Jim Souhan analyzes the local sports scene and advises you to never take his betting advice. He likes old guitars and old music, never eats press box hot dogs, and can be heard on 1500ESPN at 2:05 p.m. weekdays, and Sundays from 10 a.m.-noon.

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Posts about Brad Childress

Molitor on Birk

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: February 20, 2013 - 12:17 PM
One element of my conversation with Paul Molitor that didn’t make it into my Wednesday column: His appreciation for what fellow Cretin High alum Matt Birk experienced this year.
Molitor grew up in the Brewers’ organization, and made a painful decision to leave Milwaukee for Toronto. As a Blue Jay, he won a World Series ring at the age of 37.
Birk grew up in the Vikings’ organization and was forced out of the organization, in part by then-head coach Brad Childress. They didn’t get along. So Birk signed with the Baltimore Ravens, and this season, at the age of 36, he won a Super Bowl title.
Molitor said he doesn’t know Birk well. ``But we have met a couple of times and like most people that meet him, I think he’s an impressive guy,’’ Molitor said. ``I admire his humility and intelligence and I respect his opinions and his outspokenness. I played in his golf tournament a couple of years ago.
``His is just a story of perseverance for a guy who wasn’t sure what he was going to do when he got pushed out of here, and he got a chance to reach the top. I can relate to that, his first championship coming late in his career. I’m happy for him.’’
And one more thought from Molitor on his current ``special assistant’’ position, in which he works primarily with minor-league player development.
``I’ve got talented people to work with, in terms of our other player development people,’’ he said. ``As part of the organization, I’m hoping that we’ve hit bottom and that the trend forward continues. It’s nice for me to see some of these kids on the verge of getting the opportunity to play in the big leagues.’’
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My new radio schedule: I'm on 1500ESPN at 12:20 on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday with Judd Zulgad and Jeff Dubay. Sunday Sports Talk remains the same, 10-noon on Sundays. We'll host the Ron Gardenhire Show again this year from 9:30-10. Thanks for listening, as always.
 

NFL picks, Tice and Chili news, and Vikings hangovers

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: January 20, 2012 - 5:54 PM

Mike Tice is set to interview for the Oakland Raiders' head coaching job. Brad Childress has interviewed in Tampa and could be on the Colts' list.

Make all the jokes you want about Tice's mistakes and Childress' foibles, but both became good NFL head coaches while on the job in Minnesota, and both will probably be even better if given a second chance.

Tice got blamed for the Love Boat scandal. I can tell you as someone who covered the Vikings for years that Tice's leadership had nothing to do with the scandal. The Vikings held similar parties for decades, it's just that while Tice was in charge, the players got caught having that party on a boat in front of people they had not paid off.

Tice deserves full blame for scalping Super Bowl tickets. That was stupid. But he's not the only NFL coach to do so, he was just the guy who got caught.

Tice helped the Vikings improve and took them to the playoffs with a very limited roster and a JV coaching staff, because Red McCombs, at that juncture of his ownership, did not want to pay for good people. Had Scott Linehan stayed and Matt Birk stayed healthy, Tice probably would have taken the team to the playoffs in consecutive years and would have been much harder to fire.

Childress went from 6-10 to 8-8 to 10-6 to 12-4 before Brett Favre and Randy Moss got him fired. He's a smart, talented coach who drove a lot of people inside and outside the Vikings' organization crazy, but I believe he gained a lot of perspective while he was here. Put him in the right organization, with a real general manager and clearly defined responsibilities, and I bet he wins a lot of games. Tampa Bay could be perfect, because they have a talented young quarterback, and finding and developing a quarterback was Childress' main problem in Minnesota.

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As for this weekend, here are my sure-to-backfire picks.

Ravens at Patriots:

I know the Ravens destroyed the Patriots in Foxboro the last time they met in the playoffs, but I believe this Ravens team has lots of problems that will doom it on Sunday.

