Louis Villaume

Louis Villaume, a lifelong Minnesotan, has been a Vikings fan since the late 1960s. He's also the seventh grade football coach in Rockford and works with the school's varsity team.

Posts about NFL post-season

100th Battle of Purple vs. Cheese

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: November 20, 2010 - 2:48 PM

It is a rivalry that dates back to October 22, 1961. At Metropolitan Stadium the fledgling Vikings took on the powerful Packers led by quarterback Bart Starr. Green Bay would score on a 78-yard TD pass on their first play from scrimmage and win 33-7. 

The Cheese would go on to win nine of the first ten matches, including sweeps in 1961-63, and 1965. Minnesota did not win a home game versus the Pack until 1968, the same year of the first Minnesotan sweep. The 1960s saw two Super Bowl wins for Green Bay and one loss for Minnesota. Though the decade belonged to the Pack, the late 60s saw a changing of the guard.

The 1970s were dominated by Minnesota. Six times Minnesota swept the head-to-head competition, including 1975-1978. But this domination resulted in only three Super Bowl losses, or if you are an eternal optimist, three NFC Conference titles. Despite being the far superior team, Minnesota was unable to win the NFL's ultimate prize.

In the 1980s saw a return of Green Bay, as they swept Minnesota five times (1980, 84, 85, 87, 88) compared to Minnesota's one (1986). But neither team ever made it to the Super Bowl, leaving that honor to the Chicago Bears. The 1980s were highlighted by two strike seasons, that of 1982 and 1987. In 1982 there was a 57-day outage, forcing the NFL to go to a nine game schedule and an expanded playoffs.This was the only season that the Pack and Vikes did not play two regular season games against each other. In 1987, the owners were ready, and a strike season turned into a replacement one, and then when settled, an asterisk for records. I recall the 87 season as a frustrating one in that our replacement players were very bad. They went 0-3, while the Pack's replacement went 2-1. Minnesota, however, went to the playoffs that year as the true team went 8-4 while the true Packers went 3-8-1.

The 1990s saw Minnesota sweep three times (1992, 93, 98) while Green Bay swept once (1997). But with the addition of Brett Favre to the Pack, it was Green Bay whom won two consecutive conference titles and Super Bowl XXXI. Minnesota had teams capable of getting there, but even a 15-1 season would not be enough as Minnesota choked away a shot at Super Bowl XXXIII.

The 2000s saw four sweeps for Green Bay (2000, 04, 06, 07) and two for Minnesota (2005, 09). Brett Favre was the QB in five of the sweeps as he transitioned from Green to Purple. In the 2004 season the two teams met for the first time in the playoffs, in January 2005, where the Vikings, losers of seven of their last ten regualr season games that year, entered Lambeau Field and whipped the Packers 31-17 behind Daunte Culpepper and Randy Moss' behind. That was probably the most humiliating defeat the Pack had suffered at the hands of the Vikings.

The 2010s decade has started with another close game between the two. Green Bay won and looks to add their 15th all-time sweep of Minnesota this Sunday (compared to 13 sweeps for Minnesota). Green Bay has survived many injuries to post their 6-3 record. I stated before the season that Green Bay would struggle some this year because Ryan Grant was just not that good. What I (and others) did not realize is that while true, it just did not matter. Aaron Rodgers and a decent defensive scheme has been enough. Brandon Jackson and John Kuhn have been more than enough at RB despite limited skills. Grant's injury proved that it was never he that drove this team. Green Bay's ability to overcome injuries all over the field in the 2010 season has been admirable (and that was hard to say).

The hometown team stares at a season suddenly on the line, a lifetime 48-50-1 record vs. Green Bay, and the multitude of obnoxious Green Bay fans scattered all through the Twin Cities and surrounding area lurking like a vultures near a road kill. I have been telling myself all season that we are more talented, and that talent survives. The loss to the Chicago Bears (along with the home Miami loss) has dampened the spirit. We look to Sunday's game against our most hated rival as the ante dote for a troubled year. Win, and most of us can walk away from a bad season with a smile. Lose, and the fans will disappear in droves. Or continue the witch hunt for a new coach.

Which will it be in the 100th meeting? My heart says the more talented Vikings will prevail by a decent margin. My head says it will be a battle that is decided by the team that wants it more, which appears to be Green Bay in 2010.

Let's go with the heart:  Minnesota 31  Green Bay 21.

 

Head Coach Hindsight

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: November 14, 2010 - 6:50 PM

Norm Van Brocklin (1961-66) did it for six years and never went to the playoffs. He was 29-51-4. But he did get stuck with building a new franchise surrounded by powerhouses Chicago and Green Bay.

