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Continued: As organic goes mainstream, consumers can expect price breaks

  • Article by: JOHN EWOLDT , Star Tribune
  • Last update: May 11, 2014 - 7:24 PM

“People who buy organic want to know the story behind their food — who’s producing it and where, or how the animals are treated,” he said. “The nature of private labels is ­anonymous.”

Despite its success over the past decade, no one expects organics to overtake conventional soon. Only 1 percent of global agricultural land is certified organic, and it takes three years before land can be declared certified. U.S. organic food sales were $35 billion in 2013 according to the USDA, but it represented less than 5 percent of total at-home food sales.

Organic sales are expected to grow 14 percent annually through 2018, according to a TechSci Research Report, but Kastel thinks it depends on ­factors beyond price alone. “The economy, a food recall or the next Alar scare can make a big difference,” he said.

 

John Ewoldt • 612-673-7633







 

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