Louis Villaume

Louis Villaume, a lifelong Minnesotan, has been a Vikings fan since the late 1960s. He's also the seventh grade football coach in Rockford and works with the school's varsity team.

Posts about AFC

Villaume: Where does AP rank among the greats?

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: January 2, 2013 - 4:00 PM

 Adrian Peterson already holds many Vikings' records. He is first in rushing attempts (1754), yards rushing (8,849), rushing TDs (76), 1,000 yard seasons (5), yards per game rushing (99.4), to mention just a few. The awesomeness of these records is: one, that he has accomplished it all in six years; and two, the decisiveness with which he is shattering previous records. Presently, Bill Brown and Chuck Foreman are second in TDs, only 24 behind. Robert Smith is second in rushing yards, though he trails by 2,031 yards despite playing two more seasons. The next closest yards per game rusher? Smith again, at 69.6 yards, about 30 yards short of AP.

After we witnessed Peterson's Herculean efforts last Sunday in the dramatic 37-34 win over the Packers, most Minnesotans are certain that number twenty-eight is this year's NFL MVP. Sure, Peyton Manning has done amazing things in Denver this year. He has kept pace or surpassed Tom Brady and/or Aaron Rodgers. He is alongside Drew Brees. And his team is winning. The Broncos have secured the one-seed in the AFC. 

But how long ago was it Tim Tebow winning there? And if Tebow was able to lead Denver to victories last year, how less valuable does that make Manning? Add to that fact that the voters have already given Manning three MVPs, and most could see why they might decide to give the award to AP in 2012.

Adrian fell nine yards short of the all-time yards rushing title last Sunday. As he stated later in the week, it was bittersweet. The perfect story book ending would have had him score in the waning seconds on that final run, not be stopped near the ten yard line. Blair Walsh's field goal that just snuck inside the left goalpost gave Minnesota an improbable ticket to the playoffs while ending one of the greatest seasons ever assembled by any football player.

Just how great?

Peterson finished with 2,097 yards. But his yards per carry was 6.0 in 2012. His yards per game 131.1. Dickerson averaged 5.6 yards per carry in his record setting year in 1984. And he finished 0.5 yards per game higher. Only Jim Brown in 1963 (6.3, 133.1) and O.J. Simpson (6.0, 143.1) in 1973 were better. Ever.

Chris Johnson in 2009 had 2,006 yards, averaging 5.7 a carry, and 125.4 yards per game. He was close.

Another way to measure RB greatness is to total how many times they led the league in rushing. Jim Brown won eight rushing titles in nine seasons, or 89%. Barry Sanders, with four titles in ten years, is at 40%. Earl Campbell won three titles in eight years, or 37.5%. Next is Eric Dickerson at 36.4%. Adrian Peterson is presently at 33.3%, having won his 2nd in his six seasons. Emmitt Smith won four titles, but played 15 seasons, and is at 26.7% despite being the all-time leading rusher.

This would mean that Walter Payton was not very good, as he won only one title in 13 years. Payton was runner-up to Campbell three times. Or Jim Taylor of the Packers would be lesser ranked because he happened to play in the same era as Jim Brown.

No, maybe the truest measure of a running backs' greatness is yards per carry?

Which would mean one of the greatest seasons ever belonged to Beattie Feathers of the Chicago Bears. You remember him, right? He was the first 1,000 yard rusher back in 1934. In that magical season he ran for 1,004 yards with an average yards per carry of 8.4. However, his yards per game a mere 91.3.

And that LB-RB Marion Motley of the Cleveland Browns (1946-53) may have been better than his predecessor, Brown. Motley averaged 5.7 yards a carry for his career, easily ranking him first all-time among qualified backs. However, Motley averaged only 47.6 yards per game with the Browns.

So, if we decide to add yards per carry to yards per game, and sprinkle in lifetime achievements like rushing titles and career yards, we may find how to truly measure a running back's greatness. And that is just what I did.

Here are my top ten RBs of All-Time...

10. Chris Johnson, Tennessee Titans (2008-present). I know what you are thinking. He doesn't belong in the top 50 until he earns it. But hear the numbers out. Johnson has 6,888 yards in five years. He has recorded five straight 1,000 yard seasons. In 2009, he ran for 2,006 yards. He has a lifetime 4.7 a carry, which ranks him fifth on this list. His 87.2 yards per game ranks sixth. He is already 57th all-time is rushing yards. He belongs.