Bud Grant (1967-1983, 1985) was head coach for eighteen seasons. He has the longest consecutive year tenure (1967-83) as well as most years. His 7-9 season after the 1984 Les Steckel (3-13) debacle would be his last. Grant was 151-87-5 with a 10-12 record in the playoffs, losing four Super Bowls including three in a four year span.

Longtime assistant Jerry Burns (1986-1991) was next after Grant re-retired. He was 52-43 with a 3-3 record in the playoffs. He is probably best known for local radio spoofs featuring his rough language.

Dennis Green (1992-2001), or the "Sheriff", had the second longest tenure, going 97-62 with a 4-8 playoff record. He has the 2nd highest winning percentage behind Grant in the regular season, but is tied for the worst percentage in the playoffs with (you guessed it) Brad Childress.

Mike Tice (2001-05) had a rough go of it, compiling a 32-33 record to be one of the three head coaches in Vikings' history not to have a winning record. Probably most known for his ticket selling scandal, Tice's 1-1 record in the playoffs is actually as good as any in team history, percentage-wise.

Brad Childress (2006 to present) is 36-29 to date. His playoff record is 1-2. The failure to defeat New Orleans in the NFC Championship last year, as well as the horrid start to 2010, has fans regretting the team's decision to hire and/or keep Childress. Rumors are plentiful that suggest there is little respect from players to coach. The Randy Moss fiasco has put the spotlight on a head coach that does not have the support of the community. But then again, neither did Green, Burns, Tice, or Steckel. Minnesota's fans expects lost Super Bowls at a minimum.

As the anti-Childress support grows, like dandelions in season, many look to a new coach. There is speculation that Leslie Frazier could be placed in the head coach role should Childress get axed. One thing is certain, Minnesota has missed capitalizing on coaches within their grasp. Securing Frazier might become a priority as Minnesota has watched too many good coaches get away.

Here are a few...

Brian Billick. Billick served as the Vikings' offensive coordinator from 1992 to 1998 under the Green regime. Minnesota stuck with Green as Billick took the head coaching position in Baltimore in 1999. There he led the Ravens to an 80-64 record, and further 5-3 in the playoffs with a Super Bowl (XXXV) win in his 2nd year. Billick must have had a special eye for talent as six of his staff went on to head coaching positions, most of which are still active (Jack Del Rio, Marv Lewis, Mike Nolan, Rex Ryan, Mike Singletary, and Mike Smith). Billick is an analyst now, though some wonder if he would come back if properly prompted.

Tony Dungy. Dungy was defensive coordinator from 1992 to 1995. He became the head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1996. His six year service included four playoff visits for a franchise used to losing. He next left Indianapolis, only to see John Gruden win the Super Bowl in his absence with the Bucs. But Dungy won Super Bowl XLI with the Colts. He retired in 2009, having a career record of 139-69 and a 9-10 playoff record. He is another name being tossed about for both the Gophers and the Vikings. But house money suggests he will stay on television.

Mike Tomilin. Tomlin was promoted to defensive coordinator when he joined Minnesota in 2006 by new coach Brad Childress. His success parlayed into an offer from the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2007, and a NFL record as youngest coach to win a Super Bowl (XLIII). He presently has a 37-19 career record, 3-1 in the playoffs. Without a doubt he is the most talked about "one that got away" coach. His job presently is very secure.

There are others. But lest we forget, sometimes assistants and coordinators do not pan out as head coaches. Some have success, but often with a steep price. Examples...

Buddy Ryan. Minnesota went to three Super Bowls with the Purple People Eaters from 1973 to 1978. Ryan was a gifted defensive coordinator who was mentioned but passed over frequently for head coaching positions. Minnesota loved Grant, so Ryan had no chance to climb the ladder in Minnesota. For that and other reasons he left for Chicago in 1978. His success with the Bears led to a Super Bowl win (XX) in which he was carried off the field with Mike Ditka. The two's feuds, however, were legendary. Minnesota then passed on re-acquiring Ryan in years 1984 through 1986. Finally in 1986 the Philadelphia Eagles gave Ryan his chance. Buddy would compile a 43-38-1 record with an 0-3 playoff record. Ryan was loved for his abrasive personality and boasts of success. But he did not live up to the hype. Ryan later took his act to Houston as defensive coordinator. In that short stint he punched offensive coordinator Kevin Gilbride in the jaw for his inability to use up the clock from a run and shoot offense. So off he went. 1994 the Arizona Cardinals offered a head coaching position to Ryan. In his two year stint he was 12-20. The Ryan Express finally ended.

Scott Linehan. Scott was offensive coordinator from 2002 to 2004. His name was tossed about during the time of Childress' hiring. But Linehan was passed over. He eventually was given the head coaching position in St. Louis in 2006. His two year tenure resulted in an 11-25 record. He now is the offensive coordinator for the Detroit Lions. A sentence worse than death itself.

