Louis Villaume

Louis Villaume, a lifelong Minnesotan, has been a Vikings fan since the late 1960s. He's also the seventh grade football coach in Rockford and works with the school's varsity team.

Posts about Vikings fans

Villaume: Letter From NFC North Jail (6-10 Season)

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: August 1, 2011 - 12:21 AM

Dear fellow Vikings' fans,

It's hot outside. Too hot. I live out in the rural area, where my wife and I assumed a house with a GE heat pump that looks older than me. And we are on off-peak, which means whenever you really need the AC, you cannot have it. Still, recent events cause me too make a stand in saving money. I will not give in. I suffer through this in order to fight injustice, or the rising cost of energy.

Many of you have watched the recent free agent events and made up your minds that more must be done to save the 2011 season. We have to get another quality wide receiver. We have to add an offensive lineman. We have to strengthen our defensive line. Who will play cornerback?

But I am more confident in this year's Vikings already.

First, one of the greatest injustices done to my purple was the giveaway/takeaway ratio. Last year Minnesota ranked dead last in the NFC with a -11. Vikings' passers threw 26 interceptions and ball handlers provided 11 fumbles to the opposition. That type of injustice must end. Brett Favre had a career percentage intercepted (pct. int.) of 3.3, yet last year he was 5.3. Favre would end with a passer rating of 69.9, well below his career average of 86.0

So we have added Donovan McNabb to tutor Christian Ponder and probably lead the 2011 Vikings. McNabb has a career pct. int. of 2.2%. Last year, his worst, he was 3.2% for the Redskins. As bad as McNabb's season was last year, he still had a passer rating significantly higher than Number Four (77.1). McNabb is less likely to be intercepted than Brett Favre.

I am cognizant of the need to improve in other areas. One reason I have so much hope is the work of Coach Dunbar with the Vikings' defensive line. I have been in Dunbar's audience at football clinic;. his presence commands respect. Since he joined the Vikings in 2006 good things have happened. Dunbar, a teammate in college of Henry Thomas and coach in college of Kevin Williams, immediately impacted the Vikings, Minnesota was first against the run in 2006, 07, and 08, becoming only the 2nd team in NFL history to accomplish the feat. Ever since his arrival Minnesota has been known for shutting down the run. In 2010, a down year, the Vikings finished 9th, up from 2nd in 2009.

Moreover, the Vikings have managed a decent pass rush while applying run pressure. In 2009, Minnesota led the NFL in sacks. Jared Allen has had three 14+ sack seasons, one of only a few to ever accomplish the feat. In 2010 Minnesota fell to 15th, though it is difficult for losing teams to acquire sacks. In a land known for great defensive lineman (Page, Eller, Randle, Marshall, Doleman, Millard, Thomas, and so on..), Dunbar has continued to provide. Kevin Williams and Jared Allen are considered among the best in the game.

So fellow fans, there are a few key steps a team must take to enter the playoffs. We must reduce our turnovers. We must provide ample blocking. We must increase our takeaways. And we must apply pressure with the front line.

Donovan McNabb and Christian Ponder will do their best to control the ball. Dunbar and his crew will continue to impress with the front four. Gone are Ray Edwards and Pat Williams. Kevin Williams will have to sit out four games for a delayed suspension. It will be time for newer players to step up. Brian Robison, a 6th year veteran, will be asked to start at DE. Recently signed Fred Evans, Letroy Guion, and rookie Christian Ballard will man the middle until at least one Williams comes back. DE Everson Griffin, the 4th round pick of 2009, and NT Remi Ayodele, a Saints castaway, will also provide efforts.

Given the last five year history, I have no doubt the d-line will provide. The rest is up to the offense. If they can control the ball and score a bit, it could be a much quicker recovery than the pundits would expect. Percy Harvin and Adrian Peterson can help ease the transition to an explosive offense that holds onto the ball.

And despite the summer heat index, I remain cool in thought. Justice can be served by Minnesota in 2011 if they learn to hold onto the ball. And with the Packers hordes gloating (as they should) since the last Super Bowl; it can come none too soon. Maybe by saving money (enduring the heat), I can afford to attend a game or two.

 

Yours in hope for 2011,

Louis Villaume

From an off-peak home.

 

 

 

 

Villaume: The Year of the TE

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: July 30, 2011 - 5:27 PM

There has been a change in red zone offenses over the last few years. Sure, it is nice to have that power running back that can blast it in from inside the five yard line. Another weapon is the tall receivers with good hands that snatch TDs away from shorter cornerbacks.

Recently there has been a swing toward finding the leaping basketball-playing TE. Guys like the Jaguars' Marcedes Lewis and Oakland's Rob Gronkowski each had ten touchdowns. Better known TEs like the Chargers' Antonio Gates (10) and the Cowboys' Jason Witten (9) also found the red zone often in 2010. Vernon Davis of the 49ers had seven TDs, and his stock is rising. So too is the play of Brandon Pettigrew of the Lions, and many others.

