A history of the St. Paul Ford plant

  • Updated: July 16, 2011 - 10:16 PM

1912: Ford starts assembling Model T's in a converted warehouse at 616 S. 3rd St. in Minneapolis.

1914: The Ford Centre is built on 420 N. 5th St. in Minneapolis, and production shifts there.

1923: Attracted by cheap hydropower, Henry Ford starts building the Twin Cities Assembly Plant in St. Paul.

1925: Model T cars and Model TT trucks start rolling off the assembly line.

1933: Great Depression closes plant for two years.

1942-45: Plant converts to defense work, producing armored cars and components for aircraft engines.

1978: Plant converts to all-truck assembly operation.

1999: Ford Ranger trucks peak in popularity, reaching annual sales of 348,000 in North America

2006: Ford Motor Co. announces plans to close the St. Paul plant in 2008.

2007: Ford says plant to close in 2009.

2008: Ford decides to keep producing Ranger pickups at the plant until 2011.

2010: Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and other leaders meet with Ford executive Mark Fields in Dearborn, Mich., in last-ditch effort to keep plant open.

2011: Plant to close in the fourth quarter.

Source: Ford Motor Co., Star Tribune
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