Ted Cottrell. Cottrell was defensive coordinator from 2004 to 2005. He had an extensive career resume' of both NCAA and NFL positions. The Vikings passed on Ted. Later, Ted was given his chance to coach the New York Sentinels in the United Football League. He finished 0-6 as was never considered again for a head coaching position.

Marc Trestman. Trestman was an assistant in the 1980s and early 1990s. He was mentioned as a possibility when the team was looking for a head coach. Trestman was an offensive coordinator for numerous teams in the 1990 and 2000s. Not too long ago he became the head coach of the Montreal franchise of the Canadian Football League (a la Grant). In his three year tenure he has compiled a 38-16 record winning one Grey Cup, losing another, and a third year pending. Maybe now Trestman has entered into the thoughts of the Wilfs as his recent career suddenly parallels Grant.

Hindsight is 20-20 as they say. In a hind-sighted world Minnesota would have landed maybe Buddy Ryan, Tony Dungy and/or Brian Billick instead of Les Steckel, Jerry Burns, Dennis Green or Mike Tice. Instead of Childress running the show, we would have promoted Mike Tomlin ourselves.

There is considerable feeling that Minnesota will make a move at the end of this season, barring a miraculous return deep into the playoffs. Leslie Frazier is the assistant that could soon end up on this list of coulda-beens. The question is whether he will fit into the Dungy/Billick/Tomlin grouping or the Cottrell/Linehan one?

One thing is certain. We will be there in hindsight.

 

 

 

 

 

Come Together, Right Now

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: October 17, 2010 - 10:04 AM

It was a good day for Minnesota. With about six minutes remaining the Vikings scored their final touchdown, Brett Favre's fourth passing TD, to cap a drive that left some Cowboys bitter. Keith Brookings ran up to the Minnesota bench and yelled "classless" to Brad Childress for either leaving starters in up 27-3, for passing frequently to score, or because Brookings was so frustrated by being dominated he regressed to adolescence.

If you examined the statistics, the game was not so one-sided as the score. First Downs were even at sixteen. Time of possession and total plays favored Dallas slightly. Third down conversions were almost identical, with Minnesota converting one more than the Cowboys. But it was what each team did when they had the ball. It was about field position and turnovers. And in those areas it was a definitive edge for the Vikings.

In that game Cedric Griffin had nine solo tackles. Ray Edwards had three sacks (of the team's six) and six hits (of the team's ten) on the quarterback. Sidney Rice caught 6 passes for 141 yards and 3 TDs. It was the most one-sided win in playoff memory in which it was Minnesota being the dominant. Now fast-forward.

The Cowboys arrive with the same 1-3 record that haunts the Vikings. Media has proclaimed this game a 'must-win' for whichever team wants to be in the playoffs. There is not room for both, they say. Gone are a couple of the heroes that led us to our playoff victory of last year. Griffin is out for the year with a recent season-ending knee injury. Rice has been out all season with his delayed surgery of his hip. Edwards is here, but not nearly playing to the level he displayed in that 2009 Divisional Game. Dallas arrives healthier than when they appeared last year. But playing a lot worse.

Meanwhile, Brett Favre is questionable as to whether he will further his continual streak of games started (that means he will). The defense has only six sacks in the first four games, which happens to be the same number as they had in the one playoff game. We saw the first glimpse of a clicking offense with new arrival Randy Moss versus the New York Jets. But we also saw another close loss.

Will this be the game that Minnesota comes together? Will the defense continue to play well despite missing their best cover in Griffin? Will the front four batter Tony Romo like they did last year?

One thing is certain, Adrian Peterson will improve on his last performance versus the Cowboys. In that game he was held to 63 yards on 26 carries. There is no doubt you will see better numbers. Favre right now is not playing to the same level as he did last year against the Cowboys when he finished with a passer rating of 134.4. More like half of that. He is looking the worse for wear this year, throwing far more interceptions, and struggling to get the protection necessary to be as successful as 2009.

But now is the time. It is the site of something very good last year. The Cowboys arrive in full memory of what occurred in 2009 and they will want revenge. Minnesota, seemingly out of sync, looks to today to bring back the stellar play of their team at the place where it all crescendoed in last year's near Super Bowl season. What will be today's outcome?

I expect today the offense and the defense will come together and it will be a Purple Day.

 

 

Randy Moss is Coming to Town?

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: October 5, 2010 - 10:09 PM

OK, I cannot even think straight. Can it be?

I feel like a teenage girl who just found out a girl overheard someone say that a boy likes me. And he is cute. .. OK, maybe a little feminine. How about the first time someone got a "Christmas Bonus"? Or when someone offers to snow plow the driveway because they are bored. Very happy, indeed.

