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Waste not: Repurpose bananas into terrific bread

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: April 27, 2014 - 11:34 AM
Photo by Richard Sennott

Photo by Richard Sennott

The VEAP building (Volunteers Enlisted in Assisting People) in Bloomington, which houses the largest food shelf in Minnesota (and offers many social services), has a new commercial kitchen, and with it a new effort to make good use of surplus fruits and vegetables. Their first project was to repurpose bananas into banana bread. They tinkered with a recipe to make it more healthful (whole wheat flour, less sugar, more bananas, less fat). See it below. Have to say it tastes mighty good.

For more about the program, go to the story.

BANANA BREAD

Makes 1 loaf.
Note: For the best flavor, use bananas that have lots of brown specks on the skin and that are slightly soft. Mash bananas with a table fork, potato masher or wire whisk; it’s fine to have small lumps remaining. A large, lengthwise crack in the thin, tender top crust of a quick bread is normal. From the kitchen of VEAP (Volunteers Enlisted in Assisting People) in Bloomington.

• 2 eggs
• 1/2 c. sugar (packed brown or granulated)
• 1/4 c. vegetable oil
• 1/4 c. fat-free or low-fat milk
• 2 tsp. vanilla
• 1 1/2 c. mashed very ripe bananas (5 to 6 medium) (see Note)
• 1 c. all-purpose flour
• 1 c. whole wheat flour
• 1 tsp. baking powder
• 1/2 tsp. baking soda
• 1/2 tsp. salt
• 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon


Directions

Move oven rack to low position so that top of pan will be in center of oven. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease bottom only of a 9- by 5-inch loaf pan with shortening or spray with cooking spray.


In large bowl, beat eggs, sugar, oil, milk and vanilla with wire whisk or spoon until smooth. Stir in mashed bananas until smooth. Stir in flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon with spoon or rubber scraper just until moistened. Pour into pan.


Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.


Cool 10 minutes. With a knife, loosen sides of loaf from pan and remove from pan. Place top side up on wire rack. Cool completely, about 1 hour, before slicing. Wrap tightly and store at room temperature up to 4 days or refrigerate up to 10 days.

Take a honey of a challenge

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: April 10, 2014 - 11:27 AM

 

Photo by the Star Tribune

Photo by the Star Tribune

 

It's a honey of a tasting tonight as local professional chefs present their best pastries featuring dandelion honey. Come for a sample -- many samples -- from Spoonriver, Lucia’s, Restaurant Alma, Andoyne, Gigi’s Café Uptown, Mason Restaurant Barre, Open Arms, Seward Co-Op Bakery, Treat, Mademoiselle Miel and Jenny Breen. Proceeds go to support Healthy Bees, Healthy Lives initiative.

When: Thursday, April 10
Time:6:30-9:30 p.m.
Where: Nicollet Island Pavillion, 40 Power Street, Minneapolis
Cost: $35

 

Music and movies at Taste Night at the Heights

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: March 21, 2014 - 12:06 PM

It was a sold-out crowd that settled into the seats at the Heights Theatre last night to watch the Audrey Hepburn classic "Breakfast at Tiffany's" and to hum along to the melody of "Moon River." The movie showing was sponsored by the Star Tribune's Taste section, the fourth in an occasional movie presentation that celebrates food in the movies (however briefly it appears!).

Prior to showtime, Harvey Gustafson was at the mighty Wurlitzer, pumping out old-time favorites, including such food classics as "Tea for Two."

One enthusiastic film buff included Veronica Min Wotipka, who came dressed in the manner of Audrey Hepburn's Holly Golightly: in short white fur stole and elaborate updo with a braid where Audrey's tiara would have been.

The three shows we've presented in the past include "Mildred Pierce," "Moonstruck" and "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner." Have any favorite food moments in the movies or suggestions for future movies? Send them our way to  taste@startribune.com/taste. We will show another movie in October.

Best cookbooks of year get nod from IACP

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: March 18, 2014 - 10:35 AM

Award season has begun in the cookbook world as the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) bestowed its nod to volumes that are particularly noteworthy over the weekend. Among the new designations in the contest this year are awards for classic, historical and e-cookbooks. 