The defense is old and a step slower than when it was a dominant unit. Joe Flacco is playing without confidence. And the Ravens don't scare anybody with their outside receivers. If Bill Belichick can find a way to rattle Flacco and control Ray Rice, the Ravens won't score many points.

Tom Brady is playing at a high level and can use Gronkowski and Hernandez to take advantage of the Ravens' diminished defensive speed. On defense, the Patriots had a terrible statistical season but are healthier now than they've been all year, and the return of Patrick Chung could make them more formidable.

I think this one's simple: The Patriots have a chance to score a lot of points, and the Ravens don't.

Patriots 27, Ravens 22.

Giants at 49ers:

Eli Manning is better than Alex Smith, and the Giants are the best and most complete team remaining in the playoffs. In researching my Sunday column, I found out that the Giants had the least rushing yards in the NFL this season. But they remain dangerous on the ground.

Modern sports championships are won by the hottest and healthiest teams, and the Giants qualify, just as the Packers did last year at this time.

As in the Patriots' game, I'm picking the team with the best chance to score a lot of points. As good as the 49ers' defense is, I think Manning uses this game to gain the kind of recognition usually reserved for his brother, Brady, Aaron Rodgers and Drew Brees.

Giants 24, 49ers 16.

Upcoming: With Tom Pelissero headed to Mobile to cover the Vikings staff at the Senior Bowl, Joe Schmit will join me at the boat show to run Sunday Sports Talk, from 10-noon.

Please follow me on Twitter at @Souhanstrib.

How did the Wolves pass the Vikings?

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: December 18, 2011 - 4:43 PM

Remember 23 months ago when the Timberwolves were the funniest joke in town and the Vikings had maybe the best team in football?

This weekend, the franchises passed each other, the Wolves heading up, the Vikings landing with a splat.

Throw out whatever qualifiers you want about the Wolves' exhibition opener - facing a bad team, exhibitions are meaningless, etc. - but that was entertaining basketball we were treated to on Saturday night. Rick Adelman, Derrick Wililams, Ricky Rubio, J.J.Barea and a slimmed-down Kevin Love give us five good reasons to care about the Wolves.

And that's not all. You could see Michael Beasley having an excellent year offensively in this system, and at least paying attention on defense. I think this team's biggest challenges will be figuring out what to do at center and shooting guard. Darko and Wes Johnson haven't proved themselves yet.

At center, Love playing inside might often be the answer. The problem for Johnson is that if he can't shine in this system, he's probably not an NBA player. He's got to prove himself quickly.

While the Wolves looked more promising than they have for years, the Vikings embarrassed themselves. This is becoming a trend. They got Brad Childress fired last year with a pathetic performance against Green Bay at the Dome. Now they've turned in three stinkers this season, at Chicago, at Green Bay and now at home on Sunday against the Saints.

I came to Minnesota in 1990 to cover the Vikings. This is easily the worst Vikings team I've ever seen in person. W'hich is amazing, considering this team has three stars in their prime in Adrian Peterson, Jared Allen and Percy Harvin.

I'm about to start working on my column for the Monday paper, and I believe this is the question that needs to be answered: Should anybody's job be safe right now? Leslie Frazier's? Christian Ponder's? Any coach's?

This was a pathetic display. Frazier said after the game that he took responsibility for his team not being prepare. He also said he wants to see how Ponder performs the last two weeks so he can judge him on a larger body of work.

I think Frazier and Ponder both will be trying to save their jobs the last two weeks, even if noone wants to admit that.

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Upcoming: I'll be on 1500espn at 2:05 on Monday and every weekday with Reusse and Mackey. Thanks to Terry Ryan for his bluntness when we had him on Sunday Sports Talk this morning.

 

Monday morning thoughts

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: October 17, 2011 - 11:16 AM

Monday morning second-guessing (let's call it what it is):

-Logically, there is no reason for professional head football coaches to have to jog through the maelstrom of bodies on the field after an emotional game and offer a gratuitous and often insincere handshake. It's a silly custom.

