Like Minneapolis, the city of Toronto sits in one of the busiest migratory
bird corridors in the world. And in both cities, birds get disoriented by
the reflection of sky, clouds and nearby habitat on building glass and try
to fly through it, with fatal results. Unlike Minneapolis, however, Toronto
took legislative action and implemented Bird Friendly Development Guidelines
to ensure that both new and existing buildings were made
<https://inhabitat.com/9-things-you-can-do-to-help-wild-birds-this-summer/>
safer for birds. 

Please join us on June 13 as Michael Mesure, founder and executive director
of the Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP) Canada, explains how FLAP worked
with Toronto city leaders to adopt bird-safe standards and how Minneapolis
can replicate them. Mesure advocates for bird protections at various levels
of government, and consults with city planners across North America on
developing bird-friendly guidelines. He will discuss green standards as well
as current and proposed legislation, and will offer recommendations for
retrofitting U.S. Bank Stadium to make it safer for birds. This is the third
of three presentations addressing retrofit options for the stadium.

Mesure's presentation will be held at the Brookdale Library, 6125 Shingle
Creek Parkway, Brooklyn Center, MN, on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, at 6:30
p.m. The event is free and open to the public, with a suggested donation of
$5, and is sponsored by a coalition of bird conservation groups including
Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis, Minnesota Citizens for the Protection of
Migratory Birds, and Friends of Roberts Bird Sanctuary.

Please share this message with friends and colleagues. If you have
questions, please reply to this email. We hope to see you on June 13.
 

(Used with permission of the author, Stephen Greenfield, Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis)

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Dancing grebes, diving terns, a night-heron in escape mode

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Neighborhood birds show courtship and nesting behavior