As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road.

Vehicle discounts have risen 5.5 percent from a year ago. More than a quarter of new buyers are choosing to lease, a historically high percentage. Auto company lending arms are making more loans to people with low credit scores. The industry is adding factory capacity. And the average price of a car keeps rising, forcing some customers to borrow for longer terms to keep payments down.

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Halliburton reaches $1B Gulf oil spill settlement

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