The Vikings have benefited from the efforts of Visanthe Shiancoe. The last three seasons Shiancoe has 145 receptions for 1,692 yards and 20 TDs. And those numbers are tainted by missed time due to injury. Shiancoe had only two TDs last year, a significant drop from the previous two.

So when the Vikings chose 6'6, 259 lb. Kyle Rudolph, a junior from Notre Dame, with the 43rd overall pick fans were curious. Some thought it a wise move right away, after all, Shiancoe is a nine year veteran and 31 years-old. There was still Jeff Dugan and Jim Kleinsasser on the roster, but that was easily rationalized as the difference between receiving and blocking tight ends. Others were upset. Why hadn't we addressed positions of greater need? S Rahim Moore, OL Stefen Wisniewski, and DE Da'Quan Bowers were all available. What were the purple brass thinking?

They were thinking Kyle Rudolph was special. He was a serious talent in two sports in high school: basketball and football. For example, in his senior season Rudolph scored 25 of his team's 52 points in a close loss to the top team in the state. He finished 2nd all-time in scoring at Elder High. He was offered basketball scholarships to attend ACC universities. But he decided to attend Notre Dame and focus on football.

At Notre Dame Rudolph became the first true freshman to ever start for the Irish at TE. He would finish with the fourth most receptions all-time at TE, despite a shortened junior year due to a hamstring injury, and an early exit to the NFL draft. In 2010 he had back-to-back games with eight receptions vs. Michigan and Michigan State.

So now it appears Rudolph has signed with the team. Suddenly, the Vikings look not-so-good at receiver, but really good at tight end. With both Shiancoe and Rudolph in the lineup, the Vikings find themselves with red zone options similar to the aforementioned TEs of 2010. Could it be that the Vikings are leaning toward having both in the lineup? Maybe Donovan McNabb and/or Christian Ponder will utilize the athleticism of the new TE?

It makes sense. Minnesota may be bringing a new look to the 2011 offense. One with an emphasis on TEs.

Winning or Draft Position?

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: January 1, 2011 - 11:33 AM

As a fan of all Minnesota sports I watched for years as the Timberwolves lost and lost only to miss out on franchise players in the draft. The NBA local team would win just enough to miss out on lottery success. While others relished in Shaquille O'Neal, Kobe Bryant, Dwayne Wade, and the like, we found Paul Grant, Ricky Rubio, and Pooh Richardson. We were bad enough to deserve the number one pick, just never lucky in the lottery. Or the draft (except for Kevin Garnett).

Vikings' fans are not used to early draft picks. Since 1967 the Vikings have had five poor seasons (1984, 1990, 2001, 2002, 2006). The worst of those years was 3-13 with Les Steckel in 1984 that forced Bud Grant out of retirement. In 2001 the Vikings went 5-11. Those are the only two years potentially worse than this one in over forty years. In 1985 we used the lack of success to draft Chris Doleman. In 2002 we drafted Bryant McKinnie with the 7th selection.

More recently, after the 6-10 2006 season, we drafted Adrian Peterson from the 7th spot. Kevin Williams was taken with the 9th selection (you remember the non-pick?) in 2003 after a 6-10 season. Evidently, 6-10 is a good thing to be if you want quality players. Minnesota, now 6-9, stands on the cusp of a losing season. Presently there are six teams at 5-10, at it is quite probable that only one will improve to 6-10 (Arizona plays San Fran). That means the Vikings could finish anywhere from sixth to seventeenth in the draft dependent upon this week's games.

I am sure players and coaches could care less about draft position. I feel confident that they want to beat the Lions to finish the season. Detroit has been playing better of late, and the rookie defensive tackle Suh is already a Pro Bowler. This game is more about 'king of the hill' than it is about the draft. Frazier's contract talks have been sparked since the Eagles' win and a 4-2 finish would solidify his standing with management.

But we fans can look to the future. We must. Considering we face losing seasons about once every ten years, what else are we to do?

The Vikings face numerous free agents with the upcoming bargaining agreement changes, including potentially losing Chad Greenway, Ray Edwards, Ben Leber, Sidney Rice, and many more. On the flip side, the possibility of fourth and fifth year players becoming unrestricted free agents means the market is going to be large as well. The names read like a Who's Who in football. Suddenly, players like DeAngelo Williams, Haloti Ngata, Santonio Holmes, Jonathan Joseph, Eric Wright ... become unrestricted free agents.

So we face the Lions with much on the line in terms of the draft. A loss would benefit Minnesota greatly in the 2011 Draft. A win would simply keep the Lions in their place below us.

... Let's win.

Mother Nature plays Wag the Fan.

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: December 20, 2010 - 7:50 AM

The long Vikings' lease toward the Metrodome expires. The football franchise that has been Minnesota's for fifty years is on the brink of an exit if they do not have a new stadium. Now, Mother Nature has been a cruel temptress, dumping the fifth most snow on the white bubble in its' history.