Whatever the case, this is a rumor we embrace. Randy Moss and his electrifying history of pass receiving returns to the Vikings in Brett Favre's final season. Given the excellent running game to date by Adrian Peterson, and the impressive start of the season by the defense, this is a rumor that quenches thirst like no Ade can. Or ale.

Even if we let go of a first round pick, as long as we sign Randy Moss to a couple of years this is a win-win scenario. Even if he only stayed the year, it would be worth that much just to watch Packers and Bears fans sweat. They will say things like "Favre doesn't have it anyway" or "Moss cannot do it himself". but they would be lying ... to themselves and us. They will not be happy. They will know that Moss is exactly what is missing from last year's team. If Sidney Rice does return, Minnesota could possibly have the best run AND pass offense in the league come playoff time.

I know I am getting carried away, but ... hey, it is Randy Moss!

Oh please, oh please, be one of those true rumors...

Like a solid foreshadowing of a 50th year celebration in February.

 

 

 

Is it 2001 all over again?

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: October 2, 2010 - 8:55 PM

We remember. It was a season coming off of one of the harshest losses the Minnesota Vikings had ever suffered in an NFC Championship. Beaten on the road after a decisive win at home in the previous round. Fans who disliked the coach for his lack of playoff success grew. But their was hope by many as the team had a new quarterback who had played very well in getting the team to the NFC Championship.

And then, tragedy struck.

A player would not be available to start the season. It would be a blow to the offense, who had counted on this player for its' success. They would start poorly without him, losing their first two games. Then they would win one they should at home to be 1-2 in the standings. A tough schedule lay ahead.

The 2010 Minnesota Vikings you say?

Or maybe the 2001-02 Vikings. Back then it was Daunte Culpepper, fresh off his successful first year with the team. The much maligned Denny Green had disappointed in the playoffs again. The New York Giants disposed of Minnesota 41-0 at the end. During the following training camp, Korey Stringer died tragically, and the team was scrambling to replace such an important member of the offense.

They started the season by losing 24-13 to Carolina. The Panthers would win only one game the entire year. Next, Minnesota lost 17-10 to Chicago. After a 31-26 win over Tampa Bay, they stood at 1-2. The city was nervous. Things were not clicking like they had in the previous year. And they were right to be nervous. Minnesota would make it to 3-3, and then proceed to lose nine of the last eleven games, to finish at 5-11.

Dennis Green was let go before the end of the year. He had not done enough with the talent he was given. That final year, Minnesota had an exceptionally poor Draft, with Michael Bennnett being the top selection with the 27th pick. Mike Tice replaced Green in the final game, and would go on to a mediocre few years before being let go. Both Green Bay and Chicago had success in those years while Minnesota floundered.

Flash forward.

The loss of Sidney Rice just before the season has had an obvious impact on Minnesota. The Vikings are 29th in total offense. Brett Favre, who tore the league up in 2009, has a 60.4 passer rating (that's really low). He has only 597 yards and two touchdowns in his first three games. Despite the number two rusher in the NFL, the offense is just not getting it done.

Brad Childress is a coach walking the plank, so to speak. He has had improved success in regular season each year, but little in the playoffs. Minnesota fans are not happy with just getting there. Childress has been given plenty of talent to obtain that elusive first Super Bowl. Positive drafts have yielded players like Adrian Peterson, Rice, Percy Harvin and much more. Acquisitions, like Favre and Steve Hutchinson, have given the team elite offensive talent. Their are many veterans on the defense who are candidates for All-Pro consideration this year. It is now or never for the coach.

Some are hoping that Childress' trend of improvement every year will also apply to the playoffs. Most fans would concede that the Vikings certainly had the team necessary to win one. The humbling of the Cowboys and the strong effort in New Orleans demonstrated just that. But this year's slow start, or more specifically, the loss to the Dolphins at home, has fans on edge. The Childress haters are convinced we have no chance. The realists see a very tough schedule in the upcoming weeks and more talent on both the Bears and Packers than a true Viking fan could stand. And the optimist correctly assessing available talent, is sure that this is still the strongest team in the NFC North. They remember that this team was a play (or huddle) away from winning the NFC Championship. And they have faith that Brett Favre will begin to return to last year's form.

We did experience 2001. It was not fun. This season's start has been somewhat depressing, given the talent and expectation coming into the opener in New Orleans. If it is to be deja vous all over again, it will probably come at the expense of a head coach. Many would like that. Sacrifice a season to get a new head coach. But what if the next one is Mike Tice? I think we should just start winning again with the same coach.

We will find out soon after the bye week is over. 

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