Cooler Nights Ahead!

Through Tuesday, the Twin Cities had observed 41 straight nights with a low of 60 or warmer, which was good enough for the ninth longest stretch on record. If we can make it through midnight Wednesday without dropping below 60, that will extend the streak one more day, pulling into a tie for eighth place. We do have cooler weather in the forecast to wake up Thursday morning, so that might be as far as we can make it. So far this year (again, through Tuesday) we have observed 59 nights with a low of 60 or higher - the most on record through July 24th.

Most areas of the state will dip into the 50s for lows to wake up Thursday morning, though a few spots in northern Minnesota will likely dip into the 40s.

More "chilly" weather is expected to wake up Friday morning, with more locations in northern Minnesota dipping into the 40s.

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A Breezy Taste Of Fall In The Air Today
By D.J. Kayser, filling in for Paul Douglas

Here's an unfriendly reminder for you: August - and the end of summer - is quickly sneaking up on us. We are now in the time of year where our average highs start slowly decreasing. Today's average high in the Twin Cities is 83, but by the end of next month it's only 78. The amount of sunlight is also decreasing at the rate of about two minutes per day right now, climbing to around three minutes per day by the end of August. Fall is certainly around the corner.

It'll feel more like fall than summer today as highs struggle to make it to 70. Fun fact: we do average one day each July with a high in the 60s. The last time that occurred, however, was back on July 14th, 2014 when the high only hit 65. Highs will rebound as we head toward the weekend, climbing back into the 80s next week.

An isolated shower may pop across southern Minnesota this afternoon; otherwise our next rain chances won't arrive until the weekend. Total July rainfall will be above average in the Twin Cities, but we could end the month on a dry note Tuesday.

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Extended Twin Cities Forecast

THURSDAY: Cool and windy. PM shower? High 69. Low 56. Chance of precipitation 20%. Wind NW 10-15 mph.
FRIDAY: Temperatures rebounding. Mainly sunny. High 77. Low 58. Chance of precipitation 0%. Wind NW 5-10 mph.
SATURDAY: Sunny start. Afternoon rain chances. High 77. Low 59. Chance of precipitation 30%. Wind W 3-8 mph.
SUNDAY: Increasing clouds. A few PM rumbles. High 79. Low 61. Chance of precipitation 50%. Wind NW 3-8 mph.
MONDAY: Mainly sunny. Isolated PM storm? High 81. Low 62. Chance of precipitation 20%. Wind NW 5-10 mph.
TUESDAY: Sunny skies. Highs around average. High 83. Low 65. Chance of precipitation 10%. Wind SW 5-10 mph.
WEDNESDAY: Staying warm and sunny to begin August. High 83. Low 66. Chance of precipitation 10%. Wind SE 5-10 mph.

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This Day in Weather History
July 26th

1981: A chilly morning occurs across the Northland, with 33 degrees at Roseau and Wannaska.

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Average Temperatures & Precipitation for Minneapolis
July 26th

Average High: 83F (Record: 100F set in 1955)
Average Low: 64F (Record: 45F set in 1962)
Average Precipitation: 0.14" (Record: 2.44" set in 1990)

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Sunrise/Sunset Times for Minneapolis
July 26th

Sunrise: 5:51 AM
Sunset: 8:46 PM

*Length Of Day: 14 hours, 54 minutes and 38 seconds
*Daylight Lost Since Yesterday: ~2 minute and 9 seconds

*Next Sunrise Of 6 AM Or Later: August 3rd (6:00 AM)
*Next Sunrise Of 8:30 PM Or Earlier: August 8th (8:29 PM)

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Minnesota Weather Outlook

Quite cool weather for late July will settle on in for Thursday across the state, with many areas not making it out of the 60s for highs. We will also watch the potential of a few showers in areas as we head throughout the day.

These highs for Thursday are certainly going to feel like fall. They will be a good 5-15 degrees below average across the state!

Warmer weather does return as we head toward the weekend and early next week, with highs rebounding into the 80s by next Monday. This warmer weather - which will be around average for the end of July and early August - will stick around through at least the end of next week at the moment.

We do watch that minor rain chance later in the day on Thursday, otherwise a few showers or storms will be possible Saturday through Monday mainly in the afternoon hours. The day with the best chance of rain is Sunday.

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National Weather Forecast

The stalled out boundary across the eastern United States will slowly start to move in areas on Thursday, in part due to another cold front which will be diving south and east across the Great Lakes to the Central Plains. With both frontal systems, showers and storms will be possible. Storms will also be possible back into the Rockies and Great Basin. Hot weather will continue across parts of the southern and western United States.