9. Bo Jackson, Oakland Raiders (1987-90). Despite playing only four seasons, and starting only 23 games, Bo makes the list. Bo averaged 5.4 yards every time he ran the ball, better than any other on this list. He had season long runs over 90 twice, and 88 in another year. Bo ran a 4.1 at the NFL combine. He was wicked fast, and maybe the most dangerous player of all-time. His career was cut short by injury. He would go on to be a major league baseball player. And a good one. 

8. Earl Campbell, 2 teams (1978-85). Playing most of his career with the Houston Oilers, Campbell won the rushing title in each of his first three seasons. In the six full seasons Campbell was an Oiler, the team was 43-46-0 overall. He was so impressive to watch, a giant guy running over, through, and by anyone. He finished with 4.3 yards per carry, and 81.8 yards per game. Those numbers are skewed as he was little used in three of his final four seasons. His brutal approach to carrying a football was the cause for an early demise. Still, he ranks 31st overall in career rushing yards.

7. O.J. Simpson, 2 teams (1969-79). Simpson was with the Buffalo Bills for most of his career. The Bills were 43-81-2 during that time. During an era where most teams learned to use the pass as a weapon, Buffalo relied on running the ball. Simpson had four rushing titles in a five-year span (1972-76). He was the first to cross the 2,000 barrier in 1973 with 2,003 yards. The next closest rusher that year was John Brockington, only 859 yards away. O.J. averaged 4.7 yards per carry, and 83.2 yards per game over his career. Simpson ranks 18th overall in yards rushed.

6. Emmitt Smith, 2 teams (1990-2004). Smith is the all-time rushing leader at 18,355 yards. So why is he so low on this list? Smith averaged 4.2 yards per carry, and 81.2 yards per game. His was longevity as much as greatness. He did win four rushing titles in a five year span (1991-95). He had 11 straight 1,000 yard seasons. The Cowboys were 116-92-0 during his time there. He was great, but there were better...

5. Walter Payton, Chicago Bears (1975-1987). Payton played all 13 seasons with the Bears. Like Smith, he led them to the Super Bowl win. Payton averaged 4.4 yards per carry, and 88.0 yards per game. He finished with 16,726 yards, at that time the most ever. He would have won more than one title, but he happened to play during an era that included O.J. Simpson, Earl Campbell, and Eric Dickerson. His nickname was "Sweetness" and those that watched him would agree... he was. He had ten 1,000 yard seasons, only interrupted by the strike-shortened season of 1982 (9 games). In Payton's only season leading the league (1977), he won his rushing title by 579 yards.

4. Eric Dickerson, 4 teams (1983-1993). Dickerson was unique in that he is not associated with one team. He spent parts of five seasons with both the Rams and the Colts. He finished with 13,259 yards rushing, four titles including the all-time rushing mark of 2,105 in 1984. He had seven straight 1,000 yard seasons to start his career. He had over 1,800 in three of his first four seasons. Dickerson finished his career averaging 4.4 yards a carry, and 90.8 yards per game. He was a work horse that averaged over 100 yards per game in five of his first six seasons. But those seasons took a toll. In his final four years, had 2,033 rushing yards total in 45 games for the Colts, Raiders, and Falcons.

3. Adrian Peterson, Minnesota Vikings (2007-present). You have seen him for six years. His lifetime achievements are still waiting to unfold. At present, Peterson is 33rd all-time in rushing. His 5.0 yards per carry bettered by only Brown on this list. His 99.4 yards per game 3rd best. AP won the 2012 rushing title by 484 yards over Alfred Morris. This coming off of knee surgery that had many fearing for his career. He has two rushing titles in six years. He was runner-up to LaDainian Tomlinson in his rookie year. Minnesota is 49-47-0 in those six years. Maybe some homer-bias, but his numbers hold out.

2. Barry Sanders, Detroit Lions (1989-98). Sanders was the most elusive player I have ever seen. He won four titles in his ten years (1990,94,95,97), three after his fifth season. He lost a title in 1991 by five yards. He got better with age. His final rushing title included an MVP award. He was honored as much for his demeanor as his feats. Sanders finished with a 5.0 average yards per carry, and 99.8 yards per game average, both 2nd on this list. He left the game when he was within reach of Payton's all-time record, still fully capable. Detroit's losing ways had returned and he did not want to be a part of another rebuild. Sanders takes a backseat to no one, except...

1. Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns (1957-65). Many fans never saw him play, including me. So how does he keep ending up atop a list such as this one? Try eight rushing titles in nine years. Or 5.2 yards per carry, or 104.3 yards per game. He was a three-time MVP. He won the 1958 title by 791 yards over Alan Ameche, setting a new NFL record by 95 yards over Spec Sanders of the defunct AAFC, with 1,527 yards. He broke his own record in 1963, by 336 yards, with an 1,863 yard effort that stood until Simpson broke in ten years later. That year he bear runner-up Jim Taylor by 845 yards, or nearly double. Further, in 1963 he averaged 6.4 yards per carry. His final season, his ninth, he won the title by 677 yards over rookie Gale Sayers. And that just scratches the surface of his greatness.

There were serious absences from this list that deserve mention. All-time rushing leaders like: Curtis Martin, Tomlinson, Jerome Bettis, Tony Dorsett, Marshall Faulk, Edgerrin James, Marcus Allen, and Franco Harris to name a few. Other older generation rushing title holders like Steve Van Buren, a four-time title winner from the Philadelphia Eagles post-WW II. Or Joe Perry of the 49ers, the first to rush for 1,000 yard seasons back-to-back in 1953-54.

We will learn who is MVP in a short while. He will watch All Day's career unfold. But these are personal achievements, and should not outweigh the team matter at hand. This Saturday AP will once again have to prove to skeptics why a guy like me would value him so greatly.

AP Knows what it is all about...

or was that Bo.

Skol.

 

 

 

 

 

Villaume: Purple fan's predictions on 2012

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: September 9, 2012 - 11:06 AM

It is almost here.

Actually it was here Wednesday, the opening game between the Giants and the Cowboys. Two of my personal 'most-hated' teams in the NFL. Dallas and New York have become staples of NFL television. I watch them both far too often. I really do not care for what happens in the oft-bloated NFL East.

Nor do I care for afternoons of the AFC West. Instead, give me the NFC North. But unless you have a package that provides other game opportunities, or you want to spend Sunday managing the internet and watching from a computer, you basically get what they give you. Maybe that is why I know Oakland and Denver's history better than Chicago or Detroit.

But I digress.

What can we expect in 2012 from our young, recovering Minnesota Vikings? Now minutes away from opening kickoff, most fans I have read, listened, or watched do not expect great things. They realize that Christian Ponder is young and inexperienced. They see Adrian Peterson trying to come back too quickly from a major injury. They scoff at the talent Minnesota displays at wide receiver after Percy Harvin. A defensive backfield too old (Winfield), too young (Smith), or inconsistent (everybody else). Linebackers that make the famous "no-name defense" of Miami seem celebratory.

Their predictions have ranged from no better than 3-13 to a modest 6-10.

And then there is the optimists, blind if unsuccessful, loyal to the end. They see elite talent in Jared Allen, A rejuvenated Kevin Williams, Percy Harvin, Adrian Peterson, and a strong rookie class. They see an 'easy' schedule in the first half of the season. They see Chicago getting old. They see the Packers defense crumbling. They see the Lions as paper tigers. They see what they want to see.

These predictions range from 8-8 to about 11-5 and and a playoff birth. (Even blind homers are realists somewhat, no 13-3 out there).

The funniest part of it all is that most fans on either side will not change their minds after this first game. They will see what they want to see. If the Vikings win, it will be because the Jaguars are bad. It will be because Maurice Jones-Drew held out, or the top tackler was injured. If Minnesota loses, it will be first game jitters for the young ones. Or bad officiating, or play-calling. I find it most humorous that about 1,000,000 Minnesotans feel they are better play callers than Bill Musgrave or Leslie Frazier. Every game. Every year. Except Bud Grant, hallowed be his name.

My prediction?

I will be watching no matter what... Right, honey?

 

The Filler Bowl

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: January 30, 2011 - 6:54 PM

I used to like the Pro Bowl. The images of Hawaii, the relaxed look at the players, the sideline interviews, and the chance to see the league's best perform against each other were enough reasons to warrant viewing of the end of the season highlight game. When the game was played in Honolulu at teh end of the NFL season, it was the perfect showcase for the NFL. It was an end of the year celebration. It was never really about who won the game, but rather, which players could dominate it. Four times Minnesota Vikings won that honor, the MVP of the Pro Bowl. Fran Tarkenton was the first in 1965, and Adrian Peterson the last only a few years ago.

Today's Pro Bowl, cast between conference championships and the Super Bowl, is more a showcase of how little the players think of the game. Sure, ten of the twenty-eight missing players will be excused because they are in Super Bowl XLV, but isn't that who we wanted to see? For whatever reason Aaron Rodgers was left off of the roster, but six other Packers will be absent. But fear not, there was six Cowboys selected. Add five Giants and five Eagles and the NFC roster takes on an East feel, despite their ineptness in 2010.

