Louis Villaume

Louis Villaume, a lifelong Minnesotan, has been a Vikings fan since the late 1960s. He's also the seventh grade football coach in Rockford and works with the school's varsity team.

Posts about Bernard Berrian

Last-Minute Shopping?

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: September 5, 2010 - 11:11 AM

The cuts are made. Decision 2010 is over. There are not really any surprises, Javon Walker was let go despite two late preseason touchdowns. Sage Rosenfels and Darius Renaud, two players who looked very good in the preseason, find themselves traded to the Giants. Still, Minnesota appears to lack depth at wide receiver and cornerback, where they have an unusually low number kept on this year's roster.

Wide Receivers (5): Percy Harvin, Bernard Berrian, Greg Lewis, and Greg Camarillo. Sidney Rice is on the PUP list, unavailable for the first six games..

Cornerback (5): Asher Allen, Chris Cook, Lito Sheppard, and Antoine Winfield. Cedric Griffin will not start the season in New Orleans, but is expected to return from his ACL injury of last year.

So the question is asked,"What out there?".

As of yesterday's cut there is quite a few wide receivers looking for a home. Included in this group are: T.J. Houshmandzadeh; Demetrius Williams; Chad Jackson; James Hardy; Bobby Engram; Troy Williamson, Josh Reed; Juaquin Iglesias; Kelly Washington; Brandon Jones; Michael Clayton; and Bobby Wade. There are others as well.

One that stands out is T.J. Houshmandzadeh. Before T.J. decided on Seattle it was Minnesota who showed interest in acquiring his talents. They are now available, and possibly a negotiated cheaper price than a few years ago. Ex-Vikings on the list include Williamson, Wade, and Engram. It would not be too big of a stretch to see one of them return, though my money is certain it would not be Troy.

As for defensive backs, the list is just as long. A few of the available DBs have plenty of NFL experience. Included in this list would be: Chevis Jackson; Brandon McDonald; Dre' Bly; Jacques Reeves, Nathan Vasher; Tye Hill; and Quinton Demps. Again, there are plenty more.

The name that jumps out at Vikings' fans is Bly. He had a long career playing for Detroit before ending up with the 49ers. He has forty-three career interceptions. Last year he was credited with sixteen pass defends, twenty-nine tackles, and three interceptions. Obviously there are reasons these DBs are available, but Dre' comes with a pedigree. Nathan Vasher spent six years with the Bears and logged fourteen interceptions. McDonald, let go by the Browns, has eight interceptions in his first three years, along with eleven pass defends last year. Help is there.

Do the Vikings make moves before Thursday's opener? Are they set on the 53 they have? How long until Cedric Griffin becomes the bona fide starter he was in 2009?

The questions mount.

The answers await.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Color Purple Glasses

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: August 30, 2010 - 12:17 PM

The week started with the Indianapolis Colts taking on the despised Green Bay Packers at their home in Wisconsin. I am sure the green and gold faithful are relishing in the endless points they scored. But from my view, I saw just what I wanted to see. Let me explain...

The Colts put seventeen points on the board in fifteen minutes and twenty-one seconds. That is a pace to break sixty, which would have been just enough to eventually win the game. The first Colt score was on a two play, sixty-seven yard drive that took twenty-two seconds. Then a ten play, fifty-five yard drive for a field goal. Finally a six play, seventy-eight yard drive for another td. Sure, it was Peyton Manning, Joseph Addai, and Reggie Wayne. They are very good. But it also was that same defense that surrendered 51 points in their Cardinals wild-card loss in OT last year. Green Bay's defense is suspect.

And both Ryan Grant and Brandon Jackson fumbled the ball. Always good to see. We ignore the fact that Green Bay also moved up and down the field. My glasses must have fogged up.

Meanwhile, the Vikings played Brett Favre into the 3rd quarter with a chance to make friends with new receivers as well as old. First impressions are that Greg Camarillo will be the most dependable receiver on the Vikings squad. He is smart, proven by his ability to find spots in zones quickly and then holding onto the ball. Percy Harvin made some plays and took big hits. He appeared just fine. Visanthe Shiancoe was his usual reliable self. Adrian Peterson also contributed, a sign that he may get more catches than ever before. All good.

