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Posts about Cookbooks

Recipe: Raspberry Rhubarb Pie

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: May 8, 2014 - 11:16 AM

As if anyone needed it, the following is a reason to purchase "New Scenic Cafe: The Cookbook." It's one of three fruit pie formulas that chef and author Scott Graden includes in the book.

RASPBERRY RHUBARB PIE

Note: This recipe must be prepared in advance. “Our raspberry rhubarb pie is another sought-after treat at the New Scenic Cafe,” writes Scott Graden in “New Scenic Cafe: The Cookbook.” “I have always enjoyed the tart and bitter flavor of rhubarb, and it is traditional to use it in desserts in Minnesota, though I add just enough sugar to soften the rhubarb’s singular impact. When it is in season, I use as much fresh rhubarb as I can get my hands on. Use fresh for this recipe, if it’s available, but frozen rhubarb also works well."

For crust:

3/4 c. vegetable shortening

1 3/4 c. flour, plus extra for rolling crust

1 tsp. kosher salt

5 oz. ice-cold water

For filling:

2 lb. rhubarb

12 oz. frozen raspberries

1/2 c. flour

1 1/3 c. plus 1 tbsp. sugar, divided

Freshly whipped cream

Directions

To prepare crust: Before beginning, chill the vegetable shortening in the refrigerator. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour and salt. Using a pastry blender, cut in shortening, until shortening pieces are no larger than the size of peas.

Add water to mixture, using a fork to blend it together lightly until dough looks evenly damp (you should be able to see small clumps of shortening in the dough). Lightly flour a work surface. With floured hands,form dough into a ball, then divide dough into 2 equal parts. Gently shape each piece of dough into a smooth, round disc and wrap each disc tightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate dough for at least 30 minutes.

To prepare filling: If using frozen rhubarb, allow it to defrost fully (though the raspberries should remain frozen). For fresh rhubarb, clean the stalks and chop them into 1/4-inch pieces. In a large bowl, combine rhubarb, raspberries, 1/2 cup flour and 1 1/3 cups sugar, and stir until evenly combined.

To prepare pie: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove dough discs from refrigerator and unwrap. On a floured work surface, using a floured rolling pin, roll dough until it is just wider than the outer rim of the pie pan. Transfer dough into pie pan, and press dough into pan’s edges, making sure the end of the crust just barely hangs over the rim of the pan all the way around. Place pie pan in the refrigerator. 

Roll the second dough disc to the same size as the first. Remove pie pan from refrigerator, fill it with prepared fruit filling. Transfer second crust to the top of the pie, making sure there are no air pockets between the filling and the top crust. Roll and crimp edges of the top and bottom crusts to seal them together. Using the tip of a knife, cut several vent holes in the top crust, and dust with 1 tablespoon sugar.

Place pie pan on a baking sheet and bake pie for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 300 degrees and bake pie for another 35 minutes. Using an instant-read thermometer, check temperature at the pie’s center, baking until it reads 170 degrees. Any juices that have bubbled out should appear clear rather than cloudy, indicated doneness, and the crust should be light golden brown. Remove pie from oven, place pie pan on a cooling rack and allow it to cool to room temperature (at least 1 hour) before slicing. Serve with freshly whipped cream.

Best cookbooks of year get nod from IACP

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: March 18, 2014 - 10:35 AM

Award season has begun in the cookbook world as the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) bestowed its nod to volumes that are particularly noteworthy over the weekend. Among the new designations in the contest this year are awards for classic, historical and e-cookbooks. 

The envelope (and categories), please …  


Book of the year: “Stone Edge Farm Cookbook,” by John McReynolds (Stone Edge Farm)