The missing list includes a who's who of the NFL. Offense? Try missing Rodgers, Andre Johnson, Greg Jennings, DeSean Jackson, Antonio Gates, Tom Brady, Maurice Jones-Drew and a few of the league's best linemen. On the defense, Dwight Freeney, Nnamdi Asomugha, Lance Briggs, Ed Reed, Asante Samuel, Ndamukong Suh, and Brian Urlacher, to name a few. I will even miss watching Clay Matthews, the dominant long-haired pass rusher of Green Bay. The long hair really bugs me, but can he play!

While I would not place the Pro Bowl in the same light as the All-Star games in the NBA and NHL (absolutely no defense), I think MLB has a better game. No, not the call-it-a-draw game, but the chance to see the game's best play hard. In baseball, one can play hard and not risk injury. Such is not the case in the other sports. The NFL simplifies defenses so as to avoid injuries. The result is a lot more scoring. While it is similar to the other sports, football's intensity seems to hide the softness of the All-Star venue better than hockey or basketball. I know when I am watching a 14-12 hockey game something is missing.

So today we sit back and watch the Pro Bowl if we has absolutely nothing else to do. I am debating taking the ice out of the gutters or viewing the game.

And it is a tough decision...

 

Green Bay or Chicago? The NFC North is Suddenly All That

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: January 22, 2011 - 5:10 PM

It was the worst of times. Or is.

A 6-10 year was difficult to swallow. Given the success of the 2009 Vikings many found the 2010 season upsetting. Brett Favre was battered like Archie Manning, due in part to a offensive line that seemed to scream "Where is Matt Birk?". Favre's response to the attack was to throw interceptions or fumble in his own end zone (against a visiting Dolphins). The two tackles did not have success against the better pass-rushers in the NFL such as Julius Peppers or Clay Matthews. The defensive secondary minus Cedric Griffin and the hope of a talented Chris Cook was awful. The defensive front seemed to take half of the season off in terms of a pass rush. But we persevere as the fan. Better times are ahead, right?

Now we face this weekend's championship game with the knowledge that our two most hated rivals, the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears, are this year's best in the NFC. It is not the New Orleans Saints, Atlanta Falcons, or any East team. The NFC North is a powerhouse. Don't laugh, we have sent three of the last four finalists to the NFC Championship. Five of the last ten teams. Unfortunately, it has been mostly Chicago and Green Bay.

We can rationalize our failure in 2010 as a product of our two rivals' success. After all, we were 6-6 against the rest of the NFL. Only the games versus the Giants was as lopsided a loss as matches with the Bears and Packers, and that was one with Tarvaris Jackson at the helm. We were closer against the Saints, Patriots, and Jets in other losses. But that defensive mechanism does not take away the reality that our division is tough right now.

I reluctantly tip my cap to the two teams. Green Bay has awoke with an offense that is quite impressive. Aaron Rodgers is the quarterback Minnesota wished it had. The Dom Capers' defense has improved as those cheesy blowhard fans had predicted. Now, they seem to have found a punishing running back in James Starks. No, he is not Adrian Peterson. But he also is not Ryan Grant, to the betterment of Green Bay.

The Chicago Bears have arisen thanks to their defense. There is enough hands now on the offense that Jay Cutler's missiles find targets. The line gets enough of a push to allow Matt Forte chances at yardage. But the defense shows up religiously. Twelve times this season they have surrendered twenty of fewer points, including eight of their first nine games (the exception being twenty-three). Only the loss to the Patriots suggested this season that the Bears might be vulnerable defensively.

 

We are left with cheering for the winner of this Sunday's game in the Super Bowl. As much as I despise the thought, I certainly would prefer that one of the two defeat the winner of the AFC Championship. An NFC  win would be further proof that the 2010 's demise was as much a result of our division's toughness as any ineptness. Not that it is comforting knowing the Bears and Packers are really good right now.

It certainly is not.

 

 

So This Is Thanksgiving

Posted by: Louis Villaume Updated: November 25, 2010 - 10:15 AM

It started as far back as any fan can remember. In 1902 the "National" Football League (no relation), an organization backed by Major League Baseball, would have a Thanksgiving weekend set of games. The Ohio League, some say the birthplace of present day NFL, played games involving the powerhouse Canton Bulldogs in 1905-06. The last year before the official start of the NFL the Buffalo Prospects and the Rochester Jeffersons played to a scoreless tie for the New York Pro Football League in 1919. In 1920 the NFL took shape and the Chicago Bears, Chicago Cardinals, Detroit Lions, and Green Bay Packers dominated the holiday games, save for a two year stretch (1939-40) when the Eagles and Steelers stole the show.