Logically, the practice should be banned.

But I'm glad it exists, because it's brought us some great moments, like Bill Belichick dissing Eric Mangini and now Jim Harbaugh and Jim Schwartz almost starting a brawl.

Here's the deal with Harbaugh and Schwartz: They were both wrong. Harbaugh was wrong to show up Schwartz, which he certainly did. Schwartz was wrong to escalate the situation by chasing Harbaugh down.

But I loved it. This is entertainment. It's also a win-or-bust business. Pro football is not for nice people. There are exceptions to that rule, like Tony Dungy, but they are rare exceptions. I love it when high-profile people bare their teeth and souls. So while I wouldn't want my kids or high school coach or even college coach behaving like this, in pro football, I love it when coaches break their usually cliche-ridden molds.

-I'm at Winter Park today, awaiting news on who starts at quarterback. I've been calling for Ponder since the Vikings fell to 0-3, but now I really don't think the timing matters much.

Start McNabb again, to save Ponder from facing the Packers in his first start? Fine with me. That's one of the reasons McNabb is here, to protect Ponder.

Start Ponder to introduce him to the NFL as quickly as possible, to prepare him for 2012 - or just to evaluate him? Fine with me. Why not?

Start Joe Webb? Fine by me.

When you're 1-5 and bound to lose and have so much of the season left, it really doesn't matter anymore.

-I fear for the Gophers. Their head coach is telling anyone who will listen that they're no good, and the players have every reason to believe him, and now they're facing a Nebraska team that will physically whip them. I fear not only for a 60-0 score, I fear for the players' safety. It's a hard game to play when your heart's not in it.

-To me, the Vikings' loss last night was predictable. They never play well in Chicago. Why would a bad Vikings team play well in Chicago when ever the best Vikings teams have struggled in that town and on that surface?

I am surprised it became a blowout so quickly. I keep thinking about all the quality players the Vikings have, but, then, these are the same players who seemed to quit under Brad Childress just a year ago. Maybe their talent level is overrated.

-Gov. Mark Dayton has been very even-handed, smooth and presidential in his handling of the Vikings' stadium debate. Now he's saying that a 1-5 record makes the stadium iniative less popular.

That's a blatant copout, and the kind of statement that makes us hate politicians. Noone, whether stadium proponent or opponent, should base a decision that will affect the state for good or ill for the next 30-plus years on how Donovan McNabb is playing this season.

The Vikings are a state asset. Different people will value their presence in different ways. I'm a sports guy. I value sports and think there are intangible benefits to having a team in state as well as tangible economic benefits. If you don't value sports, I don't expect you to agree with me.

But the decision should not be based on a win-loss record, whether the Vikings were 6-0 or 1-5. The decision should be based on the value of having an NFL franchise in our state. And if Dayton or anyone else wants to argue that we should let the Vikings leave because they're 1-5, I would argue that Minnesota eventually would decide to lure back an NFL franchise, and that acquiring another franchise will be much more expensive and complicated than building a stadium for the current franchise, which, for all of its faults and big losses, has been remarkably entertaining and competitive for decades.

-Since the start of the 2010 season, the Vikings are 7-15. That's the fourth-worst record

Here are the teams that are similar or worse during that span:

Carolina: 3-19.

Denver: 5-16.

Arizona: 6-15.

Cincinnati: 6-14.

St. Louis: 7-14.

Cleveland: 7-14.

Miami: 7-13.

-My pick: Rangers in six. Other than Cris Carpenter, I don't think the Cardinals' pitching staff can handle the Rangers' lineup.

-Upcoming: I'll be on 1500espn at 2 p.m. with Reusse and Mackey, then on tonight, perhaps around 6:40, with Tom Pelissero. I'll also be on with Mike McFeely on KFGO in Fargo at 2:35.