American: “The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen,” by Matt Lee & Ted Lee (Clarkson Potter)
Baking/ savory or sweet: “The Art of French Pastry,” by Jacquy Pfeiffer (Random House)
Beverage/ reference/ technical: “The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food & Drink in America, Second Edition,” by Andrew F. Smith (Oxford University Press)
Chefs and restaurants: “The A.O.C. Cookbook,” by Suzanne Goin (Random House)
Children, youth and family: “ChopChop: The Kids’ Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family,” by Sally Sampson (Simon & Schuster)
Compilations: “The Chelsea Market Cookbook: 100 Recipes From New York’s Premier Indoor Food Hall,” by Michael Phillips with Rick Rodgers (Stewart, Tabori & Chang)
Culinary history: “Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History,” by Rachel Laudan (University of California Press)
Culinary travel: “The Perfect Meal,” by John Baxter (HarperCollins Publishers)
First book: “Stone Edge Farm Cookbook,” by John McReynolds (Stone Edge Farm)
Food matters: “Eat, Drink, Vote: An Illustrated Guide to Food Politics,” by Marion Nestle (Rodale) and “Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health,” by Jo Robinson (Hachette Book Group)
General: “Keepers,” by Kathy Brennan & Caroline Campion (Rodale)
Health and special diet: “Vegetable Literacy: Cooking and Gardening With Twelve Families From the Edible Plant Kingdom,” by Deborah Madison (Ten Speed Press)
International: “Sauces & Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way,” by Oretta Zanini De Vita & Maureen B. Fant (W.W. Norton & Co.)
Literary food writing: “One Soufflé at a Time,” by Anne Willan and Amy Friedman (St. Martin’s Press)
Photography: “I Love New York: Ingredients and Recipes,” by Daniel Humm & Will Guidara (Francesco Tonelli, photographer) (Ten Speed Press)
Professional kitchens: “Elements of Dessert,” by Francisco Migoya and the Culinary Institute of America (Wiley)
Single subject: “Mast Brothers Chocolate: A Family Cookbook,” by Rick Mast and Michael Mast (Hachette Book Group)
Wine, beer and spirits: “Wine Grapes,” by Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding & Jose Vouillamoz (HarperCollins Publishers)
Global design: “Manresa: An Edible Reflection,” by David Kinch & Christine Muhlke (Ten Speed Press)
E-cookbook: “The Journey,” by Katy Sparks, Alex Raij, Maneet Chauhan, Rita Sodi and Kathleen Squires (Alta Editions)
Jane Grigson award: “Wine Grapes,” by Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding & Jose Vouillamoz (HarperCollins Publishers)
Design award: “Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden,” by Matt Wilkinson (Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers)
Judges’ choice: “The Drunken Botanist,” by Amy Stewart (Workman Publishing Co.) and “ Lark – Cooking Against the Grain,” by John Sundstrom (Community Supported Cookbooks)
Historical cookbook award: “American Cookery,” by Amelia Simmons (1796)

Culinary classics awards:
• “The Art of Mexican Cooking,” by Diana Kennedy (Clarkson Potter, 1989)
• “Invitation to Indian Cookery,” by Madhur Jaffrey (Knopf, 1973)
• “Betty Crocker’s Cookbook” (originally “Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book”), by Betty Crocker (1950)
• “The Moosewood Cookbook,” by Mollie Katzen (Ten Speed, 1977)
• “The Silver Palate Cookbook,” by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins (Workman, 1982)
 

For details on the digital, journalism and other IACP awards, see the posting in full. 

But the big news from Taste is that freelancer Steve Hoffman won the award for Culinary Narrative Writing with his story for the food section, "From the wild: meals from a hunter," that ran on Thanksgiving Day. Find it here.

Follow Lee Svitak Dean on Twitter: @StribTaste

Meet Hank Shaw

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: September 9, 2013 - 12:10 PM

 

 

Hank Shaw isn't a Food Network-level brand name. Well, at least not yet.

But the highly engaging voice behind the blog Hunter Angler Gardener Cook (winner of the James Beard Foundation's 2013 Best Food Blog award) and the author of the well-received 2012 cookbook "Hunt, Gather Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast" embodies a rapidly growing segment of the American cooking population, that of the self-sufficient, eating-off-the-grid forager, farmer, fisherman and hunter.

Shaw's latest work, "Duck, Duck, Goose: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Waterfowl, Both Farmed and Wild" is debuting next month, and the Sacramento, Calif.-based writer is making an appearance at the Bachelor Farmer on Oct. 9 at 7 p.m.

Expect a family-style tasting menu -- created by Shaw and Bachelor Farmer chef Paul Berglund -- along with wine pairings and cocktails by Marvel Bar mixmaster Pip Hanson. Oh, and plenty of conversation with Shaw. Cost is $145 per person, reservations (starting after 2 p.m. Monday) at 612-206-3920.

 

Minnesota chef/writer debuts on Food Network

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean Updated: September 11, 2013 - 2:48 PM
Amy Thielen

Amy Thielen

The Midwest will be getting the spotlight as our Minnesota writer Amy Thielen heads to the Food Network in a six-episode program,"Heartland Table." The show debuts on Sept. 14 at 9:30 a.m. (just following the network's "The Pioneer Woman."