Televising the games first started in 1953. By 1956 CBS had taken control. Of course, the first game shown in color was on a Thanksgiving, 1965, when the Lions hosted the Colts. In 2006, the NFL added a third game through the NFL Network. The present schedule is for both conferences to alternate visiting Detroit and Dallas. The third game is randomly selected, though many feel the AFC should be allowed to permanently host at least one game. FOX and CBS, which have contracts with the NFL until 2013, broadcast the events based on the road team's conference.

Most teams will have opportunities to appear on Thanksgiving. Our own Minnesota Vikings have had six chances, and sport a league best 5-1 record. The Vikings' first appearance was in 1969, when they played at Detroit and won 27-0. They would also shut out the Lions in 1988 23-0. Minnesota has beaten Dallas three times (1987, 1998, 2000) in mostly  high scoring games. The Vikings only loss on Thanksgiving was a 38-44 game vs. Detroit in 1995.

The one constant over the years has been that Detroit hosts the first game and that Dallas hosts the second. There has been many memorable games on Thansgiving Day. Maybe the greatest was the 1974 Cowboys game in which Roger Staubach went down and Clint Longley came in off the bench trailing 16-3 and led Dallas to victory. Or twenty years later, Jason Garrett (yes, the present day interim head coach) replaced Troy Aikman and led the Cowboys to a 42-31 win over Brett Favre and the Packers. In 1976, O.J. Simpson ran for 273 yards vs. the Lions, but the Bills still lost by two touchdowns. They were really bad. In 1980, David Williams of Chicago returned an overtime kickoff for a touchdown, the only time in the league's history. 1989 was special for the infamous "Bounty Bowl", when Eagles and Cowboys played amid stories that coaches had offered money for taking players out of the game. And finally, the 1998 blown coin toss call by the referees on Jerome Bettis' mistaken head-tails call, which had led to the rule change that players must call the toss now before it is flipped.

But as a fan since the 1960s ended, I have a beef or two on Turkey Day. My original complaint was the third game. Not that I did not love having eleven hours of football on family day (I did, wife not so much), but when the NFL Network first started, they were not in every household. It hurt to know that as I ate my third slice of ice cream-pumpkin pie (a family recipe - to die for) there was a game going on in the NFL that I was not able to watch. That was more torturous than watching the Lions get killed 47-10 by the Titans in 2008. This situation has since been remedied as my monopolistic cable-provider has come to terms with the NFL.

My next complaint is the Detroit Lions. They are really bad. All the time. I believe I read that they have averaged more than a twenty point loss in six straight Thanksgiving days. For a while it was OK, because it seemed like the day was reserved for making fun of Matt Millen and the Fords. But then the Lions finally let Millen go. Now they are just bad and not so funny. Detroit has young talent, and will be good someday, but frankly, they are a complete bore on television. It is so bad that I find myself cheering for them despite the fact they are my division rivals. Today they will face the Patriots, who recently defeated the Steelers and the Colts. I wonder how that will go?

I am more complacent watching the Cowboys in the 2nd game. I hate them almost as much as Green Bay and more than Chicago. I hated the Hail Mary play, their domination in the Super Bowl years, the Herschel Walker trade, Jimmy Johnson and most of all, Jerry Jones. It is no strange coincidence that the two greatest egomaniacs of owners (Jones and Mark Cuban of the NBA) hail from Texas. This year they host New Orleans, and I hope Drew Brees throws for 600 yards. Sadly, the game really doesn't matter as the Cowboys, like the Lions, are completely out of the playoff race.

The final game tonight will be the Bengals and the Jets. This could have been a great game if Cincinnati had decided to play like they could play when they play. But they chose not. Instead, the contest will be another in which there is a blowout or the Jets win ugly. The best thing to look forward to in this game is the Terrell Owens and Darrelle Revis match up, made larger by Owens' big mouth. I will watch, but I may chose dishes over the second half, as Carson Palmer struggles more than he does not.

So this is Thanksgiving. Another year older. Another year of the Lions and Cowboys. Given the 3-7 record of Minnesota, I say Ziggy should get in those winter meetings and ask to be a permanent host of the future Thanksgivings, when Minnesota builds that new stadium. Or, if we choose not to, then the Wilfs can push for the West Coast to have the late game via the Los Angeles Vikings.

 

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