My twitter handle is @Souhanstrib.

 

 

The BCS is a joke

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: January 11, 2011 - 4:47 PM

 

BCS executive director Bill Hancock, trying to defend the indefensible, told writers on Monday that ``there is no groundswell among presidents or commissioners for seismic change’’ to the system.

He also said this: ``

"I try not to get to defensive about this…. but I’m disappointed by the childish rhetoric that comes from some quarters. But words like cartel and criminals and all these other "C" words … corruption, communist, they are absolutely silly and childish when referring to this arrangement. This is a group of schools doing what’s best for their students. It’s not sinister; there’s nothing evil about it. What kind of corrupt deal would give (TCU) an opportunity to play in (the Rose Bowl)? They played in the Rose Bowl because of the BCS.’’

Although I am fully in favor of the BCS ``cartel’’ being termed ``corrupt,’’ let me add my own ``C’’ word to the list:

Comical.

The BCS and its bought-and-paid-for defenders have become comical.

Their latest attempt to damage what might be the most entertaining sport in existence occured on Monday, when the BCS, dictating that the so-called national championship game be played on Jan. 10, forced Auburn and Oregon to wait 47 games between games to play the most important game of the year, perhaps the most important game ever played by either school.

The result: Two of the most innovative and crisp offenses in memory played like this was the first day of spring practice, not the national title game.

When I covered baseball, I’d find myself waiting out a lockout or strike or negotiation in a hotel lobby somewhere, and the ball writers would turn to each other and say, ``Thank heavens this is such a great game, or it wouldn’t survive this idiocy.’’

That’s what we should all say about college football now. It is a sport unmatched for pagentry and atmosphere, for passion and unpredictability, and yet it frequently embarrasses itself.

The BCS is the greatest embarrassment of all. It arbitrarily decides national titles, excludes worthy teams with impeccable resumes, allows cheating to be punished in ways that protects its bottom line, and delays the most important game of the season until the teams playing in it are rustier than a 1976 Dodge Dart.

Hancock is like the university presidents and bowl game officials he represents and defends: He is corrupt. He is defending an indefensible system not because it is the best or most interesting or most profitable system, but because the people whose pockets are being filled do not want to lose their Sugar (Bowl) Daddy.

TCU finished its season undefeated and handled an impressive Wisconsin team in the Rose Bowl, and yet has no way to prove it is the best team in the country.

Corrupt? It would seem so.

Comical? Absolutely.

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I’m at the Wolves game tonight. I’m frequently amazed at how interesting I find this team, and I find this to be a fascinating matchup - the talented but misguided Wolves against the aged and intelligent Spurs.

If you switched coaches tonight, which team would you pick? I might have to take Popovich and the Wolves at home against Rambis and the Bone Spurs.

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I see that basketball boss David Kahn is defending Kurt Rambis.

One question: How often in the history of sports has a GM predicted he was going to fire his coach?

I’m not saying Rambis will be fired. What I’m saying is that every coach remains safe until the team hits a tipping point of sorts.

For Brad Childress, that was getting blown out at home against Green Bay while his players bickered on the sideline.

I’m sure Rambis is safe for the moment. But what if his team quit on him, and lost 10 straight by an average of 15 points?

I don’t expect that to happen. I’m just saying I don’t lend Kahn’s words any weight on this matter.

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You don't need to know much about Trevor Mbakwe's case to know this: Contacting in any way a woman who has sought a restraining order against you when you are not even far removed of felony assault charges is not a bright way to conduct oneself or one's career.

He deserves to be suspended for stupidity alone.

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Upcoming: I’ll be on 1500espn on Thursday, from 3-6 p.m., spending an hour with Mr. Reusse, then running Garage Logic for Joe Soucheray.

Working on guests for Sunday Morning Sports Talk, 10-noon.

My twitter name is Souhanstrib, and I’m also on 1500espn at 2:40 every weekday afternoon.

 

 

 

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