Amy, whose stories in the Star Tribune Taste section won a James Beard award, also has a new cookbook, that will be published the end of September. "The New Midwestern Table," focuses on regional traditions, from fish frys to booyah and braunschweiger.

Find out more about both next week in Taste.

Update: Here's the interview with Amy that appeared in the Sept. 12 issue of the Star Tribune Taste section.

A taste of the Duluth Grill

Posted by: Rick Nelson Updated: July 11, 2013 - 11:28 AM

In between meals during my recent visit to Duluth, I spent some quality time browsing through the Bookstore at Fitger's, the sweet indie-owned retailer (it focuses on northeastern Minnesota titles) in the Fitger's shopping complex.

I was delighted to come across "The Duluth Grill Cookbook." Souvenir time.

Published earlier this year, the story- and image-packed volume (produced by author Robert Lillegard and photographer Rolf Hagberg) is filled with more than 100 make-at-home versions of the restaurant's most popular recipes. Here are three.

DULUTH GRILL PANCAKES

Makes about 1 dozen pancakes.

1 c. whole wheat flour

1 c. all-purpose flour

3/4 c. sugar

2 tsp. baking soda

1 tbsp. plus 2 3/4 tsp. baking powder

2 3/4 tsp. salt

1 tbsp. plus 1 3/4 tsp. cornstarch

2 c. buttermilk

3 eggs

1/4 c. (1/2 stick) butter, melted and cooled

Directions

In a large bowl, whisk together whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cornstarch and reserve. In a medium bowl, using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat buttermilk and eggs until well combined. Add dry mixture, stirring until just combined. Add melted butter and stir until just combined.

Preheat a non-stick griddle to medium-high. Make pancakes, 1 at time, by pouring 1/3 cup batter onto hot griddle. When bubbles form on top of pancake, flip and cook until both sides are golden brown. Serve with room temperature butter and maple syrup.

 

DULUTH GRILL WILD RICE BURGERS

Serves 6.

Note: Panko are Japanese bread crumbs. For 5 cups cooked wild rice, rinse 1 1/2 cups uncooked wild rice. In a saucepan over high heat, bring 4 1/2 cups salted boiling water. Add uncooked wild rice. Return to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer until kernels puff open, about 45 to 60 minutes (for chewier wild rice, use a shorter cooking time). Fluff wild rice with a fork and simmer 5 additional minutes, uncovered. Drain any excess liquid.

1 c. panko

1 1/2 c. mayonnaise

4 eggs, beaten

1 c. diced mushrooms

5 c. cooked wild rice

1 tsp. freshly ground white pepper

1 tsp. salt

1 1/2 tsp. granulated garlic

4 tsp. cumin

1 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper

Vegetable oil for cooking

Directions

In a large bowl, stir together panko, wild rice and mushrooms. Stir in eggs and mayonnaise. In a small bowl, combine pepper, salt, garlic, cumin and red pepper. Stir seasonings into wild rice mixture. Using a 1-cup metal measuring cup, scoop up mixture and form into patties about 2 inches thick.

In a heavy skillet over medium-high heat, heat 2 tablespoons oil. Add patties and pan fry until bottom side is browned. Flip patties and fry until browned and heated through. Serve on toasted buns.

 

DULUTH GRILL KETCHUP

Makes about 3 cups.

2 tbsp. olive oil

1/4 c. diced onion 

1 tsp. minced garlic

1 29-oz. can tomato sauce

1/4 c. honey

1/4 c. cider vinegar

1 tbsp. molasses

2 tbsp. red wine vinegar

Dash ground cinnamon

1 tbsp. cornstarch added to a bit of cold water to make a slurry

Directions

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, warm olive oil. Add onions and cook until transluscent. Add garlic and cook until garlic beings to change color; do not burn.

Add tomato sauce, honey, cider vinegar, molasses, red wine vinegar and cinnamon and whisk together thoroughly and increase heat to high. Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 1 hour. 

Transfer mixture to a blender and blend until smooth. Stain sauce through a strainer back into the saucepan over high heat. Stir in cornstarch slurry, increase heat to medium and bring mixture to a boil (you can add more cornstarch if you would like a thicker ketchup, or leave it out entirely if you prefer a thin ketchup). Remove from heat, transfer ketchup to a container and refrigerate. 

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