Trevor Cook’s $194 million Currency Fraud

  • Trevor Cook, a former Apple Valley money manager with a penchant for strong drink and loose women, ran a Ponzi scheme that lured more than 700 investors to the foreign exchange market on promises of safety and liquidity. Cook was sentenced in August 2010 to a 25-year sentence, and several of his former partners have been charged in an alleged conspiracy with tentacles that reached out to Europe, the Middle East, Canada and Central America. Investors, mostly retirees, face grim prospects of recovering more than pennies on the dollar.

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Trevor Cook

Former radio talk show host Pat Kiley

o Beckman says the charges against him are trumped up, and he denies taking investor funds for himself.

  • Casting a wide net

    Article By: RAYMOND GRUMNEY , Publish / Update November 25, 2009 9:33 AM

    This map shows where money, from a currency investment program promoted by some Twin Cities money managers that imploded in July came from. It represents just a portion of the more than 1,000 investors that government regulators say bought into the currency investment.

Durand, Beckman, Kiley

Trevor Cook items

Trevor Cook

Jason Bo-Alan Beckman

Jason Bo-Alan Beckman

Jason Bo Beckman.

Bo Beckman

Jason (Bo) Beckman

Pat Kiley

Trevor Cook

Money seized from home of Trevor Cook's brother, Graham.

6 Cook cars

Trevor Cook

  • Two faces of Trevor Cook

    Article By: DAN BROWNING , Star Tribune Publish January 31, 2010 2:00 AM / Update February 3, 2010 9:30 AM

    Investors trusted him with millions, but the government says he blew their money. He racked up huge gambling losses, hosted drunken parties in his mansion and lavished cash on exotic dancers.

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Pat Kiley, Trevor Cook

The Van Dusen Mansion

Billboard in downtown Panama City

Bo Beckman

Van Dusen mansion

Pat Kiley

Trevor Cook

The Van Dusen Mansion

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