The four turnovers by the Favre-led Vikings were caused by two things. One, Bernard Berrian handed the first interception (returned for a td) right to Seattle, coughing up a bobbled ball that hit him in the numbers on a slant. Two, and more important, the offensive line and running backs did not protect Favre well at times. With starting center John Sullivan out, Anthony Herrera moved to center and rookie Chris DeGeare was given a surprise start. It was a work in progress. On one specific fumble, DeGeare tripped over feet (maybe his own?) and fell on his back untouched. Sure Favre let go of the ball a few times, but this is preseason after all.

A Vikings fan (and for sure cheese heads) could view this negatively. Favre is struggling, he is old, he turns over the ball too much. The offensive line is hurting, and suspect for 2010-11. Or, with the prescriptive purple shades, could simply point out it was #4 getting the bugs out, he being in camp for a only a week with new receivers to boot. The line was missing a key ingredient, and this was good for DeGeare's learning curve,

Add positive impressions made by Toby Gerhart (7-30) and the running back/returner Darius Reynaud (3 kick returns, 38.3 average) and one could walk away excited. Antoine Winfield made some big tackles, the rookie cornerback Chris Cook did not get burned (he did get dinged), and Ray Edwards had one of three sacks by the front line. Even Javon Walker made a big play, catching a Sage Rosenfels pass for a late td.

Sure it was only Seattle, and they looked destined for an early draft pick. But when we put on the purple eyewear, it does not matter who the opponent is, or what went wrong. All that matters is that the offense will be Favre-led and the defense as strong as 2009. And we notice things like the Packers defense getting torched for an opening quarter at home.

As plain as the glasses on my face.

 

 

 

Do We Really Need Wide Receivers?

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: August 24, 2010 - 6:27 PM

The news is bleak. Sidney Rice will have hip surgery and is expected to be out eight games. Percy Harvin, dealing with intensive migraines, could be unavailable for some to all of the upcoming season. What ever will the Vikings do? The top receiver in camp is Bernard Berrian, and after that maybe Greg Lewis. Things have soured to the point that the Vikings called in Javon Walker, who did not even play last year. Should we Vikings' fans despair?

Our future may be answered by looking at the ten greatest receivers in our Vikings' history...

10. Hassan Jones. Hassan played 100 games for Minnesota from 1986-1992. He caught 222 passes for 3,733 yards and 24 tds. Jones only saw the NFC Conference Championship once, in 1987 (the strike shortened-season). Jones was on a 1991 team that featured four top ten Vikings' WRs. That team went 8-8.

9. Paul Flatley. Flatey played from 1963 to 1967. Flatley caught 202 passes for 3,222 yards and 17 tds. He was named Rookie Of the year in 1963. He played in the Pro Bowl in 1966. But those were fledgling years for Minnesota and Paul never saw a championship game.

8. Gene Washington. Gene was on the team from 1967 to 1972. Gene played in 81 games, catching 172 passes for 3,087 yards and 23 tds. In 1967 Washington averaged an amazing 29.5 yards per catch as a rookie. He did play in the 1969-70 first Super Bowl loss, averaging over 21 yards a catch. In his final season with Minnesota he was teamed up with another top WR, John Gilliam. That team went 7-7 and was the only non-winning team in a very good stretch.

7. Jake Reed. Jake played from 1991 to 2001. He totaled 134 games, with 413 catches, 6,433 yards and 33 tds. Reed played on two teams that went to the NFC Championship (1998, 2000), but both lost. In those years he teamed with Cris Carter and Randy Moss to form a dangerous trio. Reed never went to a Super Bowl.

6. Sammy White. White played from 1976 to 1985. In 128 games, White caught 393 passes for 6,400 yards and 50 tds. He was a three time All-Pro (1976-1978). He was named Offensive Rookie Of the Year in 1976, the year of the Vikings' last Super Bowl visit. In that year he averaged over 18.0 yards a catch and scored 10 times.

5. Anthony Carter. AC played from 1985 to 1993, totaling 133 games. He caught 478 passes for 7,636 yards and 52 tds. He went to the Pro Bowl three times (1987-89). In his nine years Carter saw the NFC Championship game once, that of the 1987 season, with Hassan Jones. Carter never saw a Super Bowl.

4. John Gilliam. Gilliam only played from 1972 to 1975. In those four years John played in 56 games, he caught 165 passes for 3,297 yards and 27 tds. He was named to the Pro Bowl in each season. Gilliam would be the only elite Vikings' receiver to make it to two Super Bowls (1973-1974). In his first year 1972, John averaged over 22 yards a reception. 