The envelope (and categories), please …  


Book of the year: “Stone Edge Farm Cookbook,” by John McReynolds (Stone Edge Farm)


American: “The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen,” by Matt Lee & Ted Lee (Clarkson Potter)
Baking/ savory or sweet: “The Art of French Pastry,” by Jacquy Pfeiffer (Random House)
Beverage/ reference/ technical: “The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food & Drink in America, Second Edition,” by Andrew F. Smith (Oxford University Press)
Chefs and restaurants: “The A.O.C. Cookbook,” by Suzanne Goin (Random House)
Children, youth and family: “ChopChop: The Kids’ Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family,” by Sally Sampson (Simon & Schuster)
Compilations: “The Chelsea Market Cookbook: 100 Recipes From New York’s Premier Indoor Food Hall,” by Michael Phillips with Rick Rodgers (Stewart, Tabori & Chang)
Culinary history: “Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History,” by Rachel Laudan (University of California Press)
Culinary travel: “The Perfect Meal,” by John Baxter (HarperCollins Publishers)
First book: “Stone Edge Farm Cookbook,” by John McReynolds (Stone Edge Farm)
Food matters: “Eat, Drink, Vote: An Illustrated Guide to Food Politics,” by Marion Nestle (Rodale) and “Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health,” by Jo Robinson (Hachette Book Group)
General: “Keepers,” by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion (Rodale)
Health and special diet: “Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening With Twelve Families From the Edible Plant Kingdom,” by Deborah Madison (Ten Speed Press)
International: “Sauces & Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way,” by Oretta Zanini De Vita & Maureen B. Fant (W.W. Norton & Co.)
Literary food writing: “One Soufflé at a Time,” by Anne Willan and Amy Friedman (St. Martin’s Press)
Photography: “I Love New York: Ingredients and Recipes,” by Daniel Humm & Will Guidara (Francesco Tonelli, photographer) (Ten Speed Press)
Professional kitchens: “Elements of Dessert,” by Francisco Migoya and the Culinary Institute of America (Wiley)
Single subject: “Mast Brothers Chocolate: A Family Cookbook,” by Rick Mast and Michael Mast (Hachette Book Group)
Wine, beer and spirits: “Wine Grapes,” by Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding & Jose Vouillamoz (HarperCollins Publishers)
Global design: “Manresa: An Edible Reflection,” by David Kinch & Christine Muhlke (Ten Speed Press)
E-cookbook: “The Journey,” by Katy Sparks, Alex Raij, Maneet Chauhan, Rita Sodi and Kathleen Squires (Alta Editions)
Jane Grigson award: “Wine Grapes,” by Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding & Jose Vouillamoz (HarperCollins Publishers)
Design award: “Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden,” by Matt Wilkinson (Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers)
Judges’ choice: “The Drunken Botanist,” by Amy Stewart (Workman Publishing Co.) and “ Lark – Cooking Against the Grain,” by John Sundstrom (Community Supported Cookbooks)
Historical cookbook award: “American Cookery,” by Amelia Simmons (1796)

Culinary classics awards:
• “The Art of Mexican Cooking,” by Diana Kennedy (Clarkson Potter, 1989)
• “Invitation to Indian Cookery,” by Madhur Jaffrey (Knopf, 1973)
• “Betty Crocker’s Cookbook” (originally “Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book”), by Betty Crocker (1950)
• “The Moosewood Cookbook,” by Mollie Katzen (Ten Speed, 1977)
• “The Silver Palate Cookbook,” by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins (Workman, 1982)
 

For details on the digital, journalism and other IACP awards, see the posting in full. 

But the big news from Taste is that freelancer Steve Hoffman won the award for Culinary Narrative Writing with his story for the food section, "From the wild: meals from a hunter," that ran on Thanksgiving Day. Find it here.

Follow Lee Svitak Dean on Twitter: @StribTaste

The Bachelor Farmer serves up a meal for the Vice President

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: February 20, 2014 - 10:50 AM

What do you serve when you've got a Vice President at the dinner table? The Bachelor Farmer delivered when Joe Biden stopped by Wednesday night for a fundraising event, after stopping earlier for a press moment at nearby Moose & Sadie's coffee shop.

TBF offered a three-course meal, starting with bibb lettuce and goat's cheese, offering a choice of a main course (roasted haddock or beef short ribs) and finishing with a brown butter lemon cake.

It was a heady day for the staff at TBF, which had received two James Beard Award semifinalist nominations in the morning, one for chef Paul Berglund in the category of Best Chef Midwest and the other for the Marvel Bar, TBF's downstairs lounge, which was nominated for Outstanding Bar Program.

See the full menu below, which was designed by local calligrapher Crystal Kluge, who also designed the Marvel Bar's logo.

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