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Dayton leaves his own press conference

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger Updated: January 18, 2012 - 5:25 PM

Gov. Mark Dayton Wednesday morning left a news conference he had called after about 14 minutes.

During a hastily called media availability, at which he and his commissioners talked about a new state effort to coordinate business services into a central "concierge"-like location, the governor left his own reception room while his commissioners were answering media questions.

Normally, Dayton, and other governors, stay in press conferences to allow media to ask questions unrelated to the main subject of their appearances. Dayton, in the past, has made himself very available to media questions.

On Wednesday, reporters were prepared to ask a series of questions about the Minnesota Vikings stadium push. The governor has been uncharacteristically silent on the subject for days.

On Monday, he told a Star Tribune reporter that he would not answer questions about it after a breakfast to commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday. On Tuesday, he said in a news conference about his planned borrowing bill that he would not answer any stadium questions.

Since last Thursday he has had nine stadium plans, including those from presumed front-runners Minneapolis and Ramsey County. Dayton has yet to indicate a favorite site.

Meanwhile, a stadium working group is slated to meet for hours Wednesday afternoon and evening.

Update:

Later in the day, Dayton met with the media to discuss the Vikings stadium. He noted "for the record" at the end of that availability that he stayed to answer questions 19 minutes longer than he had earlier in the day. Duly noted.

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