3. Ahmad Rashad. Rashad was a Viking from 1976 to 1982. He played in 98 games, caught 400 passes for 5,489 yards and 34 tds. He was named to four Pro Bowls (1978-1981) and was even named Pro Bowl MVP in 1979. In 1976 Rashad went to the Vikings' last Super Bowl and then was a member of the 1977 team that lost an NFC Championship.

2. Cris Carter. Carter played from 1990 to 2001. Carter played in 188 games. He caught 1,004 passes for 12,383 yards and 110 tds, all team records by far. Carter went to eight Pro Bowls (1993-2000). In 1995 he caught 122 passes for 1,371 yards and 17 tds. Again that team went 8-8. Carter never played in the Super Bowl.

1. Randy Moss. It is hard to believe anyone could outdo Cris Carter in our history, but Moss did. he played in 109 games, caught 574 passes for 9,142 yards and 90 tds. Moss was named Rookie Of the Year in 1998. He went to five Pro Bowls in his seven years. Moss was Pro Bowl MVP in 2000. He was named All-Pro three times (1998, 2000, 2003). Moss made it to two NFC Championships, but Minnesota lost both. Moss' only Super Bowls would be for New England.

What does this tell us? Most of the Vikings' successful teams had a deep threat. In 1969 it was Gene Washington. The 1973-1974 seasons it was John Gilliam, and in 1976 rookie Sammy White. But the most talented years with receivers yielded little accomplishments in the post-season. The 1998-2001 seasons with Randy Moss, Cris Carter and Jake Reed were explosive offensively, but did not provide even a Super Bowl appearance. The stats can be skewed by the fact that losing teams need to pass more, but the numbers suggest a load of talent at receiver is not required for success.

It is hard to compare the success of the 1970s to modern day football. The game has changed, it is far easier to pass the football with the rule changes inhibiting the defensive secondary. But the reality is that the Vikings have not needed elite receivers to be the best team in the NFC. They have typically been a strong defensive team with an ability to run. Chuck Foreman was a member of three NFC Champions. The Purple People Eaters were there.

In 2010, Minnesota is suddenly lacking the production of Percy Harvin and Sidney Rice. Together they teamed for 124 catches for 2,102 yards and 14 tds. Names like Greg Lewis, Taye Biddle, and Freddie Brown are being tossed around as possible new contributors. But one name does remain from 2009: Bernard Berrian. In his two seasons with Minnesota he has had 103 catches for 1,582 yards and 11 tds. His first season he averaged 20 yards a reception. That type of deep threat is just what past Vikings teams have needed to succeed. And Adrian Peterson, Visanthe Shiancoe, the Williams wall, Jared Allen and Ray Edwards are all returning.

Maybe it is the sign of something bigger?

 

 

NFL Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (NPTSD)

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: January 27, 2010 - 4:45 PM

We have suffered. In started in the 1970s, so any Vikings' fans you see who is forty-year old or better wears it on their collective face like cold wind exposure on an Alaskan. Those who are thirty-something cannot hear the name Darren Nelson without thinking of Marcus Allen, discos, and drops. Those in their twenties or late teens can only cringe when the name Gary Anderson is mentioned. And last night was created a whole new generation of sufferers. Adrian Peterson or Brett Favre may have to carry that cross based on early rants from fans.

The reason for the true suffering is the specific event of losing Championship games that could be won. It is one thing to get blown out 41-0 and find out for three hours that you are not ready for the Super Bowl, like in the 2000 season. It is another to lose a close game in the waning moments and/or overtime. NFL Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (NPTSD) occurs when you lose a close game late, that you should have won easily. Vikings Championship losses in seasons 1977, 1987, 1998, and now 2009 qualify as this disturbing of loss in varying degrees.

The numbers of  this Championship hurt the most. Seven times the vaunted NFL's number one offense was three and out. The Vikings were shut down twice. Only three times did the Saints gain ten or more yards on a drive. The Vikings had eight drives of thirty or more yards. Four were seventy-plus yards.The total yardage was nearly double. First downs were more than double. Third down conversions. Drew Brees held to under 200 yards. Most numbers clearly show the Vikings should have won this game. All but turnovers and the final score.

