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Pawlenty popularity dips but he still gets higher marks than Legislature in poll

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger under Minnesota governor, Minnesota legislature Updated: March 6, 2010 - 7:58 AM

Minnesotans aren't too happy with those in charge of their state, according to a new poll.

The poll, done by SurveyUSA for KSTP-TV, found that 52 percent of Minnesotans disapprove of the job Gov. Tim Pawlenty is doing and only 42 approve, giving him some of the lowest marks he's gotten in his seven plus years at the state's helm.

He can't fully blame his out of state travel for his bad showing. About two thirds of those polled say Pawlenty's frequent out of state travel makes him more effective as governor or has no impact. A strong minority -- 40 percent -- said the travel makes him less effective. The pollster also found that by a wide margin, Minnesotans don't think Pawlenty should run for president. Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed said the governor "should not" run for president in 2012.

As he tangles with the state's Legislature when he is back in the state, at least Pawlenty can take comfort in knowing more people approve of him than the band of 201 lawmakers running around the Capitol's marbled halls.

According to the poll, 66 percent of Minnesotans disapprove of the Legislature and only a quarter approve. State lawmakerscan at least feel good that they get higher marks than their colleagues in Congress -- according to a Rasmussen poll, only 10 percent (!) approve of the job the Washington gang is doing.

Most of the questions on the poll has a margin of sampling error of more than 4 percent, so there's some swing in the exact numbers. But Minnesotans unhappiness with politicians likely still holds steady.

 

 

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