While heavy rain tapers off on Thursday across the Northeast, another round of (lighter) rain will be possible Friday. Heavy rain will be possible Friday into the weekend across parts of Florida. Multiple rounds of storms through the next five days will bring the potential of heavy rain to the central part of the nation, with the potential of 3"+ of rain by next Monday morning in some locations.

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Excessive Western Heat

Highs will continue to be toasty across the Southwest Thursday, with expected highs of 113 in Las Vegas and 111 in both Redding and Phoenix. Areas like Redding and Needles, CA could see record highs.

Warmth will continue in the Northwest as well Thursday, with highs around 100 in Medford and Boise and in the low to mid-90s in Portland.

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Evidence detected of lake beneath the surface of Mars

More from CNN: "A lake of liquid water has been detected by radar beneath the southern polar ice cap of Mars, according to a new study by Italian researchers from the Italian Space Agency, published Wednesday in the journal Science. Evidence was gathered by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding instrument, also known as MARSIS, on the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft. Between May 2012 and December 2015, MARSIS was used to survey the Planum Australe region, which is in the southern ice cap of Mars. It sent radar pulses through the surface and polar ice caps and measured how the radio waves reflected back to Mars Express."

Crop failure and bankruptcy threaten farmers as drought grips Europe

More from The Guardian: "Farmers across northern and central Europe are facing crop failure and bankruptcy as one of the most intense regional droughts in recent memory strengthens its grip.  States of emergency have been declared in Latvia and Lithuania, while the sun continues to bake Swedish fields that have received only 12% of their normal rainfall.  The abnormally hot temperatures – which have topped 30C in the Arctic Circle – are in line with climate change trends, according to the World Meteorological Organization. And as about 50 wildfires rage across Sweden, no respite from the heatwave is yet in sight."

Drought Forces Top Wheat Buyer Egypt to Pay Most Since 2015

More from Bloomberg: "A drought that’s hit wheat crops across the Black Sea region and Europe has forced Egypt, the world’s largest importer, to pay the highest price in more than three years.  Egypt’s state-run buyer General Authority for Supply Commodities paid an average $235.65 a metric ton in a tender closed Tuesday, according to traders familiar with the process and data compiled by Bloomberg. GASC purchased 420,000 tons of wheat for Sept. 1-10 delivery.  Benchmark futures traded in Chicago surged 21 percent this year and Paris wheat for December delivery hit a record for the contract. Dry weather means Russian production will fall for the first time in six years, while crops in France, Germany and the Baltic countries are also expected to be smaller."

Humans Influenced the Horrific Greek Fires in More Ways Than One

More from Earther: "Greece is the latest corner of our planet to be stricken by wildfires. Powerful winds whipped up flames on Monday, killing at least 60 people as of Tuesday.A number of factors came together to spark the devastation, many tied to how humans are changing the climate and how we choose to live. Ignoring that context means ignoring a big part of the story and the overwhelming challenges we face as the climate continues to trend hotter and drier. The countryside around Matis, a popular vacation destination northeast of Athens, has been turned into a postcard from the apocalypse. Whitewashed homes have become burned-out husks, and vacationers and residents have fled to beaches to avoid the flames. But in some cases, escape was impossible, with the bodies of 26 adults and children found huddled together at the edge of the sea, according to the BBC."

Teens help reimagine America’s first climate change museum

More from Grist: "On a Friday afternoon in New York’s Washington Square Park, 17-year-olds Alysa Chen and Johanna Neggie paint signs for an upcoming climate march and discuss their career prospects. Senior year is quickly approaching — so are the impending dangers of climate change.Sitting on the grass with paintbrushes and stencils in hand, the teens muse over which career path will be the most effective in solving climate change. Neggie is interested in public policy, but watching the Trump administration roll back key environmental protections has been discouraging. Plus, she says she hasn’t found any YouTube videos of what “a day in the life” of public policy would look like.“Young people aren’t just talking about climate change,” says Chen, who’s considering becoming an environmental attorney. “We’re entering the workforce.” Today’s youth, she continues, are going to build things that can suck carbon out of the air. They’re filing lawsuits. They’re going to vote. They’re marching to Washington. And in Chen’s case, they’re helping to design a climate museum curated in part by and for young people."

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Thanks for checking in and have a great Thursday! Don't forget to follow me on Twitter (@dkayserwx) and like me on Facebook (Meteorologist D.J. Kayser)!

 - D.J. Kayser

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