So now those of us with NPTSD will be haunted by fumbles and interceptions. Last night my sleep was limited to four troubled hours full of nightmares in football. The work day was spent in numbing fashion, with thoughts of fright, in hyperarousal, and a heart that feels like it is beating 20-40 times more per minute than it should. I know the physical symptoms will go away. But true NPTSD can re-occur, like a flashback, with all of the same intensity. The 1998 veterans had to relive emotions of an overtime. The older veterans had to think of Brent McLanahan as AP coughed up the ball near the goal line. Like Groundhog Day, we awake to "I Got You Babe".

So what can we NPTSD carriers do? Awareness is half the battle. When I replay in my sleep Robert Meachem being awarded a catch for an obvious trapped ball and wake up in a sweat... relax, breathe. When pictures of the Saints players plastering Brett Favre echo in my mind during the day, I will seek counsel from a friend. Exposure therapy is effective. Go see a fourth grade sporting event, where no one keeps score, and everyone gets a trophy. Work your way through middle school games, clubs, and then beyond. We will get better.

Yes, a new generation of suffering is born. I cannot personally point a finger at any one player. They're my team, win or lose. Brett Favre played the most courageous game I have ever witnessed from quarterback, greater than Archie Manning against the Bears. Adrian Peterson is truly a great back, who is struggling with holding on to the ball. Percy Harvin. Bernard Berrian. How can you fault guys trying too hard? No, in order to recover from NPTSD you have to let go of the blame.

Except for 12 men in a huddle after a time-out.

 

 

 

 

 

NFL Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (NPTSD)

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: January 27, 2010 - 4:45 PM

We have suffered. In started in the 1970s, so any Vikings' fans you see who is forty-year old or better wears it on their collective face like cold wind exposure on an Alaskan. Those who are thirty-something cannot hear the name Darren Nelson without thinking of Marcus Allen, discos, and drops. Those in their twenties or late teens can only cringe when the name Gary Anderson is mentioned. And last night was created a whole new generation of sufferers. Adrian Peterson or Brett Favre may have to carry that cross based on early rants from fans.

The reason for the true suffering is the specific event of losing Championship games that could be won. It is one thing to get blown out 41-0 and find out for three hours that you are not ready for the Super Bowl, like in the 2000 season. It is another to lose a close game in the waning moments and/or overtime. NFL Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (NPTSD) occurs when you lose a close game late, that you should have won easily. Vikings Championship losses in seasons 1977, 1987, 1998, and now 2009 qualify as this disturbing of loss in varying degrees.

The numbers of  this Championship hurt the most. Seven times the vaunted NFL's number one offense was three and out. The Vikings were shut down twice. Only three times did the Saints gain ten or more yards on a drive. The Vikings had eight drives of thirty or more yards. Four were seventy-plus yards.The total yardage was nearly double. First downs were more than double. Third down conversions. Drew Brees held to under 200 yards. Most numbers clearly show the Vikings should have won this game. All but turnovers and the final score.

So now those of us with NPTSD will be haunted by fumbles and interceptions. Last night my sleep was limited to four troubled hours full of nightmares in football. The work day was spent in numbing fashion, with thoughts of fright, in hyperarousal, and a heart that feels like it is beating 20-40 times more per minute than it should. I know the physical symptoms will go away. But true NPTSD can re-occur, like a flashback, with all of the same intensity. The 1998 veterans had to relive emotions of an overtime. The older veterans had to think of Brent McLanahan as AP coughed up the ball near the goal line. Like Groundhog Day, we awake to "I Got You Babe".

So what can we NPTSD carriers do? Awareness is half the battle. When I replay in my sleep Robert Meachem being awarded a catch for an obvious trapped ball and wake up in a sweat... relax, breathe. When pictures of the Saints players plastering Brett Favre echo in my mind during the day, I will seek counsel from a friend. Exposure therapy is effective. Go see a fourth grade sporting event, where no one keeps score, and everyone gets a trophy. Work your way through middle school games, clubs, and then beyond. We will get better.

Yes, a new generation of suffering is born. I cannot personally point a finger at any one player. They're my team, win or lose. Brett Favre played the most courageous game I have ever witnessed from quarterback, greater than Archie Manning against the Bears. Adrian Peterson is truly a great back, who is struggling with holding on to the ball. Percy Harvin. Bernard Berrian. How can you fault guys trying too hard? No, in order to recover from NPTSD you have to let go of the blame.

Except for 12 men in a huddle after a time-out.

 

 

 

 

 

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