Dee DePass has been a Star Tribune business reporter since 1993, covering small business, financial institutions, manufacturing and, most recently, the economy. Originally from New York, Dee came to Minnesota after earning her master's in journalism at the University of Maryland and her undergraduate degree at Vassar College.

Workers enter 2012 unenthused and looking for change

Posted by: Dee DePass under Employment Updated: December 5, 2011 - 4:32 PM

Workers are less committed and less satisfied today than they were five years ago, according to a new survey by the employment benefits gurus at Mercer.

The discontent seems to stem partly from the economy and employer mandates that have fewer workers doing much more with less pay and stability. The fall out apparently is measurable, Mercer officials said.

According to the survey, the most disgruntled workers reported being ready to bolt and greatly dissatisfied with their benefit packages, type of work,available training opportunities and compensation.

"Engagement today is at historic low levels and employees are not happy with the current deal, said Pete Foley, Mercer's Employee Research Leader for North America. "Employees are reacting to actions taken during the economic downturn, such as cuts in pay, benefits, training and promotions and increased workloads due to layoffs."

Foley suggests that employers assess employee engagement levels within their firms to determine which workers are at risk of leaving.

Key results from the survey found that those most likely to be "so outta here" tend to be:

  • Male - 34 percent men, vs 30 percent women.
  • Young -  44 percent were between the ages of 16 and 24 while  40 percent were  between the ages of 25-34.
  • In management - 37 percent vs 30 percent
  • From select industries: high technology, retail/leisure; media/telecom; professional services; transportation/shipping; and financial services. 
     

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