But this time it collapsed.

No, it has collapsed before. Actually, I went to a Twins' baseball game the night it partially collapsed in the 1980s. All I remember is that we left in the 6th inning of a bad game and watched on television from a nearby establishment as the rains fell through the inflatable roof. I was sorry I left and missed the chance to see something you do not see every day.

Yet I would get another chance.

The video captured by FOX cameras and played for the last week straight was impressive. YouTube videos have sprung up showing a worker avoiding the wall of snow as it fell to the field. We are in the news here in the Twin Cities for something that collapsed. Again. This time, luckily, no one was hurt.

So the game is moved to the campus of the University of Minnesota. The big Vikings' fifty year celebration will be held in the chilling weather of December. Just like the days of the Met Stadium in Bloomington. Fair weathered fans who have softened over the years in the warmth of Hubert Humphrey Stadium, Mall of America Field, or whatever Mike Ditka wants to call it, will now face the big chill that was so much of the success of the 1970s Vikings.

Those lucky fans!

Meanwhile, legislatures will try and offer some type of packaged deal similar to the Twins Target Field, which will ensure that we keep the Purple in Minnesota. Fans of the Vikings want to see them stay, even if it means some type of financial burden placed on them and/or the community. They are hopeful a wealthy owner such as Ziggy Wilf would meet them at some place that demonstrated he cared about us, too.

But some Minnesotans are not fans.

They will not want to see another chunk of our state dollar be siphoned by the sports community. They will not listen to talk that the business of a football team is profitable for the state. They see rich people ensnaring we fans financially and emotionally to the point that it takes hundreds of dollars to now attend a single game with family. Televisions are tuned to the NFL on Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays.

And they may be right.

But suddenly we have to choose. The Dome has fallen at a most convenient time. Almost too convenient if you are a conspiracy theorist. Suddenly, the Vikings and their fans are the laughing stock of the NFL. Their outdated stadium has basically blown up. Right before a large national audience comes to call. And right before a state celebration of the team's 50th Anniversary. Surely, the good people of Minnesota will ask their representatives to vote "Yes" for a new stadium bill, won't they?

Never mind the strike talk.

I confess I want a new stadium. I hated the Dome. I loved being at the World Series in 1987 and 1991, but I resented being a season ticket holder for the Vikings at times. The piped in music, uncomfortable seats, and plastic feel were such a different feel that the Met. I went to many games in the 1970s. It was cold. It was wonderful. When teams visited from the West Coast or the South I would laugh as I watched them huddle around sideline heaters. That was our natural edge. We played in the environment that we grew up in.

What will happen next?

The fans are now in a position where events have pushed them to support immediately the building of a new stadium. Unfortunately, the possibility of a players' strike could not have come at a worse time. Add to that the worst economy in many, many years and we have a public relations disaster of great proportion. We have no money, yet we need to buy a stadium for a league that may not play because the millionaires and billionaires cannot decide on a fair percent of the profit.

Ouch.

As a fan who feels the Vikings are worth that, all I can say is ... Did you see that Dome collapse?

 

 

Peek-A-Boo

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: December 6, 2010 - 10:41 PM

The look on a small child's face when their mommy's face appears from behind something hidden is precious. I would learn in school studying the work of Jean Piaget and others that this process was called "object permanence" or the lack thereof. When the object leaves the sight of the underdeveloped brain, presto, it is gone. That is what makes Peek-A-Boo such a fun game. It is like finding your parent new each time.

Sure we all knew the talent existed. We have developed brains, we do not need to see something to know it is there. You can hide behind losses to the Dolphins and Packers are home, it does not matter. Most of us still remember that game in New Orleans last season, or the team that completely dismantled the Cowboys and even the Giants, albeit their reserves at the end of last year.

The ground game provided 190 yards, Adrian Peterson over one hundred with three TDs. Toby Gerhard added over fifty more. Tarvaris Jackson ran twice for twenty-two additional yards. All of that with guard Steve Hutchinson replaced in the starting lineup by rookie Chris DeGeare. Sidney Rice caught five for over one hundred yards including a Jackson pass that went through a pair of defender's hands and ended up being wrestled over for Rice's first score. The defense, led by the disappearing front line, was stalwart. Star rookie Steve Johnson of the Bills caught TWO passes.

No, this is not time to start looking at the playoff schedule. Unfortunately, most of the teams Minnesota is trying to catch also won. Only Tampa Bay faltered and that was because they faced a good Atlanta Falcons team now 10-2 and on top of the NFC. There are a few 8-4 teams that the Vikings would have to catch in order to make the playoffs, and presently our 5-7 record is woefully short. One of them, the New York Giants, comes to town next week.

No, we are not suddenly giddy like a two year old child. We have developed brains. We all knew the good team was right behind the wall, set of hands, or whatever blocked our view. We know this week it was only the Buffalo Bills, too.

The smile you see is because we missed them so very badly.

The good team, that is.

 

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